Salty Portsmouth - the great waterfront city

JUN 21,2016 - JUN 21,2016 (1 DAYS)

United Kingdom

1 DAYS

Citywalk

Portsmouth:

Main Attractions: Gunwarf Quays Shopping Centre,Spinnaker Tower, Square Tower, Victoria Pier, Nelson Statue, Old Garrison Church, Spur Redoubt, Clarence Pier, Southsea Common, Portsmouth Naval Memorial, Blue Reef Aquarium, Southsea Castle, Pyramids Centre, Southsea Rock Gardens, Old Portsmouth, Queens Hotel, Portsmouth Museum, Portsmouth Cathedral, Bath Square, Historic Dockyards (allow a special day !), HMS Warrior, HMS Mary Rose, Action Stations, HMS Victory.

Start & End: Portsmouth Harbour railway station.

Introduction:

Centrally located on the South coast of England. It is the United Kingdom's only island city. Located mainly on Portsea Island, 103 km south-west of London and 31 km south-east of Southampton. Portsmouth benefits from excellent local and regional transport connections. The M275 provides an onward northerly connection to London in around 1.5 hours. Southampton can be reached in around half an hour, via the M27, while Chichester is just a 25 minute drive away via the A27. For travel by train, Portsmouth Harbour Station is with regular services to London Victoria, London Waterloo, Bristol Parkway and Brighton. Portsmouth is a vibrant waterfront city with kilometers of beautiful waterfront, which boasts an un-rivalled array of leisure attractions, with everything from award-winning museums to impressive live music venues. Hosting the famous historic Dockyards. Portsmouth residents delight the shopping opportunities, with the extensive Gunwharf Quays outlet offering over 90 designer stores, alongside a wide selection of bars, restaurants and coffee shops.

Itinerary: The Portsmouth Harbour station is located between the Gunwharf Quays shopping centre and the Historic Dockyard. It is located 1.6 km. west to the Portsmouth and Southeast station. From the Portsmouth Harbour railway station - we turn right (North-east) and walk along the the Station approach (busy with construction works, dust and noise) until we hit the Hard avenue. The steel screens may hinder sights of the beautiful pier on your left. While walking along the Station Approach - on your left are the Gunwharf Quays (you see a big sign of Gosport Ferries) with ferry services to Gosport and the Isle of Wight.

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On leaving station we turn right and followed road round to Gunwharf Quays. When you hit the Hard - you see a big sign with detailed instructions for non-locals and tourists. Turn right and enter an underway (on your right public services) leading to the Gunwarf Quays Shopping Centre. Gunwharf Quays is home to over 90 premium retail outlet stores. If you want even more from your visit to Gunwharf Quays then there’s Vue Cinema, Bowlplex, a 24-hour health and fitness club, a contemporary art gallery and a nightclub and casino. There are many good eateries and coffee spots in this complex. It's worth a visit ONLY for the views around the mall.

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After walking 150 m. along the manicured avenue of shops -

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turn right to the Spinnaker Tower. Here, along the quays, it is wonderful to sit by the quay-side and admire the numerous boats not to forget the busy ferries sailing to and from Portsmouth. Really something for everyone and beautiful if you catch a nice day ! A must visit at Portsmouth.

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Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

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The 170-metre Spinnaker Tower is the centrepiece of the redevelopment of Portsmouth Harbour. it is one of the tallest accessible structures in the United Kingdom outside London. It was designed by local firm HGP Architects and engineering consultants Scott Wilson and built by Mowlem. The tower reflects Portsmouth's maritime history and was opened on 18 October 2005. The tower is owned by Portsmouth City Council, but operationally it is managed by a private company - Continuum Leading Attractions, a cultural attractions group based in York. Continuum also runs five other visitor attractions across the UK. Following a commercial sponsorship deal with Dubai-based Emirates airline, the tower was renamed the Emirates Spinnaker Tower in July 2015. Its unique design was accomplished by using two large, white, sweeping metal arcs, which give the tower its spinnaker sail design. At the top is a triple observation deck, providing a 360° view of the city of Portsmouth. The highest of the three observation platforms, the Sky Deck, has only a wire mesh roof. A glass floor is located on the first viewing deck at 100 metres above sea level. The tower was to be repainted in a red and white colour scheme—similar to that of local football rivals Southampton F.C. But following a petition with over 10,000 signatures, Portsmouth City Council decided to consider a change: the new design, unveiled on 19 June 2015, featured a blue, gold and white colour scheme. Opening hours: Summer: 10.00 - 18.00, Winter: 10.00 - 17.30. Prices: Adult - £9.95, Senior, Student - £8.95, Child (+3 yrs old) - £7.95, Children (-3 yrs old) - free, Family - £33. Online booking (https://www.spinnakertower.co.uk/booking/): -15% discount (15% saving does not apply to Family Ticket). You can save £5 by buying joint ticket for the Emirates Spinnaker Tower and Portsmouth Historic Dockyards. If you can’t see the three Solent Forts on the day of your visit, you may return for free within three months. Since, you can return and visit again and again with the same ticket - you are advised to return before sunset. Sundown is the best time to visit the tower. The sunset over the Isle of Wight is spectacular! There are three decks in the tower: deck on. It only takes about 20 seconds to get up to the top in the lift. If you suffer with heights - keep away from the glass floor in the first view deck:

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The view through the glass floor of the tower:

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Express lift takes you to the first of the three view decks. You are 100 metres above sea level. From there you get stunning panoramic views. A glass floor to walk across. The first Deck:

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Third Deck:

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Go down from the tower and start walking eastward. You can catch a wonderful sight of the Gunwarf Quays front from the tower entrance:

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A bit west to the tower - stands this small sculpture, and, here starts a GREY walking trail. You just follow the GREY TILES with the WAVE SIGN. Three kilometres of promenade now link all of Portsmouth’s historic waterfront. The route starts on The Hard and ends at the Spur Redoubt near Clarence Pier, Southsea, taking in Old Portsmouth, the Camber and Gunwharf Quays. The route is indicated by a chain motif set into the surface, symbolising partnership between the communities of Portsmouth and Gosport and between past and present. Historically it also refers to the chain, which used to be tightened across the harbour entrance at times of potential attack. The walk from the trendy Gunwharf Quays is a very pleasant one with lovely sea views, and it leads to the less trendy traditional seaside attractions of Clarence Pier, and a range of interesting historical monuments, museums and Aquarium. Interpretive panels along the way give insight into Portsmouth's fascinating evolution, from its stone towers and fortifications to Clarence Pier. There are some pretty ornamental gardens along Clarence Esplanade further on and the green open spaces of the Southsea Common create a very attractive and relaxing aspect:

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With your back to the tower - you cross the bridge. This is the view on your left:

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On your right:

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After walking along the bridge - look backward for another wonderful sights of the Spinnaker Tower:

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Beyond the bridge, on our left (west) - a private property land:

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The grey path changes to white. On our right is the WightLink Ticket Office. When you arrive to an asphalted road (Gunwharf Rd.) - turn RIGHT. After 100 m. walking (road name changes to White Hart) you see a demolished small dockyard full with junkies. Here you find another public toilet services. On your right, beyond the water - the The Bridge tavern:

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Take the first road to the RIGHT (no name. sign to: Round Tower and Bath Square).

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Take the first turn to the LEFT. We are, now, in Broad Street. On our left is the Square Tower. Continue, passing the sculpture with our face to the south. Climb the stairs and walk along the promenade (Saluting Platform). With your face to the NORTH - you see, again, the Square Tower. DO NOT WALK NORTHWARD - the promenade is blocked to the north !!!:

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The Square Tower was built in 1494 during the reign of Henry VII. It was designed as part of the fortifications to protect the rapidly expanding Naval Port. Together with the Round Tower, the adjacent sea-wall and the Saluting Platform are the only parts of the Tudor works to survive. The tower was also used as the home of the Governor of Portsmouth, a semaphore signalling tower, a provisions store for the Royal Navy and as a gunpowder store. Towards the end of the 16th or early 17th century the tower was adopted for use as a magazine and it was during this time that the tower was involved in a civil war incident. During the English Civil War 1642-1649 the Square Tower was used as an arsenal and contained large amounts of gunpowder and munitions. The Town of Portsmouth was under siege with the Royalist forces trapped inside the town by the Roundhead forces. This historic setting is used, nowadays, for wedding venues, business meetings, product launches, fairs, art exhibitions and workshops. In fact the Square Tower is one of the most popular Hampshire Wedding venues...

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We concentrate, now, around the Old part of Portsmouth. Amazing area, full of history, and brilliant architecture, and cobbled streets, takes you back in time. Highly recommended. It is very pretty and as you walk around the cobbled streets you can feel the history and imagine the sailors being pressed ganged onto the ships. Walk along the Sea Wall and see the old battlements and towers. The council have put interesting plaques around to explain what you are looking at.
So, we head southward along the naval walls and the promenade. On our right - fishermen sitting on the old Victoria Pier:

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Victoria Pier is a small shingle beach sheltered by the historic fortifications of Portsmouth. Stay walking on the raised platform. This beach can sometimes be affected by heavy wash from passing ships and the current here at times is fierce:

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On your left (east) is Nelson statue (Royal Garrison Church is looming behind). In year 1805, Admiral Nelson left Portsmouth to command the fleet that defeated the Franco-Spanish at the Battle of Trafalgar. Before departing, Nelson told the crew of the HMS Victory (see below) and workers in the dockyard that "England expects every man will do his duty". The Royal Navy's reliance on Portsmouth led to it becoming the most fortified city in the world. Prime Minister Lord Palmerston led a programme to defend British military bases from an inland attack. The forts were nicknamed "Palmerston's Follies" due to the fact that their armaments were pointed inland and not out to sea. From 1808 the Royal Navy's West Africa Squadron, tasked with stopping the slave trade, operated out of Portsmouth.

Leave the raised platform (the Saluting Platform), head to the east and walk down the stairs. The Nelson Statue is a gem, there are cafe's and pubs to stop and have a break, and if you are lucky you will see a Navy Ship either going out or coming in. The inscription in front of the statue says: "21 OCTOBER 1805". On the steps: "HERE SERVED HORATIO NELSON
YOU WHO TREAD HIS FOOTSTEPS REMEMBER HIS GLORY". The statue of Lord Admiral Horatio Nelson - wearing the uniform he wore when leaving Portsmouth for Trafalgar stands on the spot where the Vice-Admiral took his last steps on dry land on his way to board the battleship, HMS Victory. Horatio Nelson took an unusual route to the beach that day to avoid the huge crowds that had gathered in the High Street to see their hero off to battle. Leaving via the back door from The George Hotel in the High Street, where he'd spent the night, Nelson headed along Pembroke Road, and cut across the green past the Garrison Church through to the ramparts. The crowds soon realized the route he'd taken and came down to the Spur Redoubt (see below) to wish him farewell. It's believed that he commented to one of his aids that he wished he had two arms to shake them all by the hand (of course he only had the one!). The location of the statue of Lord Nelson had been the subject of some controversy for many years. He was originally placed in Pembroke Gardens so that he looked towards that part of Southsea Beach where it is believed that he embarked for his flagship HMS Victory in September 1805.  Whilst discussing the new location for the statue, it is said that regard was had for the route that Nelson took from the George Hotel, where he had breakfasted that September morning in 1805, to the beach from where he was ferried to the Victory. The route itself had been the subject of much debate over the years. The new location for the statue is several hundred yards from any point on Nelson's last walk. A month later, on 21st October 1805, at the height of the Battle of Trafalgar where the British fleet defeated the French and the Spanish he was struck by a French sniper's bullet on the frigate Redoubtable and later died. Portsmouth was the last dry land Lord Nelson stepped on and the last English city he ever saw:

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Pass the monument of Nelson, walk along the road and visit the Old Garrison Church If time allows. Free Entry. Open: 11.00 - 16.00, Tuesday to Saturday, from April until October. Old or Royal Garrison Church was built in about 1212 by the Bishop of Winchester as part of a hospital and hostel for pilgrims. In 1540, after the Reformation, the building was used as an ammunition store, and it started to decay. In 1559 the great Elizabethan project to build up the defences at Portsmouth began. The medieval hospital became part of the governor’s house, where two significant events in the history of the site took place. These were the marriage of Charles II to Catherine of Braganza in 1662 and the grand receptions held in June 1814 to celebrate the defeat of Napoleon at the Battle of Leipzig and his subsequent abdication. The receptions were attended by the Prince Regent, the Emperor of Russia, the King of Prussia and his general, Field-Marshal Blücher, the great ally of Arthur Wellesley, Duke of Wellington.  The church was restored in the 19th century, and although the nave was badly damaged in a 1941 firebomb raid on Portsmouth, the chancel is still roofed and furnished. Fine 20th-century stained-glass windows depict scenes from the Second World War and from the church’s own history:

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The church consists, originally, of a nave with north and south aisles, and the south porch. The chancel consists of the choir and sanctuary. The choir has two south doors, one of which leads to the stairs up to the bell turret, and the other to the exterior:

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To the north is the vestry. The thick lower section of the south wall is part of the original construction. Above this there are three restored lancet windows and a series of corbels serving as beam supports. The south porch and the west wall were both built in the 1860s, as the church had been shortened by one bay in the 1580s. The chancel features an elaborate vaulted roof with decorative bosses. The east window of three lancets with a the foiled head is an original feature and inspired Street’s restoration of the other windows. The oak stalls of the 1870s are dedicated as memorials to the nation’s most famous sailors and soldiers, beginning with Horatio Nelson and the Duke of Wellington:

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Antique Ford car opposite the Royal garrison Church:

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From the the Royal (Old) Garrison Church head south, turn right, turn left and arrive to the Spur Redoubt. Spur Redoubt is the remains of a small triangular fort, built in 1680 by Bernard de Gomme, Military engineer to Charles II to defend the mouth of Portsmouth harbour. Originally constructed as part of Portsmouth's fortifications, this work was rebuilt in stone and transformed into a powerful battery. The guns mounted along the southern face of the Spur Redoubt supported the King's counter-guard but also guarded against enemy ships.

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We continue walking south-east along the coast until we arrive to Clarence Pier and its adjacent amusement park ( a bit run-down, Wimpy Express fast food restaurant inside):

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Nearby, the point where Lord Nelson left the land and entered the sea on his way to the Trafalgar battle:

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Opposite Clarence Pier, on the coast, departure point of the Hovercraft to the Isle of wight:

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Beyond the amusement park and further south-east resides the huge Southsea Common. Southsea Common is parallel to the shore from Clarence Pier to Southsea Castle. The Common owes its existence to the demands of the military in the early nineteenth century for a clear range of fire from the harbour defences at any enemy ships which dared to approach Portsmouth and its dockyard. The Common is a popular recreation ground, and also serves as the venue for a number of annual events, including the Southsea Show, Para Spectacular, Military Vehicle Show, Kite Festival and a variety of circuses including the Moscow State Circus and Chinese State Circus. It was also the place where fans of Portsmouth F.C. gathered to celebrate their victory in the 2008 FA Cup Final. In August 2010, a life-size model of an ultrasaurus dinosaur was erected on the common in conjunction with the Portsmouth's Aspex Gallery. The sculpture was destroyed by a fire, probably caused by an electrical fault, on 1 October 2010. Southsea Common was awarded Warburton's Best Picnic Spot in the South East in 2008, 2009 and 2010. 800 m. further walking along the Millennium Promenade (or Clarenace Esplanade) - you can't miss the most famous landmark in Southsea Common - the Portsmouth Naval Memorial, sometimes known as Southsea Naval Memorial, is a war memorial in Portsmouth beside Clarence Esplanade, between Clarence Pier and Southsea Castle. It is overlooking the Millennium Promenade (which, actually starts at the Portsmouth Dockyards and ends at the Southsea Castle), and is accessible at all times. After the First and Second World Wars, an appropriate way had to be found of commemorating those members of the Royal Navy who had no known grave, the majority of deaths having occurred at sea where no permanent memorial could be provided. Panels were recently  being erected to help raise awareness of First and Second World War casualties in the UK. Portsmouth Naval Memorial commemorates around 10,000 sailors of the First World War and almost 15,000 of the Second World War:

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Continue walking south-east along the promenade. 320 m. from the Naval Memorial you arrive to the Blue Reef Aquarium. Here, the asphalted path changes to gravel one. Open:  everyday except Christmas Day from 10.00 - 17.00. Last Admission: 16.00. Prices: adult -  £10.50 (online - £9.00), Junior (age 3 - 12 years, must be accompanied by an adult) £8.25 (£6.75), Seniors & Students £9.50 (£8.50),
Family of 4 (2 standard and 2 junior) £35.50 (£31.50), Under 3's Free. Online tickets: http://www.bluereefaquarium.co.uk/portsmouth/plan-your-visit/admission-prices/ It might be an enjoyabe place for children. For adults - don't expect so much. I found this place boring and overpriced. Reasonable fish & chips restaurant inside:

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Beyond the Aquarium building, still on the Millennium Promenadae,  we see, on our left, the Bandstand Fields, which forms a natural amphiteatre looking out to  sea. Our signposts are the Millennium Motif Columns:

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500 m. further to the south - we arrive to the Southsea Castle. Admission to Southsea Castle is FREE. Southsea Castle is open APR - OCT:  TUE - SUN, and Bank Holiday Mondays, 10.00 - 17.00. Closed on Mondays (except for Bank Holidays). Built in 1544, the Castle is part of a series of fortifications constructed by Henry VIII around England's coasts to protect the country from naval invaders (from France and the Holy Roman Empire). Henry VIII's flagship, the Mary Rose, tragically sank in front of the Castle. During the English Civil War, nearly a century later, the Castle was captured for the only time in its history, by Parliamentarian forces. Over the centuries, Southsea Castle's defenses were strengthened so that it could continue to protect Portsmouth. In the 19th Century a tunnel was built to defend the Castle moat. Visitors can still enter the tunnel and see how the Castle would have been defended against invaders. The Castle has had many other uses besides defense. For a while it was a military prison. A lighthouse was built in the 1820s, and is still in use by shipping today. Southsea Castle was obsolete in the post-war years and in 1960 it was acquired by Portsmouth City Council, which restored the Castle to its 19th Century appearance. We surround the Castle from the south and follow the path leading north-east. Climb to one of the adjacent hills, overlooking the Castle for having an impressive sight of the Henry VIII's moated castle and its inner "The Courtyard" cafe' and its square central keep, its two rectangular gun platforms to the east and west, and two angled bastions to the front and rear. The castle houses a collection of cannons:

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The path (Clarence Esplanade, Southsea Seafront) continues to the EAST and changes to be asphalted again. 320 m. further, along the path, to the east is the Pyramids Centre. Pyramids is Portsmouth’s largest leisure centre. It includes a gym, fitness studio and spa, plus great water play for families and a three-level soft play adventure world filled with mazes, climbing nets and ball pits. Open: MON - THU 6.30 - 22.00, FRI 6.30 - 21.00, SAT - SUN 8.00 - 18.00.

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Next to the Pyramids Centre are Southsea Rock Gardens, a popular sun-trap (It's sheltered from the sea breeze) with many places to sit and relax. It's a great place to visit with children or to sit quietly alone. It is a marvelous garden and there is, always, a blooming attraction. There are many Lilies with beautiful burst of color:

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Here, I dined in Rocksbys Fish and Chips restaurant, in the middle of the rock garden (see below).

From the Southsea Rock Garden -  head north for 60 m., turn right toward S Parade for 75 m. and continue to follow S. Parade for 320 m. - going through 1 roundabout. We cross the Southsea Common from east to west. WE ENTER, NOW, the OLD PORTSMOUTH area. Try to catch the Serpentine Road in its most northern end. On your right is the Queens Hotel. This classy hotel looks impressive and aristocratic from the outside and you can't miss it while walking along the Southsea Common. The original Queen's hotel was known as Southsea House and was built by the architect Augustus Livesay, in 1861. It was then a large private house owned by Sir John and Lady Morris and was later transformed into one of the first hotels in Southsea by William Kemp Junior, this is when it became known as the Queen's Hotel. In the late 18th century the Queen's Hotel had a yacht club that stood behind it called the Royal Albert and was also surrounded by woods, which were then called Stone Woods. It was destroyed by fire in 1891. It was rebuilt in 1903 by the architect T.W.Cutler into the splendid building that stands today, complete with its Edwardian baroque style in brown terracotta:

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We continue north-west along Duisburg way until it ends in an extensive roundabout. We turn right (north-East) to Pier Road, Continue along Bellvue Terrace, Jubilee Terrace and Kings Terrace. Arriving to a square - we take the left wing, the Museum Road (north-west), A big sign in the square signifies the border between Portsmouth and Southsea. On our right is the Ravelin Park. 150 m. from the square, along the Museum Road - you see, on your left the Portsmouth Museum, 1 Museum Road. Free. Open: APR - SEP: 10.00 - 17.30, OCT - MAR: 10.00 - 17.00. Open: TUE-SUN and Bank Holiday Mondays. Closed on Mondays (except Bank Holidays). A lovely building. Recommended tea shop inside with delicious food, reasonably priced. Lots to see in the various galleries and well worth a visit.

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The main exhibition is Edward King paintings. It is interesting to see his paintings of the bomb damage of Portsmouth city in the aftermath of the WW2 Blitz:

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Memorabilia:

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Organ year 1842:

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Portsmouth Harbour Breeze, 1852, John Callow (1822-1878):

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Stork Fountain, 1872:

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There is a permanent exhibit describing Sherlock Holmes time in Portsmouth where Sir Conan Doyle wrote his first Sherlock Holmes novel, lived and worked as a physician. But it also covers his time after he left Portsmouth and the movies and the various actors who played Holmes on screen and stage:

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Postcard of Sherlock Holmes and Professor Moriarty falling into the Reichenbach Falls, with a small phial attached containing earth from the Reichenbach Falls:

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With our back to the museum - we continue left (north-west) along the Museum Road until the next square. Here, we turn LEFT (south-west) to the High Street. Before we turn left. from the square, on your right, is the stunning Portsmouth Grammer School - a leading co-educational day school renowned for excellent teaching, superb pastoral care and co-curricular opportunities. Founded in 1732 as a boys' school, it has become one of the top independent schools in the UK - consistently ranking highly in national reviews of teaching quality and examination results. It is widely regarded as the best school in the area. Do not miss the school premises and its wonderful, small gardens !

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In the High Street - note, on your right (your face to the west) the house of John Pounds. John Pounds a Portsmouth cobbler began teaching poor children without charging fees in 1818, unknowingly leading to a revolution in the British education system. Thomas Guthrie built upon Pounds' idea of free schooling for working class children and started a ragged school in Edinburgh. Ragged schools were charitable organizations dedicated to the free education of destitute children in 19th-century Britain. The schools were developed in working-class districts of the rapidly expanding industrial towns. John Pounds (June 17, 1766 – January 1, 1839) was a teacher and altruist born in Portsmouth, and the man most responsible for the creation of the concept of Ragged schools. After Pounds' death, Thomas Guthrie (often credited with the creation of Ragged Schools) wrote his Plea for Ragged Schools and proclaimed John Pounds as the originator of this idea. Many years after his death, John Pounds has become a local hero in his birthplace of Portsmouth, winning a "Man of the Millennium" award in 1999 from a local newspaper, ahead of nationally more famous local heroes including Admiral Lord Nelson and Charles Dickens. Again, a wonderful small garden is unmissable in this house:

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At High Street #119, sample the Duke of Buckingham Pub (see Tip below):

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We cross Pembroke Road on our left and Lombard Street on our right. Immediately, on our right (north) is the impressive Portsmouth Cathedral with very modern and impressive interior space:

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Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

In the (western) end of High Street - we turn RIGHT (north) to the Broad Street and connect with the waterfront promenade. Turn left onto West St, turn right to stay on West St and continue onto Bath Square. One of the main attraction of Old Portsmouth. A fantastic square to look around and buy something  different or sip a coffee. Here, you get a wonderful sight of the old harbour. There is a quirky and secret beach behind the walls.There are splendid bars and pubs around. Portsmouth International Port is your gateway to France, Spain, the Channel Isles and the Isle of Wight. It's perfectly positioned just off the M275, providing quick and easy access for ferries, cruise and cargo. The Port is the best-connected in Britain with the most routes to France, Spain and the Channel Islands. If you're considering a hop across the English Channel from Portsmouth to France, you can choose to visit Caen, Cherbourg, Le Havre or St Malo. Head a little further on to Spain and you have the choice of Bilbao or Santander. You can also take a much shorter trip on the car ferry from Portsmouth to the Isle of Wight. Clocking in at around an hour, this journey is the most frequently run from the port, carrying around three million passengers every year. Portsmouth International Port is also on some of the main cruise routes across Europe, linking the city with numerous others across Germany, the Netherlands, Ireland and Scotland. With the port being slightly smaller in size than that of Southampton, the cruise liners that call in here are small to medium-sized. This provides a more personal and bespoke offering that many passengers appreciate. Of course, the cruise liners are as breath-taking as the cities they visit - with size no indicator of luxury. The port benefits from a new terminal building which has a light and airy feel. This space and comfort adds to the thrill of the holiday and the overall passenger experience. As you'd expect, the main concourse offers everything you'd need whilst you await departure. Alongside the check in area is a Travel Exchange and shop, while up on the mezzanine floor there is a Costa coffee shop and bar. On warm summer days you can enjoy the relaxing outdoor terrace, where you can look out over the Port before setting sail. Portsmouth International Port does more than just holiday excursions - it's also a dynamic commercial port which imports most of the bananas eaten in the UK. Alongside the International Port, regular ferries also run from the south of the city to the Isle of Wight (car ferry, passenger catamaran and hovercraft) and Gosport (passenger only).

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

The old harbour near the Bridge Tavern:

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

We retrace our steps. Head south on Bath Square toward Bathing Ln, continue onto West St, turn left to stay on West St, turn right onto Broad St for 160 m. Turn left onto White Hart. Continue along Gunwharf Road (do not turn left to the Spinnaker Tower). In the end of Gunwharf Road - turn LEFT (north) to St. George Road. A brown sigh point left to the Historic Dockyards. Before crossing the Park Street - you see, on your left the Tesco Express supermarket and the Holiday Inn Express hotel. We continue north-west along St George Rd - crossing Victory Rd and College St on our right. Continue along the Hard and the Main street, passing Portsmout Harbour Railway Station on our left.In case you have, at least, free 2 hours to spend in the historic dockyards - better buy all attraction ticket. This gives you access to HMS Warrior, HMS Victory and the Mary Rose and much more besides, including several other notable boats and museums. You can buy an online 'voucher' which you have to exchange for a ticket before gaining entry (https://tickets.historicdockyard.co.uk/WebStore/shop/ViewItems.aspx?CG=PHD&C=AAT). Prices: Adult - £26.40, Child (5 -15 years) - £18.40, Senior (60+) - £23.00, Student - £23.00. As the the prices are quite expensive - allow a lot of time to spend in the dockyards. YOUR TICKET IS GOOD FOR ONE CALENDAR YEAR. It is a wonderful and exceptional experience ! It is a GREAT PLACE and there is so much to see around (and do). Many visitors spend there one or two full days. This is almost a set of different museums which is almost impossible to fully appreciate in one day.

Further, we see, on our left the HMS Warrior and the HMS Mary Rose ships. In a sunny day - you'll see only the silhouettes of these ships. This is only the first part of the Historic Dockyards. The Historic Dockyard is a great place to experience 800 years of naval history surrounded by working docks and historic buildings. HMS Warrior is open: APR - OCT: 10.00 - 17.30, last entry is 17.00. NOV- MAR: 10.00 - 17.00, last entry is 16.30. Prices: Pay once, visit all year. Book online and save 20% (http://www.historicdockyard.co.uk/tickets-and-offers). Adults: £18.00, Concessions and Family Tickets Available. There may be occasions when access to some areas on board Warrior may be restricted or closed to the public for all or part of the day. You can walk around on your own and really explore almost the whole ship. The ship has many different areas of interest and volunteers are always on hand to provide information. A wonderful experience in a sunny day. The fastest, largest and most powerful warship in the world when she was launched. Such was her reputation that enemy fleets were intimidated by her obvious supremacy and deterred from attacking Britain at sea - yet she never fired a shot in anger. ALLOW, AT LEAST 45 minutes, for visiting every ship. Expensive admission prices:
Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

The Mary Rose is a Tudor ship, built in 1510. In service for 34 years. he Mary Rose is the only 16th century warship on display anywhere in the world. The ship was raised from the Solent in 1982. Its dramatic story is now revealed in full inside the purpose-built, award-winning museum, which opened its doors to visitors in May 2013. Sank in 1545. Discovered in 1971. Raised in 1982. Now in the final stages of conservation, it takes her place in a stunning and unique museum. You can now get stunning views of King Henry VIII's one true love from all nine galleries and explore thousands of Tudor treasures. Open: NOV - MAR: 10.00 - 17.00 (last entry 16.15), APR-OCT: 10.00 - 17.30, (last entry 16.45). Closed 24th-26th December. The ship is in its final stage of conservation. Price: Adults £18.00, Concessions and Family Tickets Available. In the adjacent museum you get a unique insight into the life of crew members on a busy warship in 1545, with thousands of atrtifacts, including personal belongings such as wooden bowls, leather shoes, musical instruments and nit combs, and many of the ship’s weapons. AN ABSOLUTELY AMAZING EXPERIENCE !

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Entering the main site of the Historic Dockyards - you see, on your right the Action Stations. Action Stations is a high-tech, interactive collection of activities for young and old. housed in Boathouse 6. The boathouse itself was built between 1845 and 1848, and like the technology it now features inside, it was once at the forefront of design and innovation in the Victorian era: it was constructed in the 1840s and was one of the first examples of a brick building erected around an internal metal frame. Enclosed complex with with lots of activities (laser quest, climbing wall, shooting simulators, shooting games, Ninja Force, driving boats, aircraft and tanks) to keep children and adults occupied and challenges. There is an indoor picnic area at the rear of the venue. It is necessary to purchase a Portsmouth Historic Dockyard Site Ticket to use any facility in Action Stations. Open: every day (except Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and Boxing Day), APR-OCT:  10.00 - 17.30, NOV-MAR – 10.00 - 17.00:

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

The most famous attraction in the historic dockyards is the HMS Victory. A wonderful example of a warship, and a great experience. HMS Victory was the flagship of Admiral Nelson at the Battle of Trafalgar, in 1805, and was the ship on which he met his death after being shot by a French sniper. Stunningly restored. The ship's colour scheme has been put back to the colours it wore at Trafalgar. It offers a fascinating insight into life at sea for the sailors of the time.Guided tour takes about an hour. Try to avoid hours with school parties. The interiors are quite rough and are difficult to manage. Keep your eyes on every step inside ! It's not a good tour for children , they can fall over and the dark places seem to be upsetting.DO NOT MISS THIS SHIP !

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

It is 500 m. back to Portsmouth Harbour Railway Station. Head southeast toward Main Rd, slight right onto Main Rd. Main Rd turns slightly right and becomes The Hard. You can turn to the left to the Queen Street, climb for 150-200 m. to have a glance at this complex:

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

At the roundabout, take the 1st exit onto Station Approach, turn right, turn left and Portsmouth Harbour will be on the left.

Food

Rocksbys Fish and Chips restaurant, Clarence Esplanade, Southsea:

A generous and excellent plate of Cod fish with potatoes and green peas: £8.95. Tasty, fresh. Don't expect fancy restaurant fare. Reasonable prices, clean and polite service. Nice decoration around. The restaurant is sectioned into two area, cafeteria style and then restaurant style with table cloths. You can sit outside: Small terrace on the promenade with sea view, The menu is fairly simple, offering everything from sandwiches to three course meals, with the addition of two roasts on a Sunday.

Food in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Food

Duke of Buckingham Pub, High Street #119, Old Portsmouth:

Splendid setting, pleasant pub, superb food, well served, kind and polite team. Expect generous and delicious portions. Recommended.

Food in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

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