Paris - from Palais-Royal Gardens to Forum des Halles Gardens

JUL 21,2019 - JUL 21,2019 (1 DAYS)

France

1 DAYS

Citywalk

Paris - from Palais-Royal Gardens to the Forum des Halles Gardens

Start: Palais Royal Musée du Louvre Metro station (lines 1 and 7). End: Les Halles Metro Station (Line 4) or Pont Neuf Metro station (Line 7). Duration: 1 day. Distance: 13 km.

Main Sights: Place Colette and Galerie du Théatre Français, Jardin du Palais Royal, Place André Malraux, Place du Marché Saint-Honoré, Place Vendôme, L'église de la Madeleine, Magasin Printemps department store, Opéra Garnier, Musée du Parfum, the Le Centorial building, Rue du 4 Septembre, the Bourse, Rue Réaumur, Église Saint-Eustache, Forum des Halles gardens. 

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Our daily itinerary: From the Metro station of Palais Royal / Musée du Louvre head east on Rue Saint-Honoré toward Galerie de Nemours, 20 m. Turn left onto Galerie de Nemours, 30 m. Turn left onto Place Colette and Galerie du Théatre Français. A lovely ambiance of this big square in front of the Comedie Francaise and near the Palais Royal - although it is quite busy with vehicles and pedestrians. The principal theater of the Comédie-Française, the Salle Richelieu, stands in the intersection of the Rue de Richelieu with the Avenue de l'Opéra - in Place Colette. The Comédie-Française is the most famous theater in France. Founded in 1680, it is the oldest active theater company in the world. Established as a French state-controlled entity in 1995, it is the only state theatre in France to have its own permanent troupe of actors. The theater has also been known as the Théâtre de la République and popularly as "La Maison de Molière" (The House of Molière). It acquired the latter name from the troupe of the best-known playwright associated with the Comédie-Française, Jean-Baptiste Poquelin (15 January 1622 - 17 February 1673), known by his stage name Molière. He was considered the patron of French actors. He died seven years before his troupe became known as the Comédie-Française, but the company continued to be known as "La Maison de Molière" even after the official change of name. The company's primary venue is the Salle Richelieu, which is a part of the Palais-Royal complex and located at 2 rue de Richelieu on the Place André-Malraux. The Comédie-Française today has a repertoire of 3,000 works and three theatres in Paris (Salle Richelieu, next to the Palais Royal; théâtre du Vieux-Colombier; Studio-Théâtre). The Salle Richlieu, a theatre built by architect Victor Louis on rue de Richelieu and opened in 1790, has an Italianate auditorium with some 860 seats. Several alternating productions are programmed here each week. Annual closure from the end of July to the start of September. Guided visits available at weekends. The shop of the Théâtre de la Comédie-Française offers a collection of objects and books on the theater and its heritage: tableware, stationery, jewellery and textiles. Opening hours: Tuesday to Saturday: 11.00 - 20.30, Sunday: 13.00 - 20.30 19.30 on weekends). Closed on Mondays:

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Voltaire statue at the entrance hall of the Comédie Française:

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A tribute to Victor Hugo:

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From the Galerie du Théatre Français in Place Colette - we head east toward Galerie de Nemours, 25 m. Turn left onto Galerie de Chartres, 100 m. Turn left onto Galerie du Jardin to enter the Galerie de Montpensier leading to Jardin du Palais Royal. Note: you can enter the Palais Royal Gardens from the north-east corner of Place Colette - near near Cafe' Memours. Note: The main entrance front of the Palais-Royal is on the Rue Saint-Honoré:

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Here, you face this sculpture:

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The entrance court faces the Place du Palais-Royal, opposite the Louvre:

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Bordered by the Palais-Royal and the adjacent arcaded galleries, the garden is a peaceful haven in the French capital, not far from the busy thoroughfares of avenue de l’Opéra and rue de Rivoli. The Palais-Royal now serves as the seat of the Ministry of Culture, the Conseil d'État and the Constitutional Council. Originally called the Palais-Cardinal, the palace was the personal residence of Cardinal Richelieu. The architect Jacques Lemercier began his design in 1629. Construction commenced in 1633 and was completed in 1639. Upon Richelieu's death in 1642 the palace became the property of the King and acquired the new name Palais-Royal. After Louis XIII died the following year, it became the home of the Queen Mother Anne of Austria and her young sons Louis XIV and Philippe, duc d'Anjou, along with her advisor Cardinal Mazarin. From 1649, the palace was the residence of the exiled Henrietta Maria and Henrietta Anne Stuart, wife and daughter of the deposed King Charles I of England. The two had escaped England in the midst of the English Civil War and were sheltered by Henrietta Maria's nephew, King Louis XIV. Henrietta Anne was later married to Louis' younger brother, Philippe de France, duc d'Orléans in the palace chapel on 31 March 1661. The following year the new duchesse d'Orléans gave birth to a daughter, Marie Louise d'Orléans, inside the palace. After their marriage, the palace became the main residence of the House of Orléans. With a surface of 20,850 m2, the garden was created in 1633 by Pierre Desgots for Richelieu and redesigned by André Le Nôtre in 1674. Duchess Henrietta envisioned to make it one of Paris’ most beautiful ornemental gardens. After Henrietta Anne died in 1670 the Duke took a second wife, the Princess Palatine, who preferred to live in the Château de Saint-Cloud. Over a decade or so, sections of the Palais were transformed into shopping arcades that became the centre of 18th-century Parisian social, economic and social life. For Parisians, who lived in the virtual absence of pavements, the streets were dangerous and dirty; the arcade was a welcome addition to the street-scape as it afforded a safe place where Parisians could window shop and socialize. Designed to attract the genteel middle class, the Palais-Royal sold luxury goods at relatively high prices. However, prices were never a deterrent, as these new arcades came to be the place to shop and to be seen. Arcades offered shoppers the promise of an enclosed space away from the chaos that characterized the noisy, dirty streets; a warm, dry space away from the elements; and a safe-haven where people could socialise and spend their leisure time. Promenading in the arcades became a popular eighteenth century pastime for the emerging middle classes. At the death of Louis XIV in 1715, his five-year-old great-grandson succeeded him. The Duke of Orléans became Regent for the young Louis XV, setting up the country's government at the Palais-Royal, while the young king lived at the nearby Tuileries Palace. The Palais-Royal housed the magnificent Orléans art collection of some 500 paintings, which was arranged for public viewing until it was sold abroad in 1791. At the death of Louis XIV in 1715, after the Regency, the social life of the palace became much more subdued. Louis XV moved the court back to Versailles and Paris was again ignored. The same happened with the Palais-Royal. After the Restoration of the Bourbons, at the Palais-Royal the young Alexandre Dumas obtained employment in the office of the powerful duc d'Orléans, who regained control of the Palace during the Restoration. In the Revolution of 1848, the Paris mob trashed and looted the Palais-Royal. Under the Second Empire the Palais-Royal was home to the cadet branch of the Bonaparte family, represented by Prince Napoleon, Napoleon III's cousin.

The garden contains some 500 trees, including four double rows of lime trees planted in the 1970s and red horse chesnuts planted in 1910. The long garden is bordered by four arcaded galleries: the Montpensier Gallery (west), the Beaujolais Gallery (north), the Valois Gallery (east) and the Orleans Gallery (south). 

The central part of the garden is occupied by a basin with a water jet. A beautiful garden with lovely fountains, surrounded by historically-important colonades with shops. The central garden has two long lawns bordered with flowerbeds designed by American gardener Mark Rudkin. Some shades to sit in during the hottest time of the day. Well worth a walk through or a sit down by one of the fountains. Carefully manicured hedges separate alleys and in between, planters and flowerbeds offer solace to the tired visitor. There are benches distributed throughout the gardens, so you can bring your sandwich and beverage. Besides the beautiful gardens there are places for coffee and a very fancy restaurant, both giving garden views.

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Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

The large inner courtyard (cour d’honneur) of the palace is separated from the garden by a double row of columns, the Orleans Gallery. In 1986 it welcomed a monumental (and controversial) work of art designed by Daniel Buren. Known as ‘les colonnes de Buren’, it comprises of 260 black and white striped octogonal columns of unequal height. In 1830 the larger inner courtyard of the palace, the Cour d'Honneur, was enclosed to the north by what was probably the most famous of Paris's covered arcades, the Galerie d'Orléans. Demolished in the 1930s, its flanking rows of columns still stand between the Cour d'Honneur and the popular Palais-Royal Gardens. There are black and white pillars scattered in the courtyard which are very photogenic.

Cour d'Honneur - Les Colonnes de Buren:

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Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

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Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

The garden of the Palais-Royal is the only garden in Paris classified as “Remarkable Garden” by the French Ministry of Culture.

We exit the Palais-Royal gardens from its south-est corner. From Passage de Montpensier we turn left onto Rue de Montpensier, 45 m. Turn right to stay on Rue de Montpensier, 30 m. Continue onto Place André Malraux. Place André-Malraux is situated to the north-east by Place Colette. Its north and east sides are built with buildings typical of the Second Empire, mainly for offices today. To the west, the square is bordered by Rue de Richelieu, on which stands the Comédie-Française. To the south, the buildings are heterogeneous, built without a unified urban program after the destruction of the former hospital of Quinze-Vingts, in the second half 18th century. In the intersection with  the Avenue de l'Opera, the Hotel du Louvre dominates the square. The two fountains of 1874 are the works of Mathurin Moreau . They are placed symmetrically in relation to the Avenue de l'Opera which crosses the square in its diagonal.

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From Place André Malraux we head west on Place André Malraux toward Avenue de l'Opéra, 10 m. Turn right onto Avenue de l'Opéra and walk 400 m to the north-west. Turn left onto Rue Gomboust, 100 m. Turn left onto Place du Marché Saint-Honoré. Here, you can find (Wednesday, 12.30 - 20.3, Saturday, 7.00 - 15.00) food market that spreads out all around the glass building on the Place du Marché Saint-Honoré, designed by Ricardo Bofill. It has been taking place since 2003, offering fruit and vegetables, bakeries, fresh ready-to-eat dishes, jewellery, stoles and clothes. Lovely part of Paris with lots of coffees and some very cool vibes and design shops in this same area. Part of them are closed during the weekends. The Pain Quotidien has interesting offerings, but, the dishes are small and not cheap. Charly Bun’s looks better if you can find a seat. Great breakfast spot. The whole square is full up. Try to make a reservation in advance. About 14.30 the cafes start to empty out. 

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Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

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Head north on Place du Marché Saint-Honoré toward Rue Gomboust, 55 m. Stay on Place du Marché Saint-Honoré, 40 m. Turn right onto Rue du Marché Saint-Honoré, 45 m. Turn left onto Rue Danielle Casanova, 160 m. Turn left onto Place Vendôme. Probably, the most prestigious square in Paris. Place Vendôme (Vendome Square) was laid out in 1702. Architect Jules Hardouin-Mansart, who built most of the Versailles Palace, had originally purchased the land where it sits in hopes of making some money in real estate. But when the venture was unsuccessful, the land was given to the King's minister of Finance, who proposed to transform it into public square. Appearing octagonal in shape, the square was to be built near the site formerly occupied by the palace of the First Duke of Vendome. Later, when the land passed from the minister to King Louis XIV, Mansart strived to  design the square to rival the Place des Vosges, which had a statue of the king's predecessor - Louis XIII - at its center. Similar to the Place des Vosges, Mansart made all the buildings on the square identical, with arched ground floors and tall-windowed second floors. Pilasters and ornamental pillars were placed between each set of windows. Place Vendôme was originally known as Place des Conquêtes (Conquests Square) but was later renamed to Place Louis le Grand (Louis the Great Square) when things weren't going so well for Louis' armies. However, a statue of the king was indeed erected in the square and remained there for about a hundred years until it was torn down in 1792, during the French Revolution. Colonne Vendôme: the column you will find today in the center of the square was erected by Napoleon as the Colonne d'Austerlitz. The 44 meter tall column is modeled after Rome's Trajan Column. It was built to commemorate the victory at Austerlitz in 1805, one of Napoleon's greatest victories. The column's continuous ribbon of bas-relief bronze plates by the sculptor Pierre-Nolasque Bergeret were made from 1200 cannons taken from the combined armies of Russia and Austria during that battle. The reliefs depict scenes during the Napoleonic Wars between 1805 and 1807. The column was first known as the Colonne d'Austerlitz and it later was given the names of Colonne de la Victoire (Victory Column) and Colonne de la Grande Armée (Column of the Great Army). Today it is commonly known as the Colonne Vendôme. A statue of Napoleon was installed at the top of the column in 1810. Later, the statue of the emperor was removed and the bronze melted down to provide the bronze for the recast of the equestrian statue of Henri IV on the Pont Neuf. A new statue was installed in 1833 which was later replaced by the statue that is seen today. It was erected by Napoleon III and depicts Napoleon I as a Roman emperor. The buildings on Place Vendôme serve today as residences as well as retail stores, including those belonging to two famous jewelers and a number of well-known dress designers. The very expensive Hotel Ritz and Hotel Vendôme are also located on the square. A number of famous people have also lived along Place Vendôme, including composer Frédéric Chopin (who died in no. 12), author George Sand and Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, who resided at the Ritz for a while. Ernest Hemingway even claimed to have helped liberate the Ritz in 1944.

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From Place Vendôme - head northeast toward Rue Danielle Casanova, 110 m. Turn left onto Rue des Capucines, 90 m. Turn right onto Rue Volney, 150 m.  and in the intersection of rue Volney and rue Daunou you see this fresco:

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Head northwest on Rue Daunou toward Boulevard des Capucines, 45 m. Turn left onto Boulevard des Capucines, 160 m. Continue onto Boulevard de la Madeleine, 250 m. Slight left onto Place de la Madeleine for 25 m. to see L'église de la Madeleine (Paroisse de la Madeleine) on your right.  To its south lies the Place de la Concorde, to the east is the Place Vendôme, and to the west Saint-Augustin, Paris. The Madeleine Church is located between Place de la Concorde and the Opéra Garnier, in Haussmannian Paris. Its construction begins in 1764 and ends in 1842. The Madeleine Church was designed in its present form as a temple to the glory of Napoleon's army. Napoleon's wish was to make it a pantheon to the glory of his armies.  In 1806 Napoleon made his decision to erect a memorial, a Temple de la Gloire de la Grande Armée ("Temple to the Glory of the Great Army"); following an elaborate competition with numerous entries and a jury that decided on a design by the architect Claude Étienne de Beaumont (1757–1811), the Emperor trumped all, instead commissioning Pierre-Alexandre Vignon (1763–1828) to build his design on an antique temple (Compare the Maison Carrée, in Nîmes) The then-existing foundations were razed, preserving the standing columns, and work begun anew. With completion of the Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel in 1808, the original commemorative role for the temple was reduced. After the fall of Napoleon, with the Catholic reaction during the Restoration, King Louis XVIII determined that the structure would be used as a church, dedicated to Mary Magdalene. In 1837 it was briefly suggested that the building might best be utilised as a railway station, but the building was finally consecrated as a church in 1842. The funeral of Chopin at the Church of the Madeleine in Paris was delayed almost two weeks, until October 30, 1849. Chopin had requested that Mozart's Requiem be sung. The Requiem had major parts for female voices, but the Church of the Madeleine had never permitted female singers in its choir. The Church finally relented, on condition that the female singers remain behind a black velvet curtain.

Its appearance, typical for a religious building, has the form of a Greek temple without cross or bell tower. The Madeleine is built in the Neo-Classical style and was inspired by the much smaller Maison Carrée in Nîmes, one of the best-preserved of all Roman temples. It is one of the earliest large neo-classical buildings to imitate the whole external form of a Roman temple, rather than just the portico front. Its fifty-two Corinthian columns, each 20 metres high, are carried around the entire building.  Before entering through the two monumental bronze doors, you can admire the Corinthian columns that surround the building.

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La Madeleine interiors: sculptures, paintings and the famous mosaic (composed by Charles-Joseph Lameire) in neo-Byzantine style. Inside, the church has a single nave with three domes over wide arched bays, lavishly gilded in a decor inspired as much by Roman baths as by Renaissance artists. At the rear of the church, above the high altar, stands a statue by Charles Marochetti depicting St Mary Magdalene being lifted up by angels which evokes the tradition concerning ecstasy which she entered in her daily prayer while in seclusion. The half-dome above the altar is frescoed by Jules-Claude Ziegler, entitled The History of Christianity, showing the key figures in the Christian religion with — a sign of its Second Empire date — Napoleon occupying centre stage.

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Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

The church has a celebrated, magnificent pipe organ, built by Aristide Cavaillé-Coll in 1845.

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Throughout the year, day and night, the church organizes high quality classical music concerts. Masses and other religious services are celebrated daily. Funerals and weddings in Paris are still celebrated here.

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Place de la Concorde from La Madeleine:

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From L'église de la Madeleine head northeast toward Place de la Madeleine, 10 m. Turn right onto Place de la Madeleine, 45 m. Turn left onto Rue Tronchet, 300 m. Turn RIGHT to rue Auber to face the  Magasin Printemps Haussmann department store. A fabulous icon of Paris! The main entrance to this grandiose shopping centre is from 64, Boulevard Haussmann. Guided excursions of this wonderful 4-buildings complex are conducted from Spring (May) 2020: Duration: 90 mins, Price: €13.50. The building itself is a marvel of architecture! Constructed in 1865 by the visionary Jules Jaluzot and listed as a historical monument, Printemps Haussmann is today one of Paris's leading department stores. More than 44,000 m² devoted to luxury goods, fashion, glamour and dream products. Non EU visitors can get a 10% discount card when presenting your passport to the customer service agents, so be sure to stop by before shopping. 25 floors over 4 buildings. 1 million references and over 300 brands sold exclusively. With its magnificent art deco cupola, its Haussmannian facade and spectacular window displays, Printemps Haussmann offers you an unforgettable experience at the heart of Parisian style and fashion, and offers you the opportunity to find the latest in fashion, luxury, home-ware and beauty all in one place through a selection of great French and international brands. Printemps Haussmann and fashion go together and the store reflects current trends and invents new concepts. In 2001, Printemps Haussmann unveiled its new showcase for luxury goods, Printemps du Luxe; in 2003, it inaugurated the biggest beauty space in the world; in 2006 an entire floor devoted to footwear opened (over 3,000 m²), as well as a Food Hall grouping together the 10 biggest brands in luxury gastronomy and delicatessen. Even with the discount, it is very easy to spend over €175.01 to be eligible for a VAT refund, but be sure to do so in the same store on the same day. Bear in mind - for shopping lovers you can spend all day even if you don't buy anything. Have a coffee and get rest. Note: when you are trying clothes - keep your eye on your belongings !!!

Open from Monday to Saturday from 9.35 to 20.00 and on Thursday until 20.45. On Sunday from 11.00 to 19.00:

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The majestic glass dome – measuring 20 metres in diameter – that overhangs the building at 50 metres high!:

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The Printemps has a panoramic terrace with an exceptional views over Paris from the 8th floor. Note: You can enjoy majestic views of Paris, FREE, from the 8th floor of the western, NEW wing of the Printemps complex (the building with the men's clothing), aside to the fabulous rooftop restaurant. You enter the terrace (after exiting the elevator) not from the cafe' - but, from a side door leading to the viewing terrace (with your face to the terrace, on the right edge of the cafe'). The cafe'/bar area is quite small but really cute. On sunny days it might be crowded. Even if you can't afford to shop here come on up for the view - it's free!

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Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Printemps Haussmann also offers 7 eateries for coffee & tea, traditional meals, as well as a wide choice of cuisine. The restaurant on the NEW wing is recommended: AC, budget prices, wide selection (if you come at the traditional Parisian service hours...) and nice, panoramic views.

From the Printemps shopping complex we head to  a short view of the Opéra Garnier. Head west on Rue de Provence toward Rue de Caumartin, 15 m. Turn left onto Rue de Caumartin, 130 m. Slight left BACK onto Rue Auber, 220 m. Turn left onto Rue Scribe, 15 m. Rue Scribe is named after the playwright Eugène Scribe (1791-1861). Very aristocratic shops and hotels along this road. Turn right, 20 m. Turn left, 40 m. to see the Palais Garnier, Place de l'Opéra in front of you. How to get there: Opera (metro lines 3, 7, 8). Prices of Guided Tours: Adult: €17.00,  Child: €10.20. With The Paris Pass - FREE. Guided Tours times in English: Monday - Sunday: 11.00 & 14.30. Tours use a headphone broadcast system. Customers will be required to leave a piece of ID (either passport or ID card) in exchange for the broadcast device, which will be returned at the end of the tour. One piece of ID per family is required. If you would like a guided tour, enter through the door located in the corner of rue Auber and rue du Scribe. Please arrive 30 minutes prior to the tour’s departure in order to pass the security check, then head to the guided tours counter (on the right after the security checkpoint). This nineteenth century Opera House is one of the most opulent buildings in Paris and one of the most recognized opera houses in the world. Commissioned by Napoleon III, it was created by Charles Garnier in the popular Beaux Arts style of the time with heavy glass chandeliers, sweeping marble staircases and gilt decorations. It has seven tonne chandelier of pure bronze and crystal. The huge chandelier that hangs in the Opera house weighs an impressive seven tonnes and was criticized at first as it obstructed the view of those in the fourth level. The bronze and crystal chandelier that hangs in the Opera House is one of the world’s most famous. Allegedly in the late 1890s, the counterweight of the chandelier broke and fell through the ceiling, resulting in the death of a member of the audience. Unfortunate as it was, it was drawn on for a scene in the Phantom of the Opera. Despite its slight obstruction of the view from the fourth level at the time, it has come to represent one of the most iconic features of the Garnier Opera House. The Grand Staircase is made of white Italian marble. Garnier designed the staircase like a theater itself, so that the opera-goers could admire each other like a show of everyone in costume before the performance. The sweeping marble staircase is one of the most impressive features of the Opera Garnier and was inspired by Victor Louis’ Grand Theater in Bordeaux. Flanked by 30 monolithic marble columns, and illuminated with great candelabras, don’t forget to admire the ceiling frescoes painted by Isidore Pils. A marble rainbow, the staircase is made up of white marble from Italy, green marble from Sweden, as well as red marble – not to mention French jasper and onyx added for good measure! The Grand Foyer is dedicated to allegorical muses decorated with frescoes and mosaics. Charles Garnier pioneered the use of mosaics as a decorative method in France and embellished the vaults leading up to the Grand Foyer fully with intricate patterns. Inlaid in the gold ground are the allegorical figures of Diana, Eurydice, Aurora and Psyche. Measuring an impressive 154m long, the foyer is bookended by two huge fireplaces, and not to mention the detailed fresco which stretches across the ceiling, painted by Paul Baudry in 1874. There are also marble rotundas for the high society. The ‘subscriber’s rotunda’ was a gallery for the most seasoned visitors, usually the elite of Paris. They would entertain guests in private boxes and benefited from VIP treatment. Although the rooms were finished-off slightly behind schedule and their decorative themes were in reverse, you can admire the 16 Italian marble columns and look out for Garnier’s signature engraved in the columns – which was frowned upon at the time! Now home to the Paris Ballet, it has a 2,000 seat theater and is as resplendent as it used to be and a must-see on any trip to Paris. Many buildings around the world have been inspired by the Garnier Opera House, including the Thomas Jefferson Building in Washington, the Juliusz Słowacki Theatre in Kraków and the Theatro Municipal do Rio de Janeiro to name a few… The interiors are incredible. Unforgettable experience. One of the highlights of Paris. The beauty and opulence of this Belle Epoch masterpiece cannot be over stated. The Marc Chagall ceiling is amazing. A fascinating exhibition on the rise and fall of French grand opera is on in the library-museum until February, 2020. Note: the Auditorium is NOT always open. Be prepared to a high volume of visitors in rather small areas.
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Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Opéra Garnier - the Northern facade - rue Halevy:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

The Musée du Parfum, 3-5 Square de l'Opéra-Louis Jouvet, is in the southern side of the Opera Square. Guided tours of the Musee de Parfum Fragonard: with The Paris Pass - FREE. Normal Entry Price: FREE. It is a 30-minute tour and comes complete with a little gift. Plus some fun nose testing and great wholesale prices at the end. Additionally, of course, the chance to buy some of the fragrances. These perfumes are very nice, and the collection of three or five sample bottles are an economical way to provide gifts for those at home who expect them! Great tour to know the perfumes' history and how it is made. How to get there: Metro: Opéra (lines 3, 7, 8), Madeleine (12, 14), Havre-Caumartin (9) Saint-Lazare (13). RER A Auber, RER E Haussmann Saint-Lazare. Buses: 21, 22, 27, 52, 53, 66, 68, 81, 95. Reduced-mobility access. Fragonard have been creating perfumes using traditional techniques and modern methods since 1926. The first of Fragonard's museums, Le Musée du Parfum, is in a beautiful 19th-century town house, housing a collection of perfumery objects from throughout the ages. The second museum, the Théâtre Musée des Capucines, first opened in 1900 and charts 3000 years of perfume-making through a selection of Fragonard perfume bottles. Visit their miniature factory and explore a range of 19th-century copper distilling apparatus and learn the different methods for extracting raw materials. The Museum reveals the secrets of perfume making, as well as a magnificent collection of precious perfume bottles from antiquity to the present day. The venue was once a theater and then a velodrome for the elegant ladies of Paris. 

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

From the Musée du Parfum - head north on Rue Scribe toward Impasse Sandrie, 40 m. Turn right BACK onto Rue Auber, 120 m. Slight BACK right onto Place de l'Opéra, 100 m. Turn left onto Rue du 4 septembre, 300 m. It is named for the date of 4 September 1870, the date Napoleon III fell and the Third French Republic was proclaimed. The neighborhood around Opéra and Bourse is a Belle époque paradise of grand boulevards, refined arcades,
and mass-market Art-Nouveau entertainment. Here, modern day workers continue to take advantage of the legacy that nobility and finance left in the 19th century. Brightly-lit brasseries, theaters, and cinemas sit side by side with French bistros predominating in one area and Japanese restaurants in
another. The Le Centorial building is in 18 Rue du 4 Septembre. Listed as a historical heritage, this building built at the end of the 19th century was the seat of Lyonnais Credit insurance company for many years. It is now a business center where Echos and other large companies are located, so it is not open to the public, you can just enter part of the entrance hall. Several architects have left their mark, including Bouwens, Narjoux, Laloux and above all Eiffel, which created the glass roof. Jean-Jacques Ory then restructured. It is truly a magnificent building that combines history and modernity.

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

300 m. further east along Rue du 4 Septembre you arrive, again, to the Bourse. The most notable building on this street is the Palais Brogniart or the house of the Paris Bourse, or Stock Excahnge now part of Euronext. The rest of the building is for events, meetings and exhibitions. No entrance to the stock exchange. The metro stop on the corner is Bourse:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip Continuing east, the street names changes to Rue Réaumur. 4 Septembre and Réaumur are beautiful streets in the second Arrondissement. We found these roads to be the most architecturally, beautiful ones in Paris. What's remarkable is the amazingly beautiful old architecture of the buildings. Rue Reaumur is so called after the French scientist Rene-Antoine Ferchault de Reaumur. When this street was developed in the Nineteenth Century, there was a competition among architects for the best designs, so there are lots of adventurous buildings along it. So make sure you look up to check things out. During the weekdays - the streets might be noisy:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

WE turn RIGHT (south) at rue Montmartre. This is a pleasant, shady and charming street ending, after walking  550 m. southward - to Église Saint-Eustache, 2 Impasse Saint-Eustache. Opening hours: Monday to Friday : 9.30 to 19.00 ; Saturday : 10.00 to 19.15; Sunday: 9.15 to 19.15. Organ recitals : Sundays from 17.30 to 18.00. FREE. The Eglise Saint-Eustache in the heart of Les Halles is one of the most visited churches in Paris. It is known for its unusually large dimensions, which make it seem more like a cathedral than a church, and the wealth of art works it houses. The most interesting outside view is from the large esplanade in front of Les Halles forum. The church was built in 1532 and subsequently restored in 1840, and therefore uses a variety of styles: the façade is Gothic, while the interior is in the Renaissance and classical styles. The inside is quite dark (very Gothic in that sense). You should pay attention to the beautiful Chapel of the Virgin and its paintings, to the Mausoleum of Colbert (famous Minister under Louis XIV). The organ of Saint-Eustache is the biggest pipe organ in France, counting 8000 pipes, and its resident organist gives a free concert on Sunday afternoons. The organ at St Eustache isn’t a Cavaille-Col but it is arguably the biggest organ and has the biggest sound you are ever going to hear. Though the church is continually undergoing some renovation or another, one does feel the grandeur of the vaulting and can sit and relax and/or reflect for a bit. In keeping with its longstanding tradition of classical music, the church hosts performances all year round by symphony orchestras and choral ensembles such as Chœurs de Radio France and the Orchestre National de France; its concerts feature on the programme of prestigious festivals like the Festival d’Automne à Paris and Paris Quartier d’Été.

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Move to Tip 2 below.

Citywalk

From Église Saint-Eustache we walk 750 m. south to the Pont Neuf Metro station - crossing the wonderful the Forum des Halles gardens. Head northeast on Impasse Saint-Eustache toward Rue Montmartre, 45 m. Turn right onto Rue Montmartre, 75 m. From here you walk SOUTHWARD across the Forum des Halles gardens.

Forum des Halles:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Forum des Halles gardens were opened for pedestrians on 19 May 2019.  Fantastic reconstruction. In the heart of them - is the Jardin Nelson Mandela with playgrounds for children. The (RENOVATED with huge investment and managed by Westfield) Forum des Halles shopping centre is surrounded by a park filled with benches, fountains, street entertainers, statues and a wonderful area to relax, people watch and enjoy the day. That’s before you even step inside to delight in everything the mall has to offer, which is more than you can imagine or have the time to visit every store inside. Marvelous green gem in Paris. Located in the very heart of Paris, the Les Halles area owes its name to the large iron pavilions that once covered what was a bustling and popular fresh food market — most famously depicted in Emile Zola’s 19th century novel “The Belly of Paris.” In 1971 the markets were dismantled and relocated to Rungis, in the capital’s southern suburbs. The Forum des Halles shopping center opened in 1979, the adjoining gardens in 1986. The refurbished shopping center (completed at 2018) attracted 40 million visitors per year from 2018. The 40 million shoppers it currently attracts makes it the second busiest shopping center in Europe, after the 4 Temps mall in La Défense which welcomes over 46 million visitors each year 

Turn right onto Allée André Breton, 200 m. You exit the Des Halles gardens. Turn left onto Rue Berger, 5 m. Turn right onto Place Maurice Quentin, 35 m. Slight left onto Rue du Pont Neuf, 350 m. Turn right onto Quai du Louvre to face the Pont Neuf Metro station.

Forum des Halles gardens near Église Saint-Eustach:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

The gardens from rue Pont Neuf:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Église Saint-Eustache from Pont Neuf:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

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