Paris - from Place du Châtelet to Place de Bourse

MAY 21,2017 - MAY 21,2017 (1 DAYS)

France

1 DAYS

Citywalk

From Place du Châtelet to Place de Bourse:

Tip/Part 1 Main Attractions: Place du Châtelet, Pont Neuf, Square du Vert Galant, Monnaie de Paris, Place Dauphine, Pont des Arts, The Louvre Museum, Carrousel Arc de Triomphe, Carrousel Gardens, The Tuileries Gardens, Place de la Concorde.

Tip/Part 2 Main Attractions: Place de la Concorde, Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume, Rue Saint Honore, Place du Marché Saint-Honoré, Place Vendôme, Eglise Saint-Roche, Place Colette, La Comédie-Française, Jardin du Palais Royal, Galerie Vivienne, Place des Victoires, Basilica of Notre-Dame des Victoires, Place de la Bourse. 

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Duration: 1 day, Start: Châtelet Metro station, End: Bourse Metro Station, Weather: Sunny or cloudy - but NOT rainy or windy. Distance: 12 km. Important Note: We do NOT enter the Louvre Museum in this itinerary.

Our Itinerary: Place du Châtelet is one of the busiest and most bustling spots of Paris. Don't come here if you want peace!  The Palmiers fountain is the epic entre of the square. It was built in 1806 to celebrate Napoleon Bonaparte victorie. It is the largest fountain built during Napoleon's reign still in existence. It was designed by the engineer François-Jean Bralle, who was in charge of the Paris fountains and water supply during the First Empire. It was finished in 1808. It stands between the Théâtre du Châtelet and the Théâtre de la Ville:

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Two theatres in a Italian Renaissance style, adorn the Châtelet square. Designed by Davioud in 1862. The Châtelet theatre has more than 2,000 seats and shows lyrical and musical art: 

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Its almost-twin, the Theatre de la Ville, has long beared the name of comedian Sarah Bernhardt, who has embodied big characters for more than 20 years. The programme is entirely dedicated to contemporary dance:

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Head southwest on Place du Châtelet toward Quai de la Mégisserie, 30 m. Turn right (west) onto Quai de la Mégisserie, 350 m. and turn left onto Pont Neuf (New Bridge). The Pont Neuf is the oldest standing (stone) bridge across the river Seine in Paris, France. Henri IV ordered it to be constructed in 1578. The construction ended in 1607 during the reign of Henri IV. The delay was due to the rebellion of the people of Paris against the king (1588-1598). In 1599, king Henry IV resumed the work and commissioned its completion to Guillaume Marchant and François Petit who modified the initial plan. It borders the most western point of the Île de la Cité island. Twelve arches, 384 ‘mascarons’ or grotesque faces decorating the cornices and the equestrian statue of Henri IV, the first to be placed on a public thoroughfare. Consisting of two spans, the bridge connects the Musée du Louvre, Rue de Rivoli and the Tour Saint-Jacques on the Right Bank with the Rue Dauphine, the Monnaie de Paris and Saint-Germain-des-Prés on the Left Bank via the Ile de la Cité. The views from this bridge in a sunny day - are wonderful. Perfect place to watch also the sunset over the river Seine, with ships going up and down and the onset of the lighting of the buildings, including the Tour Eiffel and the Louvre. Walk down to the Seine and get a different view from the water to the upper bridge. Another alternative: go down the stairs to the tip of the Ile de la Cité island. There, you see a small park (Square of the Vert Galant) (Square du Vert-Galant) that is perfect for a picnic and is a peaceful spot surrounded by the noise and activity of the city around:

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Pont Neuf - the bronze statue of Henry IV:

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If you look towards the north side of Pont Neuf - you see the giant picture (wall picture) of La Samaritaine department store:

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Walk south, 80 m., along Pont Neuf with your back to the Samaritaine complex. Turn left onto Quai de l'Horloge, 140 m. Sharp left, 190 m and you arrive to the small pier of Vedettes du Pont Neuf in Square du Vert Galant. A small, secluded paradise. This small island is the perfect spot to sit and just enjoy being in Paris if the weather is permitting. During the summer there are some cool, shaded areas at the top of the square underneath the willow trees. The left side looking toward the tip provides stunning views along the Seine during the sunset times. This triangular square is a gem:

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Along the bridge of Pont Neauf and from its southern edge - you get a nice view to the west and to the Pont des Arts (the Arts Bridge):

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If you arrived to the most southern end of Pont Neuf and turned right (west) - you see the Quai de Conti and Hotel de la Monnai or Monnaie de Paris. The Monnaie de Paris (Paris Mint) is a government-owned institution responsible for producing France's euro coins. Founded in 864 AD, it is the world's oldest continuously-running minting institution. Many ancient coins are housed in the collections maintained here. Though in the Middle Ages there were numerous other mints in provincial cities officially issuing legitimate French coinage struck in the name of the ruler, the Monnaie de Paris has always been the prime issuer:

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Now, we return to the Pont Neuf - heading back to Ile de la Cité. From Monnaie de Paris, 11 Quai de Conti - head southeast on Quai de Conti toward Rue Guénégaud, 120 m. Turn left onto Pont Neuf, 80 m. Slight right to stay on Pont Neuf, 30 m. Continue onto Place du Pont Neuf, 20 m. Turn RIGHT (east) onto Rue Henri Robert, 35 m. Slight right onto Place Dauphine, 70 m. Place Dauphine was laid out in 1607–10, when the Place Royale was still under construction. It was among the earliest city-planning projects of Henri IV, and was on a site created from part of the western garden of the walled enclave known as the Palais de la Cité. Since its construction, almost all of the houses surrounding the square have been raised in height, given new facades, rebuilt, or replaced with imitations of the originals. Only two retain their original appearance, those flanking the entrance facing the Pont Neuf. Tucked away on the western tip of the Île de la Cité, Place Dauphine combines all the beauty and romance of Paris into one beautifully historic square. This leafy is lined with quintessentially Parisian buildings, art galleries and cafés, not to mention lovely little cobblestone streets. Rich with history and overflowing with ambiance, Place Dauphine is a popular destination for couples and tranquility seekers:

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You can see the Palais de justice, Cour de Cassation, Supreme Court, 36, Quai des Orfèvres. From Place Dauphine head southeast toward Rue de Harlay, 45 m. Turn left at Rue de Harlay, 130 m and turn right onto Quai de l'Horloge. 40 m. further you see this 18th century building:

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Our next destination is the Pont des Arts. We could arrive to this bridge along the southern side of the Seine or return to the northern bank and walk west along this bank. We shall stick with the 2nd option (because we want to pass through the Louvre Museum as well). From the Supreme Court, 5 Quai de l'Horloge we head west on Quai de l'Horloge toward Rue de Harlay, 220 m. Turn right and walk over the Pont Neuf from south to north, 180 m. Turn left onto Quai du Louvre, 200 m.

books stalls between Pont Neuf and Pont des Arts:

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Continue onto Quai François Mitterrand, 140 m

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and turn left onto Pont des Arts taking the  pedestrian overpass. Before you turn to the Pont des Artys - on your right, Palais du Louvre:

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The Pont des Arts links the Institut de France and the central square (cour carrée) of the Palais du Louvre. Pont des Arts is the first  metal bridge in Paris. Between 1802 and 1804, under the reign of Napoleon I, a nine-arch metallic bridge for pedestrians was constructed at the location of the present day Pont des Arts. The present bridge was built between 1981 and 1984. On 27 June 1984, the newly reconstructed bridge was inaugurated by Jacques Chirac, then the mayor of Paris (later, president of France). Since late 2008, tourists have taken to attaching padlocks (love locks) with their first names written or engraved on them to the railing or the grate on the side of the bridge, then throwing the key into the Seine river below, as a romantic gesture. This gesture is said to represent a couple's committed love. By 2014, concern was being expressed about the possible damage the weight of the locks were doing to the structure of the bridge. In August 2014, the Paris Mayor's Office began to say publicly that they wanted to encourage tourists to take "selfies" instead of leaving love locks, when they launched the "Love Without Locks" campaign and social media hashtag. On 18 September 2014, the City authorities replaced three panels of this bridge with a special glass as an experiment as they search for alternative materials for the bridge where locks cannot be attached. From 1 June 2015, city council workmen from Paris started to cut down all the locks after years of complaints from locals. Over a million locks were placed, weighing approximately 45 tons. Street artists have been chosen to paint the new panels that replaces the old railings with locks. The bridge has been featured in numerous films and television shows.

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In the southern end of Pont des Arts - is the Institut de France:

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We return northward and cross, again, the Pont des Arts from south to north and continue west to the Palais du Louvre. The Louvre Museum (Musée du Louvre) is  one of the finest art galleries and most famous museums in the world. it’s also the most visited art gallery in the world! Home to hundreds of thousands of classic and modern masterpieces. Tours depart every 30 minutes between April-September, and every hour October- March and tours last for 60 minutes. The Louvre was originally built as a fortress in 1190, on the right-bank site of the 12th-century fortress of Philip Augustus. Later reconstructed to be a royal palace in the 16th century before the monarchy moved out to Château de Versailles. In 1546 Francis I, who was a great art collector, had this old castle razed and began to build on its site another royal residence, the Louvre, which was added to by almost every subsequent French monarch. Under Francis I, only a small portion of the present Louvre was completed, under the architect Pierre Lescot. This original section is today the southwestern part of the Cour Carrée. In the 17th century, major additions were made to the building complex by Louis XIII and Louis XIV. Cardinal de Richelieu, the chief minister of Louis XIII, acquired great works of art for the king. Louis XIV and his minister, Cardinal Mazarin, acquired outstanding art collections, including that of Charles I of England. A committee consisting of the architects Claude Perrault and Louis Le Vau and the decorator and painter Charles Le Brun planned that part of the Louvre which is known as the Colonnade. The Louvre ceased to be a royal residence when Louis XIV moved his court to Versailles in 1682. The idea of using the Louvre as a public museum originated in the 18th century. The comte d’Angiviller helped build and plan the Grande Galerie and continued to acquire major works of art. The first ‘Louvre Museum’ opened in 1793, during the French Revolution, with a collection of only 537 paintings. Under Napoleon the Cour Carrée and a wing on the north along the rue de Rivoli were begun. Napoléon decided to rename the Louvre Musée Napoléon under his reign and increased the collection (although after his defeat, many pieces were returned to their owners!). In the 19th century two major wings, their galleries and pavilions extending west, were completed, and Napoleon III was responsible for the exhibition that opened them. The completed Louvre was a vast complex of buildings forming two main quadrilaterals and enclosing two large courtyards. The Louvre building complex underwent a major remodeling in the 1980s and ’90s in order to make the old museum more accessible and accommodating to its visitors. A vast underground complex of offices, shops, exhibition spaces, storage areas, and parking areas, as well as an auditorium, a tourist bus depot, and a cafeteria, was constructed underneath the Louvre’s central courtyards of the Cour Napoléon and the Cour du Carrousel. The ground-level entrance to this complex was situated in the centre of the Cour Napoléon and was crowned by a controversial steel-and-glass pyramid designed by the American architect I.M. Pei. The underground complex of support facilities and public amenities was opened in 1989. In 1993, on the museum’s 200th anniversary, the rebuilt Richelieu wing, formerly occupied by France’s Ministry of Finance, was opened; for the first time, the entire Louvre was devoted to museum purposes. The Louvre’s painting collection is one of the richest in the world, representing all periods of European art up to the Revolutions of 1848. (Works painted after that date that the Louvre once housed were transferred to the Musée d’Orsay upon its opening in 1986.) The Louvre’s collection of French paintings from the 15th to the 19th century is unsurpassed in the world, and it also has many masterpieces by Italian Renaissance painters, including Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa (c. 1503–19), and works by Flemish and Dutch painters of the Baroque period. Since being stolen in 1911, the famous – and enigmatic – Mona Lisa portrait is framed and covered with bullet proof glass and protected by guards at all times (don’t worry, it was returned in 1913). Musée du Louvre opening hours: Monday: 9.00 – 18.00, Tuesday: Closed. Wednesday: 9.00 –21.45, Thursday: 9.00 – 18.00, Friday: 9.00 - 21.45, Saturday: 9.00 - 18.00, 
Sunday: 9.00 – 18.00. On the first Saturday of each month, the museum is also open from 6 p.m. to 9:45 p.m. and admission is free for all visitors. Rooms begin closing at 17.30, and at 21.30 on night openings. On Mondays, December 24 and 31, 2018, the museum will be closing at 17.00. The first rooms will begin closing around 30 minutes before, depending on the number of visitors in the museum:

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As you continue walking west and leave the Louvre Museum main courtyard - you arrive to the Carrousel Arc de Triomphe. The Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel is a triumphal arch located in the Place du Carrousel. It is an example of Corinthian style architecture. It was built between 1806 and 1808 to commemorate Napoleon's military victories of the previous year. The Arc de Triomphe de l'Étoile, at the far end of the Champs Élysées, was designed in the same year; it is about twice the size and was not completed until 1836. Around its exterior are eight Corinthian columns of marble, topped by eight soldiers of the Empire. The arch is derivative of the triumphal arches of the Roman Empire, in particular that of Septimius Severus in Rome. The quadriga atop the entablement is a copy of the so-called Horses of Saint Mark that adorn the top of the main door of the St Mark's Basilica in Venice. The Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel celebrates French victory at the Battle of Austerlitz in 1805, which saw the troops of Napoleon Bonaparte fighting the Russian and Austrian Empires. The sculpture at the top represents a work seized as a war chest by Napoleon’s troops in Venice. It shows Saint Mark accompanied by a team of four horses. The original was returned in 1815 after the defeat at the Battle of Waterloo. The two sculptures surrounding the Arc de Triomphe are L’histoire and La France Victorieuse by Antoine-François Gérard:

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Now, you enter the Carrousel GardensCitywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

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The Tuileries Gardens take their name from the tile factories which previously stood on the site where Queen Catherine de Medici built the Palais des Tuileries in 1564. André Le Nôtre, the famous gardener of King Louis XIV, re-landscaped the gardens in 1664 to give them their current French formal garden style. The gardens, which separate the Louvre from the Place de la Concorde, are a pleasant place for walking and for culture for Parisians and tourists; Maillol statues stand alongside those of Rodin or Giacometti. The gardens’ two ponds are perfect places to relax by. Lovers of candyfloss and fairground rides will enjoy the Fête des Tuileries, from June to August. in the Tuileries, visitors may admire over 200 exceptional statues and vases, dating from the 17th to the 21st century. Opening hours of the Tuileries Gardens: 7.30  - 19.30 pm, from the last Sunday in September to the last Sunday in March, 7 .00 - 21.00, from the last Sunday in March to the last Saturday in September:Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Alexander the Great:

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Casandre:

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Theseus:

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Julius Caesar:

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Standing Woman - Gaston Lachaise:

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Hannibal:

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Le Tiber:

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La Seine & Le Marne:

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Andre le Notre the historic and royal gardener of the Carrousel and Tuileries Gardens:

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The Musée de l’Orangerie, where visitors can admire the works of Monet, is in the south-west part of the Tuileries. From March to December, free tours in French are organized.

We continue walking westward and arrive to Place de la Concorde. Skip to Tip 2 below.

Citywalk

Part 2: from Place de la Concorde to the Place de Bourse.

Tip 2 Main Attractions: Place de la Concorde, Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume, Rue Saint Honore, Place du Marché Saint-Honoré, Place Vendôme, Eglise Saint-Roche, Place Colette, La Comédie-Française, Jardin du Palais Royal, Galerie Vivienne, Place des Victoires, Basilica of Notre-Dame des Victoires, Place de la Bourse.

We arrived to Place de la Concorde with our back to the east (Tuileries Gardens) and our face to the Concorde Square. For more details on this square - see Tipter blog "Paris - Élysée". The squareit is famous for the Luxor Obelisk (a 3,300 year old Egyptian obelisk erected on the square in October 1836), the surrounding prestigious hotels, and the two monumental fountains (Fontaine des Mers and Fontaine des Fleuves). Created in 1772, Place de la Concorde was originally known for having been an execution site during the French Revolution. Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette (among others) were guillotined here. Between 1836 and 1846 the architect Jacques-Ignace Hittorf redesigned the square to become what it is today:

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In the southern end of Place de la Concorde - resides Jeu de Paume Museum, 1 Place de la Concorde. The Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume is an arts centre for modern and postmodern photography and media. It borders the north corner (west side) of the Tuileries Gardens next to the Place de la Concorde in Paris. In 2004, Galerie Nationale du Jeu de Paume, Centre National de la Photographie and Patrimoine Photographique merged to form the Association de Préfiguration for the Jeu de Paume. The rectangular building was constructed in 1861 during the reign of Napoleon III. It originally housed real tennis courts; the name of this game in French is jeu de paume. Jeu de Paume was used from 1940 to 1944 to store art masterpieces looted by the Nazi regime. These works included masterpieces from the collections of French Jewish families like the Rothschilds, the David-Weills, the Bernheims,and noted dealers including Paul Rosenberg who specialized in impressionist and post-impressionist works. The gallery is dedicated to photography, video, art house films and new technologies. The collections are only displayed in temporary exhibitions, which take place throughout the year. Opening hours: Everyday 11.00 - 19.00 (Thursdays - 11.00 - 21.00), Mondays - closed. Prices: Entrance: €10. Concessions: €7.50.

Jeu de Paume - view to Place de la Concorde Obeisk and Tour Eiffel:

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From Jeu de Paume - Head northeast on Place de la Concorde, 120 m. Turn right to stay on Place de la Concorde, 45 m. Continue onto Rue Royale, 210 m. Turn right onto Rue Saint Honoré, 450 m. You should also try Rue Saint Honore ! Just under two kilometres long, from the Place de la Concorde to the Arc de Triomphe, is a grand avenue with the great luxury houses of France all represented. Think Louis Vuitton, Hugo Boss down to Gap (largest store in Europe) Zara, Disney and Benetton. There is even the flagship Peugeot store, with concept cars and the brand’s famous salt and pepper grinders. The street is, actually, divided into two parts: the initial part called Rue Saint Honore and the second part, Rue du Faubourg Saint Honore - which essentially means Saint Honore Street outside the walls of the city. Today it’s just one street but Faubourg is where the massive fashion houses are - Versace, Hermes, Yves Saint Lauren, Prada, Valentino -and the Rue Saint Honore is where the smaller boutiques are. Turn right onto Rue de Castiglione, 170 m. Use the right lane to turn right onto Rue de Rivoli, 110 m. It was Sunday. Most of the restaurants are closed. We turned right, 66 m.  onto Rue Rouget de Lisle. Note the house in #7:

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Head northeast on Rue Rouget de Lisle toward Rue du Mont Thabor, 20 m. Turn right onto Rue du Mont Thabor. Walk 210 m. along Mont Tabor to see the building (Hotel Maurice) at #9:

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From 9 Rue du Mont Thabor - head southeast on Rue du Mont Thabor toward Rue d'Alger, 60 m. Turn left onto Rue d'Alger, 65 m. Turn right onto Rue Saint Honoré, 60 m. and turn left onto Rue du Marché Saint-Honoré, 130 m. Turn right onto Place du Marché Saint-Honoré, 20 m. and we dined at Le Pain Quotidien, 18 Place du Marché Saint-Honoré. It was, as we said, a sunny Sunday and all the restaurants around (well, there were plenty of them open along the weekend - just in this square) were full up. It was expensive. 24.20 euros for two posh, gluten-free sandwiches of chicken and avocado. Place du Marché Saint-Honoré is a wonderful square.  Good place to wander about and go for lunch. Lots of restaurants and all kinds of things to eat. Seems to be all locals having their lunch break. About 14.00 the cafes start to empty out. Twice a week (Wednesday, 12.30 - 20.30; Saturday, 7.00 - 15.00) a food market spreads out all around the glass building on the Place du Marché Saint-Honoré, designed by Ricardo Bofill. It has been taking place since 2003, offering fruit and vegetables, bakeries, fresh ready-to-eat dishes (très délicieux!), jewellery, stoles and clothes.

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From the restaurant Le Pain Quotidien, 18 Place du Marché Saint-Honoré,  we head east on Place du Marché Saint-Honoré toward Rue Gomboust, 110 m. Turn left to stay on Place du Marché Saint-Honoré, 25 m. Turn right onto Rue du Marché Saint-Honoré, 45 m. Turn left onto Rue Danielle Casanova, 160 m. Turn left onto Place Vendôme, 110 m. The Place Vendôme is one of the city’s most famous and beautiful neoclassical squares. Completely surrounded by sober buildings, it currently houses some of the most famous high-end stores, such as, Dior, Chanel or Cartier. The square was previously called Place Louis le Grand, Place des Conquêtes, Place des Piques or Place International, and is nowadays an example of the opulence and luxury found in Paris. The most exclusive jewellery stores, high-end shops and best hotels, including the Ritz and the Vendôme hotels, are found in this impressive square. Although this neighborhood is quite pricey, we definitely recommend visiting the area even if you don’t intend on shopping. Place Vendôme and the adjoining Rue de la Paix are one continuous stream of window displays filled with sparkling diamonds, rubies and emeralds. When the square was designed, the façades of all the buildings were built before the actual constructions so that the square would be perfect. Place Vendôme was built on the orders of Louis XIV, as a grandiose setting that would embody absolute power in the very heart of Paris.  During the Revolution, the square was renamed Place des Piques. Napoleon replaced the statue of the king, dismantled in 1792, with a bronze column made from 1,200 enemy canons (where the statue of Louis XIV had previously stood). It has a low relief imitating the Trajan’s Column in Rome. During the Second Empire, however, the octagonal square – a marvel of classical urban design – gradually became a showcase for luxury goods rather than political power:

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Hotel Ritz in Place Vendôme:

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Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

From Place Vendôme - Head northeast toward Rue Danielle Casanova, 110 m. Turn right onto Rue Danielle Casanova, 260 m. Turn right onto Avenue de l'Opéra, 30m. Turn right onto Rue Gomboust, 20 m. Turn left onto Rue Saint-Roch, 230 m to arrive to Eglise Saint-Roche in the intersection of Rue Saint-Honore x Rue Saint-Roch. The church is organized as a series of chapels. One of them is dedicated to Saint Susanna in memory of the church which used to stand in its place. Accordingly, there is a mural painting above the altar, showing Saint Susanna fleeing her attackers, and looking up to the heavens for the help of God. At the time of the French Revolution, the church of Saint-Roch was often at the centre of events and was the scene of many shootings which have left their mark on the façade. A battle between the French Revolutionary troops and Royalist forces in the streets of Paris, in 5 DEC 1795, was one such occasion, and was pivotal in the rise of Napoleon:

 Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

We continue walking along Rue Saint-Honore eastward. From Eglise Saint Roch, 296 Rue Saint Honoré we head southwest on Rue Saint-Roch toward Rue Saint Honoré, 50 m. Turn left onto Rue Saint Honoré, 280 m. Turn left toward Rue de Richelieu, 60 m. Turn left onto Rue de Richelieu 15 m. further and you face La Comédie Française and Place Colette on your right. The Colette square is a very beautiful square with a glass-like, marble pergola (Jean-Michel Othniel 's work "The Night Spot"):

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

The Comédie-Française is most classic French theatre. This is a beautiful historic theater where one can see a perfect performance of a classic French comedy or drama. The theatre was constructed in 1680 by a group of actors heded by the playwriter Molière. Inside, you can see statues of great dramatic actors, like Voltaire and Molière, Victor Hugo, Dumas and many others. There is also the armchair, in which Molière had his collapse, by playing "the sick imaginary". Nice gift shop. Fascinating area full with history. You can read all the plaques celebrating authors, actors and playwrights all around the outside of the building. We were not allowed to enter and see the interiors. We were told that they are fantastic.

From the Comédie Française, 1 Place Colette - Head east on Rue Saint Honoré toward Galerie de Nemours, 130 m:Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Turn left onto Rue de Valois. Turn right toward Galerie de Valois, 20 m. Turn right onto Galerie de Valois, 10 m. Turn left toward Passage du Perron, 30 m. Turn right onto Passage du Perron, 95 m. Turn left, 15 m to enter the Jardin du Palais Royal. A wonderful place to relax during a sunny afternoon: boxed hedges,FOUR beautiful arcades that frame the garden: the Galerie de Valois (east), Galerie de Montpensier (west) and Galerie Beaujolais (north) and the Garden Gallery to the south. But, the greatest marvel here is at the southern end of the complex: a sculptor of Daniel Buren. 260 black-and-white striped columns, that have become the garden's signature feature. The Palais-Royal garden is served by metro lines:  1, 7 at the Palais Royal - Louvre station and by the bus lines: 21 27 29 39 48 67 81 95. Open: everyday. FREE:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

From Jardin du Palais Royal we return southeast toward Passage du Perron, 15 m. Turn left onto Passage du Perron, 130 m. Continue onto Rue Vivienne, 25 m. Turn right onto Rue des Petits Champs, 60 m. Turn left onto Galerie Vivienne, 5 Rue de la Banque 55 m. Turn right to stay on Galerie Vivienne, 30 m. You can access Galerie Vivienne from two directions: via Rue de la Banque or Rue Vivienne. Galerie Vivienne was built in 1823, as one of the most iconic covered arcades in Paris. In a peaceful location, behind the Bibliothèque Richelieu and near the Palais-Royal, it's definitely worth a visit. Visitors can admire the colourful mosaics on the ground and then lift their eyes to appreciate the beautiful glass roof which lets in the light. There are many of shops: ready-to-wear boutiques, tea rooms, gourmet food boutiques, wine cellars, grocery shops, old bookshops and much more: 

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Galerie Vivienne - Bistro Vivienne:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

From Galerie Vivienne, 5 Rue de la Banque continue eastward onto Passage des Petits Pères, 30 m. Turn right toward Rue des Petits Pères, 25 m. Turn left onto Rue des Petits Pères, 50 m. Turn right onto Rue Vide Gousset, 50 m. You've arrived to Place des Victoires. The Place des Victoires is a very impressive square, an elegant square with symmetrical architectur. It, is one of the oldest royal squares in Paris. At its center stands an equestrian statue of King Louis XIV, the Sun King. The Place des Victoires was laid out by the order of François d'Aubusson de La Feuillade, a French Marshal who wanted to stand in the good graces of King Louis XIV.
The sole purpose of the square was to provide a perfect backdrop for a new statue of the king Louis XIV. In 1685, Jules Hardouin Mansart, the court architect who also worked on the Versailles Palace, designed the harmonious curved facades of the houses that surround the square. The proportions of the houses were carefully designed in relation to the statue of the reigning King. The statue of Louis XIV was installed at the center of the square in 1686. It was created to commemorate the Treaties of Peace of Nijmegen (1678-1679), which ended the war between France and several other European nations. The 12-meter-high monument showed the king triumphantly standing on a pedestal. At the king's foot rested captives, allegorical representations of the countries that were defeated by France: Spain, the Holy Roman Empire, the Brandenburg Treaty and the Dutch Republic. The bronze statues, created by Martin Desjardins, were gilded. In 1792 the revolutionaries tore the king's statue down and melted it to make cannons. In 1822 King Louis XVIII commissioned François Joseph Bosio with the creation of a new statue of King Louis XIV to replace the original. Bosio created a bronze statue which bears no resemblance to the statue that first graced the square. It shows the king astride his rearing horse. The pedestal is decorated with two large bronze reliefs that show a battlefield scene (the crossing of the Rhine river in 1672) on one side and King Louis XIV who initiates the creation of the Military order of Saint Louis in 1693 on the other side. The statues of the prisoners (captives) survived the French Revolution - even though they lost the gilding - and are now on display at the Cour Puget in the Louvre Museum:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

From Place des Victoires - head northeast on Rue Vide Gousset toward Rue du Mail, 50 m. Turn left onto Rue des Petits Pères, 20 m. Turn right onto Rue Notre Dame des Victoires, 10 m. Turn left onto Place des Petits Pères for 20 m. and you see the Basilica of Notre-Dame des Victoires, Place des Petits Pères - on your right. In 1619 the Discalced Augustinians (colloquially referred to as the "Petits Pères") established their convent, Notre-Dame-des-Victoires, on three hectares of land they had purchased by the bourse (market) of the city, located at the intersection of the Place des Petits-Pères and Rue de la Banque. Notre Dame des Victoires is the former chapel of the Augustinian fathers (Petits-Pères), built in the years 1629-1740:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Place des Petits-Pères:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

From Place des Petits Pères - head west on Passage des Petits Pères toward Rue de la Banque, 30 m. Turn right onto Rue de la Banque, 250 m and we have arrived to our last destination - Place de la Bourse. Marché Bourse in Place de la Bourse, opposite the Palais Brongniart, is one of the only Parisian markets to be open in the afternoon. Handy for locals as well as workers at the many offices in the area. Opening times: Tuesday and Friday, 12.30  - 20.30.

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip The Bourse Metro station is in this square (on the west side of the square).

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