Rome - From the Jewish Ghetto to Trastevere.

MAY 11,2014 - MAY 11,2014 (1 DAYS)

Italy

1 DAYS

Citywalk

From the Jewish Ghetto to Trastevere.

Start: Largo di Torre Argentina. Bus no. 492 (Cipro-Tiburina) (which passes through most of Rome highlights) stops opposite Largo di Torre Argentina.

End: Villa Farnesina or Lungotevere della Farnesina (on the Tiber river) or Ponte Palatino (Trastevere or Forum Boarium).

Duration: 1 busy day.

Distance: About 10-12 km (depending on your final location).

Orientation:  A VERY busy day. Trastevere is a charming, vibrant, colorful area and, you'll explore, through this itinerary, MANY pretty and atmospheric spots. Your time is very TIGHT. We've packed a lot of places, attractions, experiences and sights into one-day-trip !!! You can combine the Gianicolo Park/Hill in this day - but it looks to me TOO tight, complicated and strenuous. We shall devote another trip to Gianicolo Hill combined with Forum Boarium (Aventino) and another central part of Trastevere. If you complete the whole itinerary - it is almost a round tour.

Weather: Sunny or cloudy days. Avoid this itinerary in rainy or very hot days.

Largo di Torre Argentina square hosts four Republican Roman temples, and the remains of Pompey's Theatre. It is located in the ancient Campus Martius. The name of the square comes from the Torre Argentina, which takes its name from the city of Strasbourg, whose Latin name was Argentoratum. In 1503, the Papal Master of Ceremonies Johannes Burckardt, who came from Strasbourg and was known as "Argentinus", built in via del Sudario a palace (now at number 44), called Casa del Burcardo, to which the tower is annexed. The other tower in the square is not the one giving the name to the place, but the Medieval Torre del Papito ("Little Pope's Tower"), attributed by tradition to Antipope Anacletus II Pierleoni, allegedly not a tall person:

Largo di Torre Argentina, Temple A (to Juturna) in the distance, Temple B in the center, Temple C to the left. In the distant left, the Teatro Argentina:


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Temple A or Temple of Juturna:

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Temple B, devoted to Fortunae Huiusce Diei:

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Wide view showing conservation work in progress:

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Another 220 m., 5 minutes walk to the Turtle Fountain. Head east on Largo di Torre Argentina toward Via San Nicola Dè Cesarini, 36 m. Turn right onto Via San Nicola Dè Cesarini, 110 m. Continue onto Via Paganica, 71 m. You face the Turtle Fountain in Piazza Mattei. One of the most beautiful squares of Rome. The beauty of the Fontana delle Tartarughe is principally the fact that you can observe this beautiful late Renaissance masterpiece without wrestling with huge crowds of tourists as it is located in a relatively little-known, yet central neighborhood, the Jewish Ghetto. Around the edge of a circular vasque stand four bronze ephebes (young men), each with one foot on the head of a bronze dolphin. Bronze turtles are placed around the upper basin and were added at a later stage, during restoration. It was built between 1581 and 1588 by the architect Giacomo della Porta and the sculptor Taddeo Landini. The bronze turtles around the upper basin, usually attributed either to Gian Lorenzo Bernini or Andrea Sacchi, were added in either 1658 and 1659, when the fountain was restored:

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The Fontana delle Tartarughe is only a few steps from the ruins of the Portico d'Ottavia, a romantic archaeological gem, perfect for a stroll at sunset in the heart of the atmospheric Jewish Ghetto. Head south on Via di Sant'Ambrogio toward Via del Portico D'Ottavia, 87 m. Turn left onto Via del Portico D'Ottavia, 57 m. Here starts (north) the Jewish Ghetto. The term "Ghetto" is used to indicate the quarter lying between Piazza Mattei and the Tiber, between Monte dei Cenci and Teatro di Marcello. It as founded by Pope Paul IV Carafa in 1555 and abolished only in 1870, with the end of the Vatican Church State and the Unification of Italy. Yhe Ghetto was surrounded by a wall in which there were 3 gates , opened in the morning and closed at dusk. During the 17th century, around 9000-10000 inhabitants lived there in horrible sanitary conditions. Today, the hetto is one of Rome zones which, more than any other, has kept the atmosphere and flavors of Rome old city: authentic Roman-Jewish cooking:  coda alla vaccinara (braised oxtail "butcher" style), carciofi alla guidia (crisp-fried whole artichokes) etc'.

Make sure you stop at one of the pie shops for a sugar boost or plan to have breakfast/dinner in one of the typical Roman-Jewish trattorias for a mouthwatering array of fried artichokes, cod and pasta dishes.

The Forno Boccione, Via del Portico d'Ottavia 1 is a very popular bakery and shop for pastries, cakes and breads baked in the best Roman-Jewish tradition (permanent queue). If you get there early enough in the morning, you will find freshly fried donuts:

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Opposite the Bocccione (what a terrific smell in the air !) is the Piazza delle Cinque Scole:

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Wonderful wall friezes in the Via del Portico d'Ottavia in the Jewish Ghetto - immediately after the Boccione bakery:

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Ba'Ghetto (pricey, not recommended):

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Scuole Ebraiche di Roma "Renzo Levi":

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In the beginning of Portico d'Ottavia road, at Piazza Costagui stands this sculpture in (a rather neglected) cage - "Decor Carmeli e Saron":

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Another recommended Hostaria is the Giggeto, Via del Portico D'Ottavia 21/a-22:

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The Ghetto borders, in the south, the Lungotevere Cenci road (ring road along the Tiber river, which, changes its name, every hundreds of metres). Here stands the monumental building of the Sinagoga (Synagogue) built in 1904. Today, it is also the seat of the Museo Ebraiche of the Jewish community of Rome. The present Synagogue was constructed shortly after the unification of Italy in 1870, when the Kingdom of Italy captured Rome and the Vatican Papal State ceased to exist. The Roman Ghetto was demolished and the Jews were granted citizenship. The building which had previously housed the Ghetto synagogue (a complicated structure housing five schools in a single building - see, before, the Piazza delle Cinque Scholes) was demolished, and the Jewish community began making plans for a new and impressive building. Opening Hours: Shacharit: Weekday 07.45, Saturdays-Holidays 08.30. Mincha-Maariv: on time.

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The Jewish Museum of Rome, located in the monumental building of the Great Synagogue, was opened in 1960 to display the collections of the Jewish Community of Rome: Roman silverware from the 17th and 18th century, precious textiles from all over Europe. Open: From September 16 to June 15: Sunday – Thursday: from 10.00 to 16.15 (exit at 17.00), Friday: from 9.,00 to 13.15 (exit at 14,00). From June 16 to September 15: Sunday – Thursday: from 10.00 to 18.15 (exit at 19,00), Friday: from 10.00 to 15.15(exit at 16.00).

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we end our visit in the Ghetto at the end of Via Portico d'Ottavia - in Piazze Gersalemme.  Cross Lungotevere Cenci (through the cross-lights !) and cross the Tiber river by the bridge opposite: Ponte Fabricio (Fabricius Bridge). It is the oldest Roman bridge in Rome, Italy, still existing in its original state. Built in 62 BC, it spans half of the Tiber River, from the Campus Martius on the east side (we came from) to Tiber Island (Isola Tiberina) in the middle (the Ponte Cestius is west of the island).

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Most of the day's hours the bridge is packed with African sellers of colorful bags (made in Senegal). Personally, I think the bags are beautiful, practical and... cheap. From my and others experience - do not pay more than for 8 euros for a bag. A bargain.

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip Ponte Cestius (the western side of the whole bridge) is populated by young musicians:

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Both of the bridges connect the Jewish ghetto with the Isola Tiberina island and the island with the Trastevere quarter. Guarded by two marble pillars with two-faced Janus heads, the bridge is a symbol of transitions and beginnings, a place from where you can see the future and the past. The bridges are quite romantic in sunset hours.

Crossing the bridge and you come to the small island on the Tiber river - the Isola Tiberina.  The island has always been traditionally associated through the centuries with the healing of the sick. In fact, it is often also called the Stone Ship, an indirect reference to this very association. In 291 B.C., a terrible plague swept through the city of Rome, wiping out much of its population. The priests, after having consulted the Sybilline books, dispatched a delegation on a ship to Epidaurus, a small city in ancient Greece and site of a sanctuary to Aesculapius, to bring back a statue of this God of Medicine and Healing. The ambassadors returned bringing with them a serpent, an animal closely associated and dear to the God. On approaching the Tiber Island, according to the Roman Poet Ovid in his Metamorphoses, the serpent jumped ship and swam to the islet. Believing this was an incarnation of the God himself, a temple to Aesculapius was erected just where the serpent landed and the island was carved into the shape of a ship as a tribute to the occasion. Today the Aesculapius temple lies under the Church of San Bartelomeo (see below), a new basilica constructed by the Emperor Otto III in 998. In 1582, the Spanish monks of the Order of St. John Calibytis founded a hospital which is still fully operational today (west side of the island) . The island is boat-shaped, approximately 270 m long and 67 m wide, and has been connected with bridges to both sides of the river since antiquity:

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After crossing Ponte Fabricio we turn left to Piazza San Bartolomeo all'isola

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The Tiber river from Piazza San Bartolomeo all'isola:

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The Tiber river and Ponte Cestius from Piazza San Bartolomeo all'isola:

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You face the Façade of San Bartolomeo all'Isola Basilica on the Tiber Island. It was founded at the end of the 10th century by Otto III, Holy Roman Emperor. It contains the relics of St. Bartholomew the Apostle, on the site of the former temple of Aesculapius, which had cleansed the island of its former ill-repute among the Romans and established its reputation as a hospital, continued under Christian auspices today. The church was badly damaged by a flood in 1557 and was reconstructed, with its present Baroque façade, in 1624, to designs of Orazio Torriani. In 2000, the basilica was dedicated by Pope John Paul II to the memory of the new martyrs of the 20th and 21st century.

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In the center of the piazzetta before the church is a four-sided guglia with saints in niches by the sculptor Ignazio Jacometti, erected here in 1869.Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

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From this moment we start our visit at the Trastevere area. Its name comes from the Latin trans Tiberim, meaning literally "beyond the Tiber". The correct pronunciation is with the accent on the second syllable. Its logo is a golden head of a lion on a red background, the meaning of which is uncertain. 

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Nowadays, Trastevere maintains its character thanks to its narrow cobbled streets lined by medieval houses. At night, natives and tourists alike flock to its many pubs and restaurants, but much of the original character of Trastevere remains. The unique character of this neighborhood has attracted artists, foreign expats, and many famous people. In the sixties and seventies,

Cross Lungotevere degli Alberteschi and turn right along this street and, immediately, left onto Via della Gensola. See here how stylistically are the Italians are restoring or renovating facades of antique buildings:


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RETURN (retrace your steps !) along Via della Gensola (now, your face to the east), slight with this road to the right (SOUTH) and walk until its end - arriving to the Lungaretta.  We start strolling at the picturesque alleys of Trastevere. Turn right in Via della Lungaretta and LEFT (south) to Via della Luce. On your right you pass church of Santa Maria della Luce.
Turn left to Via dei salumi. Cross Via Anicia and and turn RIGHT to the narrow Vicolo dell'Atleta:

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Turn LEFT to Via dei Genovesi and, immediately, RIGHT to Via de Santa Cecilia.  A few steps and you face Piazza de Mercanti, Piazza Santa Cecilia  and Chiesa Santa Cecilia in Trastevere. A must-see when visiting Trastevere. The courtyard and church are beautifully maintained and the frescoes and statues inside-amazing! The first church on this site was founded probably in the 3rd century, by Pope Urban I; it was devoted to the Roman martyr Cecilia, martyred it is said under Marcus Aurelius Severus Alexander, by the late fifth century. Tradition holds that the church was built over the house of the saint. Pope Paschal I rebuilt the church in 822, and moved here the relics of St Cecilia from the catacombs of St Calixtus. More restorations followed in the 18th century. You'll appreciate the elegant, refreshing courtyard and the impressive friezes on the entrance of the church: serene garden with rose bushes and large Roman urn fountain.

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Frieze of Santa Cecilia:

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Among the artifacts remaining from the 13th century edifice are a mural painting depicting the Final judgment (1289-93) by Pietro Cavallini in the choir of the monks, and the ciborium (1293) in the presbytery by Arnolfo di Cambio. The Gothic ciborium is surrounded by four marble columns white and black, decorated with statuettes of angels, saints, prophets, and evangelists. The apse has remains of 9th century mosaics depicting the Redeemer with Saints Paul, Cecilia, Paschal I, Peter, Valerian, and Agatha. The absolutely spectacular mosaics in the apse take your breath away. Truly beautiful depictions of Jesus and saints, with gold halos, flowing robes, and calm faces. Beneath the human figures are a procession of lambs. The entire apse sparkles with these beautiful mosaics.

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The church contains two altarpieces by Guido Reni: Saints Valerian and Cecilia and a Decapitation of Saint Cecilia (1603):

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The ceiling of Cappella dei Ponziani was decorated God the Father with evangelists (1470) by Antonio del Massaro (Antonio da Viterbo or il Pastura).

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The Cappella delle Reliquie (dark) was frescoed and provided with an altarpiece by Luigi Vanvitelli. The nave is frescoed with the Apotheosis of Santa Cecilia (1727) by Sebastiano Conca.

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Among the most remarkable works is the graphic altar sculpture of St. Cecilia (1600) by the late-Renaissance sculptor Stefano Maderno - one of the most famous examples of Baroque sculpture:

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Everyday, including Sundays, you can listen to a vocal concert of the church's nuns (13.05). A different and moving experience. The whole visit in the church - is exceptional !

Go out to Piazza de Mercanti and soak the quiet, noble atmosphere around with its ancient, pretty buildings:

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Head south (right) to Via di San Michele. Turn right to the Via della Madonna dell'Orto

Chiesa di santa Maria dell'Orto:

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and then, left to Via Anicia. In its end - Piazza de San Francisco d'Assisi. On your left - Chiesa di San Francisco a Ripa with the tomb of Giorgio de Chirico - famous Italian painter:

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Continue northward in Via San Francisco a Ripa, cross the main road (Viale di Trastevere). Along the Via S.F.a.R you'll find many eateries. For a special restaurant I recommend walking until the end of this road, Via San Francisco a Ripa, arriving to Piazza di Santa Maria, continue a bit more northward and find the Osteria Der Belli, Piazza di Sant'Apollonia, 11 Open: 12.00 – 15.00, 19.00 – 23.00,near Hotel Santa Maria di Paolo Vetere.  (Note: we shall arrive very close to this restaurant, later, when we'll explore Piazza San Calisto and Piazza Santa Maria in Trastevere). In case you opted for this restaurant NOW - return southward to Via San Francisco a Ripa and continue south until you meet (on your right) the Via Natale del Grande. If you didn't dine in Osteria der Belli - turn from Via San Francisco a Ripa left (WEST) to Via Natale del Grande. Walk until the end of this road (westward) until you arrive to Piazza San Cosimato - full with restaurants and bars. During the weekdays (Mon-Sat) - this square is busy with food market (very popular in Rome), a traditional Roman open-air market.  Around are picturesque buildings in terracotta and orange tones, ancient churches, ever-new restaurants, and workaday stores. The cobblestone streets add to the charm, and the overhanging laundry lines impart a sort-of mystical (south-Italian) feeling to passersby:

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With your face northward, in the Piazza San Cosimato - there are two road heading to the north. Take the RIGHT one. It has no name, in its beginning, but you'll reveal its name after a couple of minutes walk - Via San Cosimato... - ending in Piazza San Callisto.  A wonderful square !

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Piazza San Callisto is named for the church that is located there, at the spot where Pope Callisto I, who was martyred during persecutions by the Emperor Alexander Severus, used to live. To the right of the church is the Palazzo San Callisto, (actually in Piazza Santa Maria in Trastevere) a huge complex, commissioned by Pope Pius XI and designed by Giuseppe Momo in 1936. The building was meant to have become the seat of the Congregazioni della Santa Sede, but this was moved to the Vatican itself in 1959. The complex consists of 4 buildings around a courtyard. In the courtyard is a statue of Pius himself. Across the road from the church (on no. 9) stands the Palazzo del Pozzo, which was built in the first half of the 16th century and in 1749 became property of the Conservatorio della Beata Vergine Maria, a “home for virginal and honest girls who wish to serve God and want to escape from the cruelty of their parents and husbands or have other reasons to fear for their own lives”.

San Callisto Church:

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A bit more to the north - Piazza Santa Maria in Trastevere.  The square in front of the basilica is one of the centres of Rome and Trastevere nightlife. The Fountain in Piazza Santa Maria in Trastevere is a believed to be the oldest fountain in Rome, dating back, according to some sources, to the 8th century. The present fountain is the work of Donato Bramante, with later additions by Gian Lorenzo Bernini and Carlo Fontana. The fountain was reconstructed between 1499 and 1500. Piazza di Santa Maria in Trastevere is a picturesque and lively square, so typical of Trastevere. Plenty of bars/restaurants and live music. It's homey square, charming, cozy, romantic, adventurous...:

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The Basilica di Santa Maria in Trastevere is one of the oldest churches of Rome, perhaps the first in which Mass was openly celebrated. Opening hours: 07.30-21.00.The basic floor plan and wall structure of the church date back to the 340s. The first sanctuary was built in 221 and 227 by Pope Callixtus I and later completed by Pope Julius I. Among those buried in the church are the relics of Pope Callixtus I, Pope Innocent II, Antipope Anacletus II.

The Romanesque campanile is from the 12th century. Near the top, a niche protects a mosaic of the Madonna and Child. The mosaics on the facade are believed to be from the 12th century. They depict the Madonna enthroned and suckling the Child, flanked by ten women holding lamps. This image on the facade showing Mary nursing Jesus is an early example of a popular late medieval and renaissance type of image of the Virgin.

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The present nave preserves its original (pre-12th century) basilica plan and stands on the earlier foundations. The 22 granite columns with Ionic and Corinthian capitals that separate the nave from the aisles came from the ruins of the Baths of Caracalla.

Inside the church are a number of late 13th-century mosaics by Pietro Cavallini on the subject of the Life of the Virgin (1291) centering on a "Coronation of the Virgin" in the apse. Domenichino's octagonal ceiling painting, Assumption of the Virgin (1617) fits in the coffered ceiling setting that he designed.

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In the dome, there is an opening or Oculus from which four putti emerge to carry a central tempietto, all of which frames a light-filled chamber above, illuminated by windows not visible from below.

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The fifth chapel to the left is the Avila Chapel designed by Antonio Gherardi. This, and his Chapel of S. Cecilia in San Carlo ai Catinari are two of the most architecturally inventive chapels of the late seventeenth century in Rome.

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With your back to the Basilica and your face to the north - leave the Piazza Santa Maria from the north-western exit. Turn LEFT twice to Via della Paglia:

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Walking in Via della Paglia turn on the second road to the RIGHT to Piazza Sant Egidio. Piazza S. Egidio is one of the magic places you can find in Trastevere. During the day (weekdays only) it is a really quiet place without cars. You can just hear people talking and eating. During the nights or on Sundays it is lovely and very vibrant with artistic touch !

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From Piazza Sant Egidio walk north to the Via della Scala which is full with cafe's and restaurants. Note the first house in this road to your left.

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At the end of Via della Scala - you see Porta Settimiana. Porta Settimiana is one of the gates of the Aurelian walls in Rome built by Emperor Aurelian in the 3rd century, traced in the area of Trastevere and climbing the Gianicolo Hill out of the Tiber. Porta Settimiana marks the start of Via della Lungara, the 16th-century road that connects Trastevere with the Borgo quarter. It was built in 1498 by Pope Alexander VI over a small passageway in the Aurelian Wall and later altered by Pope Pius VI in 1798.

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We turn right to Via di Santa Dorotea  which leads to Piazza Trilussa, a popular evening hang-out, and Ponte Sisto, which connects with Rome historical centre.

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On your left Chiesa San Dorotea:

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We trace our steps and return whole Via Santa Dorotea length back to Via della scala. We pass through Porta Settimiana to Via della Lungara. We pass John Cabot University - Guarini Campus on our right and turn LEFT to Via Corsini. Immediately, on your right - Corsini Gallery (Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica in Palazzo Corsini), Via della Lungara, 10. 

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Open times: Tuesday: closed. from Wednesday to Monday: from 08.30 to 19.30. Closed the 1st of January, 25th of December. Access up to half hour before the closing time Admission: 5 euros. Ticket valid for Barberini Palace and Corsini Gallery: full price € 9, reduced € 4,50 (valid for 3 days long). 18th-century mansion of former Pope Clemente XII filled with European Old Masters paintings. The Palazzo Corsini is a late-baroque palace  erected for the Corsini family between 1730-1740 as an elaboration of the prior building on the site, a 15th-century villa of the Riario family, based on designs of Ferdinando Fuga. During 1659-1689, the former Riario palace had hosted the eccentric Christina, Queen of Sweden, who abdicated, converted, and moved to Rome (statue of her stands in the Basilica St. Peter in the Vatican). Under her patronage, this was the site for the first meetings of the Roman "Academy of Arcadia" or "Academy of the Arcadians". It was an Italian literary academy founded in Rome in 1690. The full Italian official name was Pontificia Accademia degli Arcadi. Today, the palace hosts some offices of the National Academy of Science (Accademia dei Lincei) and the Galleria Corsini. The gardens, which rise up the Janiculum hill, are part of the Orto Botanico dell'Università di Roma "La Sapienza", a botanical garden. The majority of the major works in the Corsini Gallery collection were donated by the Corsini family, and initially were gathered by the avid 17th century collector, the cardinal Neri Maria Corsini, and added to by other members and from collections of Pope Clement XII and his nephew. In 1883, this palace and its contents were sold to the state, and the collection is displayed in its original location. The collection encompasses the breadth of mainly Italian art from early-Renaissance to late-18th century. It has both religious and historical works, as well as landscapes and genre paintings. It is unique in the sense that it is still intact today.

Nativity - Jacopo Bassano:

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Madonna of the Straw - Van Dyck:

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

St Sebastian cared for by the angels (1602-03) - Rubens:

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

The Orto Botanico dell'Università di Roma "La Sapienza" also known as the Orto Botanico di Roma, is a botanical garden operated by the Sapienza University of Rome. It is open Tuesday through Saturday, but closed entirely in August; an admission fee of 8 euros is charged. The garden was established on this site in 1883, although it is the successor to the Papal Botanical Gardens going back to the Renaissance. It is sited on the slopes of the Gianicolo Hill overlooking the 17th-century Palazzo Corsini. Today the garden contains more than 3,000 species, with a Japanese garden, bamboo groves, and a Giardino dei Semplici (over 300 species of medicinal plants).

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Return to Via della Lungara and continue a bit to enter, on your right the Villa Farnesina, Via della Lungara, 230. Many Romans claim that this gallery rivals Villa Borghese with the crowds typifying the last. It is a spectacular attraction. There is a whole suite of frescoed rooms, and a magnificent marble staircase. Do not expect crowds. You will be the only one or among very few other visitors here... You can feel fully immersed in the culture of the great Renaissance humanism and painting here. Villa Farnesina is one of the best and hidden gems of Rome. The villa was built for Agostino Chigi, a rich banker from Siena and the treasurer of Pope Julius II between 1506–1510. The novelty of this suburban villa design can be discerned from its differences from that of a typical urban palazzo (palace). Renaissance palaces typically faced onto a street and were decorated versions of defensive castles. This villa, intended to be an airy summer pavilion, presented a side towards the street and was given a U shaped plan. Open from Monday to Saturday from 09.00 to 14.00, closed on Sunday and holiday. Note: Special openings on the second Sunday of every month from 09.00 – 17.00 with guided tours.

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Chigi also commissioned the fresco decoration of the villa by artists such as Raphael, Sebastiano del Piombo, Giulio Romano, and Il Sodoma. Best known are Raphael's frescoes on the ground floor; in the loggia depicting the classical and secular myths of Cupid and Psyche,

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

and The Triumph of Galatea. This, one of his few purely secular paintings, shows the near-naked nymph on a shell-shaped chariot amid frolicking attendants and is reminiscent of Botticelli's The Birth of Venus:

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

In the adjoining bedroom of Agostino Chigi which is situated at the end of the building (It is known as the Room of the Marriage of Alexander the Great and Roxanna) and was decorated by Giovanni Antonio Bazzi, known as Il Sodoma. Il Sodoma (Giovanni Antonio Bazzi) painted scenes (1516 - 1517) from the life of Alexander the Great, the marriage of Alexander and Roxana, and Alexander receives the family of Darius:

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Detail of frescoes in the "Perspectives' Hall" by Baldassarre Peruzzi (who designed and erected the Villa):

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Fresco "Polifemo" - Sebastiano Luciani called "Del Piombo":

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Continue along the Via della Lungara to catch more sights of ancient houses and gardens. We had the opportunity to enter an Open House (10-11 May 2014) in one of this street's houses:

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Turn right to Salita del Buon Pastore and again RIGHT to Lungotevere della Farnesina. Catch a bus (no Metro here) or walk back EASTWARD along the Tiber river to connect with Rome into the walls.  You pass Ponte Sisto, Ponte Garibaldi and, again (we've been here in the morning), Ponte Fabricio:

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

From Ponte Fabricio - you can return to the Jewish Ghetto (remember ? a round itinerary !). Further to the east is The Pons Aemilius (Italian: Ponte Emilio), today called Ponte Rotto, is the oldest Roman stone bridge in Rome. Preceded by a wooden version, it was rebuilt in stone in the 2nd century BC. It once spanned the Tiber, connecting the Forum Boarium with Trastevere. A single arch in mid-river is all that remains today, lending the bridge its name Ponte Rotto ("Broken bridge"):

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , Italy, visiting things to do in Italy, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Continue to Ponte Palatino and cross it to enter historical Rome. The districts on both sides of the Palatino Bridge (Trastevere - outside the walls and Aventino and Forum Boarium into the walls are covered in our trip "From Forum Boarium, via Trastevere and Gianicolo Hill".

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