Warwick

JUL 04,2016 - JUL 04,2016 (1 DAYS)

United Kingdom

1 DAYS

History

Warwick Town and Castle:

Tip 1 Main Attractions: East Gate, The Warwickshire Yeomanry Museum, St. Mary Church, Lord Leycester Hospital.

Tip 2: Warwick castle. 

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Start & End: Stratford-upon-Avon Railway Station. Transportation : Two train lines connect Stratford-upon-Avon with the rest of UK: the North Warwickshire Line from Birmingham to SuA operated by London Midland and the Leamington-Stratford-London Line, which allows direct services to London operated by Chiltern Railways. A new Stratford Parkway railway station north of the town, next to the A46 road was opened on 19 May 2013. It is intended to ease congestion, as passengers from outside Stratford will no longer need to drive into the town to catch a train. Rail services between Birmingham and Stratford have been increased from hourly to half-hourly in conjunction with the opening of the new parkway station. 1 train every hour and a half, or every hour to Leamington Spa via Warwick, operated by Chiltern Railways (06.26, 07.33, 09.00, 10.37, 11.03, 12.40), Sundays: same hours with additional times: 09.26, 11.26).  Lengthy services  run daily to London Marylebone or Euston on weekdays (06.26, 07.33, 07.43, 09.00, 09.26, 10.37, 11.03, 11.26, 12.40, 13.03) and Sundays: 09.38, 10.29, 11.29, 12.19, 12.29) . There are two trains per hour from Coventry. One takes 37-45 minutes (HH.25) (change at Leamington Spa) and a longer one two minutes later (HH,27) wwhich takes 75 minutes (via Birmingham stations).

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Duration: One day. Distance: 5 km.

Weather: Warwick Castle grounds deserve a bright, smiling day. There is so much to explore and see there !

Orientation: You like grandiose, legendary castles or palaces ? DO NOT MISS Warwick, 13 km. north-east of Stratford-upon-Avon. A short train ride from Stratford-upon-Avon (or, even, from Birmingham). Warwick, itself, is ancient and beautiful. 

We start walking from the Warwick Railway station. We head SOUTH on Coventry Rd toward Station Rd, 160 m. We turn right onto St Johns to continue following Smith Street. Smith Street is the oldest shopping street in Warwick and boasts a unique mix of independent shops and restaurants. The buildings are lovely and there re lots of vintage, craft and gift shops. Do not miss the 1 and 3 Smith Street, Warwick and the East Gate, an access point to the town through the former town wall.

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We continue south-west along Smith Street. It changes its name to Jury Street. Here, you'll see another styled Timber-framed house:

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In the junction of Jury Street and Church Street - we have two attractions. The Warwickshire Yeomanry Museum is open ONLY 10.00 - 16.00 - Saturdays and Sundays. FREE. It is, actually, located in the basement of Warwick Tourist Information Office. A small, interesting museum. Nice memories of the fading British Empire.  Great collections for the elders of us. A good chance that you'll find this museum closed if you arrive before 10.00:

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Turn up to the impressive St. Mary Church or Chapel, in the same junction, created by Roger de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Warwick, in 1123. St Mary’s is open for visitors every day: April to end of September: from 10.00 - 18.00 , Sundays 12.30 - 16.30, October to end of March: from 10.00 to 16.30, Sundays 12.30 - 16.30. Free. The charge for the tower is £3 per adult, students over 16 £2.50, students under 16 £1.50 and family ticket £6 (2 adults and up to 4 children). Children less than 8 yrs are not permitted entering the tower. A stunning church with lots of historical details and facts. Allow one hour ! It is an outstanding perpendicular Gothic style church. The church, with much of Warwick, was devastated by the Great Fire of Warwick in 1693. The nave and tower of the building were completely destroyed. It was rebuilt In 1704, in a Gothic design by William Wilson. Christopher Wren is also said to have contributed to the design, but that is disputed. The impressive tower rises to the height of 40 metres (165 stairs to climb) . St Mary’s Tower offers spectacular views from the top: 

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It contains the effigial monuments of Richard de Beauchamp, 13th Earl of Warwick, Ambrose Dudley, 3rd Earl of Warwick, and Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester.

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Buried in the chancel of the church is William Parr, 1st Marquess of Northampton, the brother of Queen consort Catherine Parr.

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The Crown Court - a stunning court in front of St. Mary Church:

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The early Norman church was rebuilt in the 14th century by Thomas Beauchamp, father and son, the first Beauchamp Earls of Warwick. The first Thomas Beauchamp financed his building of the chancel with money obtained from the ransom of a French archbishop. The chancel, vestries, and chapter house were rebuilt in delightful Gothic style, making of St Mary one of the most attractive town churches of its day. The alabaster memorial to Thomas, who died of the plague during the siege of Calais, and his wife Katherine lies in the chancel. But the work of Thomas Beauchamp the 1st was outdone by his descendant, Richard de Beauchamp (d.1439), who provided funds in his will for the creation of a chantry chapel in St Mary's. This, Beauchamp Chapel, is one of the great Gothic architectural achievements in England: a masterpiece of Gothic style which took over 20 years to complete. The chapel, which is dedicated to Our Lady, is composed of three bays, at the centre of which is the tomb of Richard Beauchamp, raised on a pedestal and surrounded by an iron fence.

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The effigy of Earl Richard is set upon a chest of Purbeck marble, with a canopy above, and weeping figures below. Richard Beauchamp was the 13th Earl of Warwick, a friend of King Henry V and guardian of King Henry VI:

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Robert Dudley and his second wife, Lettice Knollys, are buried on the left of Beauchamp Chapel:

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and his brother, Ambrose Dudley, Earl of Warwick, 1528 - 1590, is buried in the foreground on the right:.

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Steps by Robert Dudley's tomb lead up into the delightful small C15th Dean’s Chapel with its fan vaulted ceiling:

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Warwick Yeomanry Chapel - Great East stained glass window with fine medieval jewelled glass. The east window contains fragments of Medieval glass rescued after destruction of the stained glass windows during the Reformation:

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Wall painting: Last Judgement from year 1678. Figures on the right are heading for salvation. Those on the left to hell:

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We exit the St. Mary Church and head back down southward along Church Street - until it meets Jury Street. We turn right to High Street (continuation of Jury Street) and walk 160 m. (we pass Swan Street and Brook Street on our right) until we see the Lord Leycester Hospital, immediately beyond the junction with Brook Street). This is not a museum, but a living institution, It is a retirement home for aged or disabled soldier and sex-servicemen (and their wives) (known as 'Brethrens' - similar to the Chelsea pensioners) and located next to the West Gate, on High Street. The building would forever be associated with Queen Elizabeth's favorite, Robert Dudley, 1st Earl of Leicester. He converted it in 1571, founding therein a hospital for aged or injured soldiers and their wives, under royal charter from the Queen. Open: Summer (from 1 APR): 10.00 – 17.00 pm, Winter 10.00  – 16.00. Prices (NO Credit Cards !): Adults – £8.50, Children – £5 (ages 5-18; under 5 free), Concessions – £6.50 (students, over 60), Family Ticket £20 (2 adults, up to 3 children). Allow, at least, ONE hour:

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Lord Leycester's Hospital consists of a group of outstanding half timbered buildings. The hospital survived the Warwick Fire of 1690's. Can you imagine that the hospital kitchen (nowadays, a cafe' - Brethrens' Kitchen) has continuously provided and served food since early 1500's ? (delicious portions !!). The Great Hall is also over 500 years old and is still in constant use for public venues and private weddings. Visiting the old hospital is a striking experience. You won't believe how this crooked old structure is still standing but it is nevertheless a historical marvel. You are transported, like in a time machine, to an earlier time, the staff brothers are very friendly, the architecture is amazing, the gardens are very pretty and relaxing. 

Lord Leycester Hospital Courtyard. You can climb up the stairs in the court yard to get a good view of warwick:

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You can also see the Great Hall

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and the Guild Hall with its armoury display:

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Note: The Museum of the Queen's Hussars is currently closed and in process of moving to a new location just up the road.

The garden, which is tucked away behind the building, should not be missed. The Master's Garden is a green oasis of calm. It is in its best during the Spring or Summer:

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The 12th century Norman arch and massive urn which once stood on the banks of the Nile:

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Trace back north-east along High Street and turn RIGHT (in the 2nd turn) to Castle Street. On our left the Yeomanry Museum, Information Tourist Office (with WC). The Castle Strret will bring us to Warwick Castle. turn to Tip 2 in this blog (below).

History

Warwick Castle:

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Open: everyday: 10.00 - 17.00. Prices (castle only w/o the dungeon): Adult £26.40, Child £23.40, Senior £22.40, Family of 4 £89.00, Family of 5 £110.20. Online reservation entitles you: Castle entrance, Beat the entry queue, Rainy Day Guarantee, buy now and get a one month NOW TV Pass: Adult £18.40, including the dungeon £22.60. For one entrance - EXPENSIVE but worth the hefty price if sunny outside. Expect long queues for entrance tickets during weekends, summer days, holidays. Attention: There seems to be very little shade (or shelter) provided in the castle's grounds. Bring your bottles with you in advance. Difficult to find running water around. Soft drinks ? A lot around and not cheap. Very limited number of food stalls so I would recommend bringing a picnic. The site will consume, at least, 3 hours, more probable - 5 hours. You may call it - an historical theme park not just a castle. There is plenty to amuse young people (in body and in soul) inside and out. Might be very busy and noisy in mornings due to school parties but much quieter in the afternoons. Not suitable for wheelchairs.

The entrance of Warwick Castle is from the Lower Court, with a square gatehouse joining the outer and inner walls, a polygonal high tower (Guy's Tower) to the right of it, two tall towers behind and a cluster of round towers seen in the left foreground:

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Lots of demonstrations and performances  like the Archery or Bowman Show, or birds of prey display, Trebuchet displays. Birds of prey demonstration, which are fabulous, take place at 12.30 (part 1) and part 2 at 14.30. Note that in the Archery displays it is hard to hear the actor or the performer:

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I started my lengthy visit in the Warwick Castle site - in its gardens. The first evidence of a decorative garden at Warwick relates to the visit of Queen Elizabeth in August 1572. A garden consisting of walkways, shrubs and hedgerows is recorded as being alongside the river Avon. This formal Elizabethan knot garden, through which Elizabeth herself would have strolled, marked the beginning of a change in the management of the Castle’s grounds and gardens. But, it was in the 1750s that the grounds at Warwick were to truly come into their own under the eye of Lancelot ‘Capability’ Brown. Capability Brown is one of Britain’s finest landscape gardeners (see our blogs on Blenheim Palace). At Warwick Castle, Capability Brown fashioned a landscape that today looks so natural it is hard for the visitor to perceive it as man-made. The mark of his genius is that it is only now, hundreds of years after the design was first made and plants selected and placed in the ground that the true majesty of his work can be appreciated.

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There is a circular route which surrounds the castle, its grounds: gardens  and battlements.

We start our visit in the entrance, in the East Gate and turn to the south, then west, north, and, back to the east. Remember, exploring the battlements involves a lot of stairs but is worth the climb. The views are incredible. The gardens are easier and are, basically, convenient for walk. Towers were the main defensive system for any castle. As well as to provide protection, defensive walls were often symbolic and represented the communities status and independence.

From the East Front Gate there is a long wall which extends until we we hit Caesar's Tower.  Standing at an impressive 45 m. tall, this is the tallest tower at the castle, and comprises of three storeys, excluding the Gaol. It was built on the orders of Thomas de Beauchamp in the 14th century and is a great example of military architecture. 

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Occupying the lowest chamber of Caesar's Tower and built in the 14th century, is the Gaol which is the original dungeon. Leading from a hatch in the ground at the base of the tower, a single flight of steps provided the way into, and the only way out of, the Castle's miserable Gaol. A single open drain running across the floor provided the only means of sanitation, whilst the only light to penetrate the gloom came from a tiny shaft high on the wall and a small window in a chamber, safely behind an iron grill, from where a guard could observe the wretched prisoners:

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Caesar's Tower contained a grim basement dungeon. According to local legend dating back to at least 1644 it is also known as Poitiers Tower, either because prisoners from the Battle of Poitiers in 1356 may have been imprisoned there, or because the ransoms raised from the battle helped to pay for its construction.

Pictures of the Battle of Poitiers year 1356 in the Dungeon:

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Caesar's Tower - View to the Entrance Gate:

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Caesar's Tower - View to Guy's Tower:

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Caesar's Tower - View to Avon River:

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Another overwhelming exhibition, taking place (temporarily ?) in the Caesar's Tower is the Roses Wars Exhibition. It’s 1455 and the House of Lancaster holds the English throne. King Henry VI’s crown is challenged by the House of York. The rival houses clash in battle and the bloody war that ensues was to last over 30 years. Again, the zigzag history of Warwick role in these wars: Though never called “Kingmaker” in his lifetime, Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick (1428-71) was, during the Wars of the Roses, the most important power-broker in England. A great-great-grandson of Edward III (and potential claimant to the throne), he gained vast wealth by marrying Anne Beauchamp, the richest heiress of the age. The Nevilles had supported the Yorkist side since 1453 and, after his father’s death, Warwick helped Edward IV to the throne in 1461. But his friendship with Edward soured after the King married Elizabeth Woodville. Fretting at being sidelined by the Woodville clan, he skillfully secured French support and engineered a revolt (1469-70) that briefly won back the throne for the deposed Henry VI. Edward proved resilient, however, and a better general. The two former allies clashed at Barnet in 1471 where Warwick (fighting on foot to stiffen his troops’ resolve) was cut off and killed during the Lancastrian rout. His daughter Anne married Edward’s brother Richard of Glaucester (later Richard III) the following year.

Armoured Horse and Knight:

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Daily life in this period of the 15th century:

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Down, in the gardens, a bit more south to the Caesar Tower - you find another archery demo:

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The Mill is in the south-east corner of the Warwick castle grounds, in a stunning location on the River Avon, just beside the main castle. It is a solid stone structure with a huge working waterwheel that has been beautifully restored. Inside the mill open viewing areas, glass and grills all ensure visitors get an excellent view of the machinery and the river rushing under your feet. The roar of the water is as dramatic as the machinery and together they create a tense atmosphere. Along with the smell of the oiled machines, it's an experience that fills your senses:

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History in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

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There is a viewing deck along part of the southern front walls, adjacent to The Mill. The southern walls are very impressive from The Mill and from the Avon river:

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Note: There are steep staircase climbing north-east from the The Mill lower grounds. This path (or stairs) lead to the East Gatehouse and the main entrance. If you continue southward, parallel to the southern walls and the Avon river - you arrive to a central junction. With your face to the river: the left path - leads to The Mill, the central one (your back side) leads to the Peacocks Garden and the Conservatory and the right one to the Birds Prey Mews, the Time Tower and The Mound. Behind the river, southward, extends the River Island or Kingmaker. The Kingmaker is an arena where the medieval panorama of Richard Neville who was called the Kingmaker (see below) takes place. This show TAKES PLACE ONLY IN SELECTED TIMES AND DURING THE DUSK HOURS (19.00-22.00). It is targeted, mainly, for groups with in-advance booking. It is well laid out with very good and informative panels. Here you can see all the preparations for the Battle of Barnet in 1471(see below) :the archers, the cannon makers. The First Battle of St Albans, fought on 22 May 1455 at St Albans, 22 miles (35 km) north of London, traditionally marks the beginning of the Wars of the Roses. Richard, Duke of York and his allies, the Neville Earls of Salisbury and Warwick, defeated a royal army commanded by Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, who was killed. With King Henry VI captured, a subsequent parliament appointed Richard of York Lord Protector. The sudden attack and bravery in the 25-year-old Earl of Warwick began his famous military career and later would help form his nickname "the Kingmaker". This, The First Battle of St. Albans, also led, later, to the ascension of Edward, Duke of York, to the English throne. As a reward for his help, Warwick rose to a position of great power. On 14 April 1471 near Barnet, then a small Hertfordshire town north of London, Edward led the House of York in a fight against the House of Lancaster, which backed Henry VI for the throne. Leading the Lancastrian army was Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, who played a crucial role in the fate of each king. Formerly, Warwick defected to the Lancastrians over disagreements about Edward's nepotism, secret marriage and foreign policy.... I tried to cross the bridge and to have a look at the Kingmaker arena. BUT THE BRIDGE TO THE RIVER ISLAND (KINGMAKER) WAS (IS) BLOCKED. SO, IN AN INDIVIDUAL VISIT, DURING THE MORNING OR THE AFTERNOON - FORGET ABOUT VISITING THE KINGMAKER DINNER SPECTACLE. But, The Mighty Trebuchet takes place, daily, at 11.30 and 16.00. Firing is twice daily:

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I heartily recommend stepping over The Bridge which leads to the River Island. You enjoy magnificent views to both of your sides: To the East (to the Mill):

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and to the west (to the Woodland Lodge direction):

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If you continue walking southward - you arrive to The Great Hall. The Great Hall is the largest room in the Castle and continues to be No. 1 visitors' most-time-explored attraction. In the early middle ages, straw and dirt covered the floor of the Great Hall. Burning in the centre of the room would have been a large fire. It was in here that the nobility ate, drank and slept. The Great Hall as it stands today was first constructed in the 14th century. It was rebuilt in the 17th century and then restored in 1871 after it had been badly damaged by a fire which swept through part of the Castle. 

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Set against the wall is the magnificent Kenilworth Buffet, made in oak by local craftsmen for the Great Exhibition of 1851 and associated with the colorful love story of Queen Elizabeth I and her courtier Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester:

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In the Great Hall is a huge metal pot for cooking known as ‘Guy’s Porridge Pot’, named after the legendary Saxon hero, Guy of Warwick. About 500 years old, it was used to cook stew for the castle’s garrison of soldiers. Other exciting artifacts include various suits of armour and two pristine pieces of equestrian armour:

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There is a miniature suit of armour which is believed to have been made for the four year old son of Robert Dudley, the Earl of Leicester. He died at the age of six.

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The interiors of the Castle include the Great Hall, the State Rooms: the Dining Room, the Red Drawing Room, the Cedar Drawing Room, the Green Drawing Room, the Queen Anne Bedroom & the Boudoir. You could also visit the enchanting Chapel. All the rooms were beautifully laid out with period furniture, paintings, armour, & tapestries. All are in excellent condition. Try for the guided tour which lasts around 40 minutes as you will get more information than doing it yourself. The State Rooms have been extended, altered and embellished during virtually every century, to provide the best possible environment to entertain the noblest of guests and to display the family’s most prestigious possessions. Off from the Great Hall is the State Dining Room, originally commissioned by Francis Greville in 1763. George IV, Edward VII, Queen Victoria and Prince Albert all dined here and this room continues to be used for impressive dinner parties. 

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Frederick Louis, eldest son of George II, was never a king but was an art lover - State Dining Room:

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Guy Warwick Trophy - local legendary hero battling Dun Cow (story from the 1200s) - State Dining Room:

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The Red Drawing Room gets its name from the bright red lacquered panelling across all four walls, this room was extensively refurbished in the 17th century. In this room, there are famous paintings of Ambrosio Spinola and Sir Phillip Sidney, however the main painting in this room is of Jeanne d’Aragon, the granddaughter of King Ferdinand IV of Naples. Often regarded as the most beautiful women in 16th century Europe, she was considered clever, witty and powerful. 

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Jeanne d’Aragon Picture:

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Henry VIII six wives in the Red Room:

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The most eye-catching attraction of the Green Drawing Room (with green walls) are the numerous paintings hanging from the walls.

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The key theme across the paintings is a snapshot of life during the English Civil War. Either side of the fireplace are pictures of King Charles I and his wife, Henrietta Maria as well as portraits of Charles I nephew, Prince Rupert of the Rhine.

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Sadly, most of the men and women pictured here perished in the conflict so these paintings serve as a poignant reminder of a whole generation of people. The Cedar Drawing Room is Italian in style. The intricate cedar panelling was completed in the 1670s by two local craftsmen, William and Roger Hurlbult. Another impressive feature of the room is the 19th century French carpet. Amazingly, it was woven in one piece at Aubusson in France and if you look closely, you can see in each corner the Bear and Ragged Staff emblem of the Earls of Warwick which is still the county’s main emblem today:

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The Queen Anne Bedroom gets its name from Queen Anne's bed which is the central feature of the room. According to tradition, Queen Anne was to have visited Warwick Castle in 1704 and, by way of preparation, her state bed was sent on in advance from Windsor where she predominantly resided. Although the planned visit was cancelled, the magnificent royal bed stayed on and in 1773, King George III made a permanent gift of it to Francis, the then Earl of Warwick. The bed hangings are of crimson velvet with sea-green panels. Standing near the bed is one of the Queen’s leather-covered travelling chests, a perfect size to fit in some of her beautiful dresses. Hanging on the walls, make sure to check out the beautiful Delft tapestries, dating from 1604, depicting palace gardens. 

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The Blue Boudoir is a dressing room, in the 17th and 18th centuries, the walls were redecorated in the 19th century with silk from Lyon. The walls of this charming room are hung with beautiful pastel blue and silver silk from France. The furniture too is covered in blue upholstery and has French gilt wood frames.The most dominant aspect of the room is a portrait of King Henry VIII, from the studio of Hans Holbein, which shows the King in his early forties.

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The last space is The Chapel. Sir Fulke Greville, the first Lord Brooke, authorized the building of the small chapel in the early 1600s. It may be on the site of another chapel founded as long ago as 1119. Until the start of the 20th century, the families of the Earls of Warwick would have come here to worship. The servants also used this as their church, however they would have to stand behind the screen, in the sight of God, but out of the sight of their masters and mistresses... 

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Wood Carving Battle Of The Amazons in one of the staterooms, Flemish:

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There are wax figures in the state rooms - maids, valets, butlers and aristocrats. They 'talk' - holy cow! In addition to these anachronisms, there is a wax portrayal of Henry V and his six wives - who never visited the castle. If I am not wrong the Warwick Castle was or is owned by the Madame Tussaud's company:

Wax sculpture of Queen Elizabeth II:

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Last summarizing note: The grounds at Warwick Castle extend to over 24280 sqm. You can walk the towers & ramparts but this can be quite exhausting as some towers have over 500 winding steps to climb. Mind you the views from atop the towers is awesome! Again elderly, infirm or heart condition persons should think twice before doing the walk. The numerous stairs / hills make it very much harder for disabled / infirm persons to access all parts of the Castle.

The Peacock Garden, Pageant Field and the Conservatory lie in the north-west side of the Castle's Park. They are quite close to the main Castle building. The conservatory was built in 1786 and still functions today as a glasshouse for exotic plants.

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The Conservatory and St. Mary Church in the background:

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Immediately in front of the Conservatory is the Peacock Garden. Prince Albert and Queen Victoria were involved in the planting of trees here and you can see Victoria’s thriving oak tree close to the driveway.

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History in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

History in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Beyond the Peacock Garden, stretching down to the river is the Pageant Field.

In the south-west corner of the huge Warwick Castle park - stands the Woodland Lodge. The themed Lodge is designed as a Knight's Village, set in a picturesque woodland grove on the Avon river. Expensive, luxury accommodation. Take photos of the Avon river near the Woodland Lodges:

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The Birds of Prey Mews are adjacent to the Woodland Lodge. 

Bald Eagle:

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Verreaux's Eagle Owl:

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We head now, to the Mound. The Mound  was built on the orders of William the Conqueror and formed the backbone of the Castles defense in the early years. Military advances saw The Mound lose its importance as a defensive position and in the 17th century it was incorporated into landscape planning and became part of the scenery rather than a key part of the structure at Warwick. The climb up to the Mound top is quite demanding BUT, the views are extremely rewarding. From the top of the Mound you can see as far as Stratford upon Avon.

View of the Birds of Prey Demonstration grounds from the Mound:

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View of Avon river and the Kingmaker Island from the Mound:

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History in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

View of Trebuchet from the Mound:

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View of the Inner Court from the Mound:

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View of the Inner Court from the Mound. On the right side: the Time Tower:

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View of Warwick roofs and St. Mary Church from the Mound:

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In the Time Tower you'll find audio visual multimedia experience capturing the essence of Warwick Castle’s rich and vibrant history!

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History in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

A bit north to the Mound lies the Birds of Prey Lawn - where the Birds of prey Display takes place twice, daily: 12.30 and 14.30:

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Guy Tower stands on the north-east corner of Warwick Castle. Guy’s Tower also dates from the 14th Century. Guy’s is built of five stories and reaches 40 m. The Tower contains a sitting room and two side rooms as well as offering defensive shooting positions from its twelve sided construction. Again, the ascent, through approx. 100 stairs is quite difficult:

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Inner Court from Guy Tower:

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From Guy Tower you can see the most beautiful panoramas around:

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History in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

History in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

History in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

History in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Not to be missed on any visit to Warwick Castle is the Victorian Rose Garden. The garden was first planted in the 1860s. Sadly, it was paved over and replaced by two tennis courts in the 1940s. Drawings of the original gardens were discovered in the 1980s and work began to restore the Victorian Rose Garden to its former grandeur. There are roses in bloom throughout most of the summer, but, as any gardener will tell you, the best time to visit is late June and throughout July. Keep an eye out for the new English rose ‘Warwick Castle’. David Austin named one of his English Roses 'Warwick Castle' to celebrate the reopening of the Victorian rose garden at Warwick Castle in 1986.

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My final word about this magic castle: the term "Roses" appears twice: history is fluent with "War of Roses". I hope, our present and future are more oriented to the "Roses Garden".

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