Paris - From Île de la Cité to the Church of St Eustache

MAY 20,2017 - MAY 20,2017 (1 DAYS)

France

1 DAYS

Citywalk

Paris - From Île de la Cité to the Church of St Eustache :

Part 1 Main Attractions: Marche aux fleurs (the Flowers Market), Conciergerie, Palais de Justice de Paris, Sainte Chapelle, Pont au Change, Place du Châtelet, Hôtel de Ville de Paris, Pont Saint-Louis, Ile Saint-Louis, Quai d'Anjou, Quai de Bourbone, Pont Louis-Philippe, Rue de Rivoli, the Pavee synagogue, the Carnavalet Museum, Place des Vosges.

Part 2 Main Attractions: Place des Vosges, Place de Thorigny, Archives Nationales - Hôtel de Rohan, Centre Georges Pompidou, Quartier de l'Horloge, Église Saint-Eustache.

Start:  La Cité Metro station. End: Les Halles Metro station. Duration : 1 day. Distance: 13 km. Weather: All our itinerary is outdoor. Must be a bright (or, at least, cloudy) day. No rain or wind.

Our Itinerary

From Île de la Cité Metro station head southeast on Rue de Lutèce toward Rue de la Cité, 30 m. Turn left onto Rue de la Cité, 70 m. Turn left toward Allée Célestin Hennion, 50 m. Then, turn right, still into Allée Célestin Hennion and you enter the Marche aux Fleurs et aux Oiseaux 20 m. further. We start where we stopped our daily tour at 19/5/17. The Notre Dame Flower Market & Bird Market  (Marche aux Fleurs et aux Oiseaux) is open 7 days a week and it is only 3 rows of stalls. During MON-SAT it is a Flower Market. On Sundays it turns to be Birds (& small pets) market (Marché aux Oiseaux). The market is a long standing institution that is located on the Île de la Cité, an island right in the middle of the famed Seine. It is not far from Notre Dame Cathedral. Very nice to walk through and browse for gift buys such as Provence lavender products and decor items. The flowers and the birds are not intended for tourists. The flowers market is very nice and attractive. The birds market is different. Numerous species of birds are housed in cages that are stacked several layers high. The market’s winged residents include parakeets, finches, canaries, doves and more exotic would-be pets such as parrots and macaws. Several birds looked miserable into their small cages. Anyway, if you are seeking colorful scenes or atmosphere - you found a good place. The street markets are part of what makes Paris attractive to visitors. These places can be seen as sightseeing spectacles, but they are also examples of a kind of traditional casual community retail that most of the rest of the world has long since forgotten about. Opening hours: 08.00 - 19.00:

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Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

We entered the  Marche aux Fleurs et aux Oiseaux from its southern entrance and leave it from its northern exit. Head north on Allée Célestin Hennion toward Quai de la Corse, 30 m. Before you turn left - note this marvelous sundial in the intersection of Quai de l'Horloge and Boulevard:

Tour de l'Horloge - In 1370, Charles V had the monumental clock restored many times and in 2012 for the last time. The clock tower is located at the northern corner of the Conciergerie, which has been the residence of the kings of France since 940. The clock tower is massive and rectangular, surmounted by a lantern that dates from 1350, under John II Le Bon. In 1370, Henri Le Vic, clock maker Lorraine, is charged by Charles V, the realization of the clock which is backed to the facade of the tower on the side of the Boulevard du Palais. Then, a year later, she has a silver bell to ring the clock. Over time, this clock undergoes transformations. Being placed on a place where justice must reign, it is decorated with the allegories of the Law and Justice, which we see today. Under Henry III, the sculptor Armand Pilon (1528-1590), made new decorations of the clock. The dial is square in shape and is decorated with golden rays. The setting of the clock is then placed on a blue starry background of lily flowers of the royal mantle and lyres. The frames are gilded with festoons. The needles are, for the great of the minutes, ended by a spearhead, for the small of the hours, it is finished by a fleur de lys. The ends of the hands are terminated by a crescent moon. The numbers are in roman characters. The whole is protected by a rounded canopy with gilding and boxes. The pediment is flanked by the royal coat of arms of France with fleurs de Lys and Henri III, as Valois, king of France and Poland, with a golden "H". Two cartouches engraved with gilding on a black background, in Latin, refer to Henry III for that of the High and alludes to the virtues of Justice for the lower one. . Since its restoration in 2012, this clock appears in all its splendor. It is undoubtedly a work of art!

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Turn left onto Quai de la Corse, 100 m. Along the 100 first metres in Boulevard du Palais - you will se, on your right, three famous building of Paris. From north to south - they are:

The Conciergerie: formerly a prison but presently used mostly for law courts. It was part of the former royal palace, the Palais de la Cité, which consisted of the Conciergerie, Palais de Justice and the Sainte-Chapelle. The Salle des Gardes (Guards Room) and the immense Salle des Gens d'armes (Hall of the soldiers), built under King Philip the Fair, still remain from the days of the medieval palace, as do the kitchens built under King John the Good. The Kings of France abandoned the palace at the end of the 14th century to settle in the Louvre and in Vincennes. It then took on a judicial role, and part of the palace was converted into prison cells. The Conciergerie became one of the principal places of detention during the French Revolution, with the installation of the Revolutionary Court. Hundreds of prisoners during the French Revolution were taken from the Conciergerie to be executed by guillotine at a number of locations around Paris. Its most famous prisoner was Marie-Antoinette. During the Restoration, a commemorative chapel was erected on the site of her cell. You can follow the steps of the accused from reception to cells to departing for an appointment with the Guillotine. Quite unpleasant atmosphere and dull, empty halls full with horrible history and period. Not much to see.  Not for children. Opening hours: everyday 9.30-18.00. Closed: 1 JAN, 1 MAY, 25 DEC. Price: 9€.  Under 26 years: 7€. Combined ticket Conciergeri AND Sainte-Chapelle - Full price : 15 €, Reduced price : 12,50 €. 

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Palais de Justice de Paris  (Palace of Justice), 10 Boulevard du Palais: Regularly, no access for the public. Security is maintained by gendarmes. The justice of the state has been dispensed at this site since medieval times. From the sixteenth century to the French Revolution this was the seat of the Parlement de Paris. The building was reconstructed between 1857 and 1868 by architects Joseph-Louis Duc and Honoré Daumet. The exterior includes sculptural work by Jean-Marie Bonnassieux. It was opened in October 1868. It was awarded the Grand Prix de l'Empereur as the greatest work of art produced in France in the decade. The building exteriors are monumental and very impressive. The western facade (facing Place Dauphine) and the southern one (facing Sainte-Chapelle) are exceptional. Opening hours: MON-FRI: 08.30 - 18.30. Closed: SAT-SUN. Entry - FREE. 

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Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip Sainte Chapelle: Construction began some time after 1238 and the chapel was consecrated on 26 April 1248. Its design by Raymond du Temple and Pierre de Montereau was based on that of the Sainte-Chapelle in Paris, although the version at Vincennes only had a single level (20m high) compared to the two levels of the Paris version. On Charles V's death in 1380, work on the chapel continued under his successor Charles VI, under whose rule the choir, the two oratories, the sacristy and the treasury were all completed, with the treasury housing the relics. The nave's construction continued but the works slowed during the Hundred Years War. The facade was only completed in 1480, by Louis XI of France. Under Francis I of France, the ordinary almoner to the king, Guillaume Crétin, also served as the chapel's treasurer, before becoming cantor at the main Sainte-Chapelle in Paris. The Sainte-Chapelle is considered among the highest achievements of the Rayonnant period of Gothic architecture. It was commissioned by King Louis IX of France to house his collection of Passion relics, including Christ's Crown of Thorns - one of the most important relics in medieval Christendom, now hosted in Notre-Dame Cathedral. Having these sacred relics in his possession made the already powerful monarch head of western Christianity. 

 The interior decoration was only finished under Henry II of France, who in 1551 moved the order of Saint Michael's base from Mont-Saint-Michel to Vincennes. The following year he inaugurated the chapel. In 1793, during the French Revolution, the interior decoration was destroyed, the stained glass windows smashed and the Baptistery of Saint Louis (long held in the chapel's treasury and used from at least as early as Louis XIII as the baptismal font for children of the French royal family) moved to the Louvre Museum. The chapel houses the tombs of Bernardin Gigault (who died at Vincennes in 1694) and Louis Antoine, Duke of Enghien. The latter was executed in 1804 in the moat of the Château de Vincennes, near a grave which had already been prepared; in 1816, his remains were exhumed and placed in the chapel.

Inside are stunning stained glass windows. Arranged across 15 windows, each 15 metres high, the stained glass panes depict 1,113 scenes from the Old and New Testaments recounting the history of the world until the arrival of the relics in Paris.

Opening hours: FROM 2 JANUARY TO 31 MARCH: everyday 
9.00-17.00. FROM 1ST APRIL TO 30 SEPTEMBER: everyday 9.00-19.00. FROM 1ST OCTOBER TO 31 DECEMBER: everyday 9.00-17.00. Closed: 1 January, 1 May and 25 December. Prices: FULL PRICE: 10€, CONCESSIONS: 8€. 
COMBINED TICKET FOR CONCIERGERIE AND SAINTE-CHAPELLE: Full price : 15 €, concessions:12,50 €.

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Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

From Sainte-Chapelle we RETURN (with our face to the northeast) on Boulevard du Palais toward Quai de la Corse, 95 m. Return back left onto Quai de l'Horloge, and the Pont au Change, 2 Quai de la Mégisserie is on your right. The bridge connects the Île de la Cité to the Right Bank, at the Place du Châtelet. It owes its name to the goldsmiths and money changers who had installed their shops on an earlier version of the bridge in the 12th century. We cross the Seine river over Pont au Change and turn RIGHT (east) to Quai de Gesvres. The name recalls that this quay was built on land granted by Louis XIII to René Potier de Tresmes , marquess of Tresmes, became duke in 1648, and whose son changed the name of Tresmes en Gesvres (or Gevres), lordship that the family had acquired.

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As we cross the bridge - we see, opposite,  the Fontaine du Châtelet. The Place du Châtelet  is at the north end of the Pont au Change. The closest métro station is Châtelet. The name "Châtelet" refers to the stronghold, the Grand Châtelet, that guarded the northern end of the Pont au Change, containing the offices of the prévôt de Paris and a number of prisons, until it was demolished from 1802-10. At the square's center is the Fontaine du Palmier, designed in 1806 by architect and engineer François-Jean Bralle (1750-1832) to celebrate French victories in battle. It has a circular basin, 6 m. in diameter, from which a column rises in the form of a palm tree's trunk 18 m.  tall. The palm trunk is surmounted by a gilded figure of the goddess, Victory, holding a laurel wreath in each upraised hand; the goddess figure stands on a base ornamented with bas-relief eagles. The gilded finial is by sculptor Louis-Simon Boizot:

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Two identical-looking theatres stand facing the square, the Théâtre du Châtelet and the Théâtre de la Ville, both designed by architect Gabriel Davioud and completed between 1860 and 1862 as part of Baron Haussmann's grand reconfiguration of Paris. Quai de Gesvres continues south-east (the Seine is on our right) as Quai de l'Hôtel de ville. The Hôtel de ville is on our left. The Hôtel de Ville de Paris has been the seat of the Paris City Council since 1357. The current building, with a neo-renaissance style, was built by architects Théodore Ballu and Edouard Deperthes on the site of the former Hôtel de Ville which burnt down during the Paris Commune in 1871. Visits to the town hall, a powerful and prestigious place, are possible. Guided tours are offered by reservation only and are organized by the city’s Protocol Department. Visitors can discover the function room, created as a replica of the Hall of Mirrors at Versailles. Free major exhibitions are also organized here and are a great success. The south wing was originally constructed by François I beginning in 1535 until 1551. The north wing was built by Henry IV and Louis XIII between 1605 and 1628. It was burned by the Paris Commune, along with all the city archives that it contained, during the Commune's final days in May 1871. The outside was rebuilt following the original design, but larger, between 1874 and 1882, while the inside was considerably modified. It has been the headquarters of the municipality of Paris since 1357. It serves multiple functions, housing the local administration, the Mayor of Paris (since 1977), and also serves as a venue for large receptions. Since the French Revolution, the building has been the scene of a number of historical events, notably the proclamation of the French Third Republic in 1870 and the speech by Charles de Gaulle on 25 August 1944 during the Liberation of Paris when he greeted the crowd from a front window. Entrance at 29 rue de Rivoli. Open: Every day except on Sundays and bank holidays. FREE. 

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Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

From the Hôtel de Ville we head south on Quai de l'Hôtel de ville, 100 m. We turn right to stay on Quai de l'Hôtel de ville, 45 m. Turn left onto Pont d'Arcole, 110 m. Turn left onto Quai aux Fleurs, 300 m. Continue onto Quai de l'Archevêché, 35 m. Turn Left, 60 m.  and you are in the Notre Dame Cathedral gardens  where the Deportation Martyrs Memorial is on your left and the eastern facade of Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris is on your right:

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Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

From the Notre-Dame gardens we continue eastward onto Pont Saint-Louis, 100 m. The Pont Saint-Louis is the only bridge in Paris linking Ile de la Cité and Ile Saint-Louis. For pedestrians only, it is used more as a footbridge than a bridge. Walks around here are delightful. Stroll around and enjoy views of the Seine, the chevet of Notre-Dame, and Hôtel de Ville. On a sunny day, street performances often take place:Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

This small island, Ile Saint-Louis,  is like an oasis from the rush of the city. It's almost as if someone dropped a small French village into the center of Paris. It contains everything you would want from your neighborhood: markets, bakeries, fromageries, and cafes. While much of Paris has modernized over the years, this island remains romantically frozen in the 17th century. It is remarkably the same as it was centuries ago. It is full of seductive boutiques, is home to its own unique ice cream, and features historic attractions. For example, if you slight right onto Rue Saint-Louis en l'Île, 120 m. - you see Bamyan at 72 Rue Saint-Louis en l'Île:

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La Cour Gourmande at 55 Rue Saint-Louis en l'Îl:

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You can see nostalgic pictures of Ile Saint-Louis - at 51 Rue Saint-Louis en l'Îl (They are taken from the Jeu de Paume: A leading pole for the exhibition of photographic and other images, from the 19th to the 21st century (cinema, video, installation, etc.) in Place de Concorde: 

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At #29-31 you find the Berthillon ice cream: The only true Berthillon can be found in the few small blocks that make up the Ile Saint-Louis. This delicious ice cream has rich colors and equally intense flavors. It comes in myriad flavors, but the dark chocolate (chocolat noir) and mango (mangue) are without peer. Summer or winter, this is a real Parisian delight. Here, at 29-31, Rue St. Louis-en-l'Ile, it was started:

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At #2 Rue Saint-Louis en l'Îl stands The Hôtel Lambert which is a hôtel particulier, a grand mansion townhouse, on the Quai Anjou on the eastern tip of the Île Saint-Louis. In the 19th century, the name Hôtel Lambert also came to designate a political faction of Polish exiles associated with Prince Adam Jerzy Czartoryski, who had purchased the Hôtel Lambert:

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Head northwest on Rue Saint-Louis en l'Île toward Rue de Bretonvilliers, 120 m. Turn right onto Rue Poulletier, 80 m. and walk westward along Quai d'Anjou. This angled embankment lined with beautiful trees is home to several fine mansions: the Hôtel de Lauzun, at n° 17, built in 1657 and famous for hosting Théophile Gautier and Baudelaire. Completely renovated in 2013 by the City of Paris, it is now home to the Institute of Advanced Studies, a body devoted to scientific research. At n° 9 stands the house where the caricaturist Honoré Daumier depicted the trials and tribulations of the July monarchy. In front is Pont Marie: 

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Continuing walking north-west - we walk along Quai de Bourbone. With its chain-linked stone posts, 18C canted medallions and view of the Saint Gervais St-Protais church, this tip of the island is an impressive sight. The magnificent mansions at nos. #15 and #19 were once the workshops of artists Ernest Meissonnier, Émile Bernard and Camille Claudel:

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We turn RIGHT and cross the Seine over Pont Louis-Philippe. It links the Quai de Bourbon on the Île Saint-Louis with the Saint-Gervais neighborhood on the right bank. It was built to commemorate the accession of King Louis-Philippe after the Revolution of 1830.

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We return to Quai Hôtel de Ville and walk 550 m. with our face to the north-west until we turn RIGHT onto Rue de Lobau. Here we see the back side (north side) of the Hôtel de Ville de Paris:

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You walk 200 m. northward along Rue de Lobau. After crossing Rue de  Rivoli - you see department store Le BHV Marais on your left. We ate in the 5th floor restaurant of this department store: clean, filling and not expensive. 17.30 euros for main dish of chicken, 2 portions of cooked vegetables and light drinks for 2 persons. You turn right to Rue de Rivoli. Every trip to Paris should include a walk and window shopping or even real shopping along this famous street. It houses all the major fashion labels in the world. Rue de Rivoli has pretty much every major brand name store on it and it runs through many famous "squares". It has many historical buildings on its pavements. One of the most famous Parisian streets, very enjoyable to visit and appreciate the architecture, the shops and overall its nice atmosphere:

 Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip On the 6th street or 600 m. walk (on the left side) - you turn left (north) to Rue Pavée. The Agoudas Hakehilos synagogue stands at 10 rue Pavée,  commonly referred to at the Pavee synagogue, rue Pavee synagogue, or Guimard synagogue. It was erected in 1913 by the architect Hector Guimard, and inaugurated on June 7, 1914. It hosted and hosts, mainly,  Orthodox Jews of primarily Russian origin. Its erection is a testament to the massive wave of immigration from Eastern Europe that took place at the turn of the 20th century. It was funded by a wealthy Polish-Russian Jewish group. The furnishings (luminaires, chandeliers, brackets, and benches) as well as the stylized vegetal decorations made of staff and the cast iron railings are all creations of Hector Guimard. This was the only religious building by this architect, who was known for his Art Nouveau designs. During the year in 1934 a gas explosion destroyed the main hall which was rebuilt right after. On the evening of Yom Kippur in 1941, the building was dynamited along with six other Parisian synagogues.However the Bomb did not go off and the building was preserved . The synagogue is fully functional today:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip We continue walking north-east crossing Rue de Rosiers. When we arrive to Rue des Francs-Bourgeois - we turn to the left (north-west) :

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In the intersection of  Rue des Francs-Bourgeois and Rue de Sévigné - you see on your right the jardin de l'hôtel lamoignon. A small garden in the historic Mare district. Inside the garden there is a stunningly beautiful medieval Lemanon mansion (built in the 16th century by Renaissance architect Philibert Delorme), which now houses the City Hall Library. Here the author Alphonse Daudet lived in 1867:

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Several steps further along Rue de Sévigné - we saw the Carnavalet Museum which is dedicated to the history of Paris and its inhabitants and has collections illustrating the evolution of the city from prehistory through to the present day. THE MUSEUM is CLOSED. But we saw the inner court which is WONDERFUL .You can even find out in the open courtyard wall sculptures of allegorical female figures pouring water out of urns by the great French seventeenth century sculptor Goujon.

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Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

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Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Return to Rue des Francs Bourgeois and head southeast on Rue des Francs Bourgeois, cross (again) Rue de Sévigné and Rue de Tourenne:

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Rue de Tourenne x Rue des Francs Bourgeois:

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All in all - you walk 210 m.  until you arrive to the northern side of Place des Vosges. Skip to Tip 2 below.

Citywalk

Part 2 Main Attractions: Place des Vosges, Place de Thorigny, Archives Nationales - Hôtel de Rohan, Centre Georges Pompidou, Quartier de l'Horloge, Église Saint-Eustache.

Place des Vosges  was originally called place Royale.  What was new about the Place Royale in 1612 was that the house fronts were all built to the same design, probably by Jean Baptiste Androuet du Cerceau, of red brick with strips of stone quoins over vaulted arcades that stand on square pillars. The steeply-pitched blue slate roofs are pierced with discreet small-paned dormers above the pedimented dormers that stand upon the cornices. Only the north range was built with the vaulted ceilings that the "galleries" were meant to have. Two pavilions that rise higher than the unified roofline of the square center the north and south faces and offer access to the square through triple arches.The square was renamed after the French Revolution in tribute to the north-east region of Vosges, bordering Germany and Luxembourg, which was the first to pay taxes imposed by the new republican government. Place des Vosges is the "Cherry in the Cream Cake" of the Marais. The Place des Vosges is one of the oldest squares in Paris, and also one of the most beautiful. The composition of the Place des Vosges epitomizes the classic French style and is a unique example of seventeenth century architecture. Originally the terrace was covered with sand to allow aristocrats to indulge in equestrian exercises. A statue of Louis XIII was erected in the square, then destroyed in 1792 after the fall of the monarchy ; it was replaced by an octagonal fountain. It took until the early nineteenth century for the royal equestrian statues as well as that of Louis XIII, destroyed during the Revolution, to once again be rebuilt. The square was often the place for the nobility to chat, and served as a meeting place for them. This was so until the Revolution. As you walk along and admire the brick arches bordering the square, you will discover fabulous gourmet places to eat such as Carette or La Place Royale. Many art galleries line the Place des Vosges. Their large windows are open invitations to enter and discover their treasures and artists. 

Arcades of the East part - you can see the Queen Pavilion:

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East and southern parts - you can see the King Pavilion:

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Corot Fountain from 1825:

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Cafe Carrette - Place des Vosges:

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Art Symbol - Place des Vosges:

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Statue of Louis XIII:

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Place des Vosges is structured around two pavilions, that of the Queen at the north part of the square, and that of the King at the south part. They are not open to the public ; however, you can still visit the house of Victor Hugo, author of "Les Misérables", which is now a municipal museum. It is free and open daily from 9.00 to 18.00 every day except Mondays.

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In the most south-west edge of the Place des Vosges - you can see the Hotel de Sully Garden, 5 Place des Vosges. A small private door, open during the day, will give you access to the garden of this fabulous Hotel de Sully, which is, actually, the headquarters of the Center for National Monuments. The Center is home to an excellent library on the history of Paris which offers occasional photographic exhibitions on architecture and the arts. Don't forget to have a look at its Renaissance- style ceiling:

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Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

 Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

From the north-west end of Place des Vosges we walk west to connect and turn RIGHT (north) onto Rue de Tourenne. On the first turn to the left - we turn LEFT (west) to Rue du Parc Royal. Note the houses in numbers: 4, 8, 10 - they are 200 years old. On the second turn to the left is Rue Payenne. The Swedish Institute at #11 is under construction - but, you can find a splendid garden opposite this aristocratic building. We return to Rue du Parc Royal and continue walking westward until it ends in Place de Thorigny. This crossroads is so named because of the proximity of the neighboring street of the same name, which bears the name of Jean-Baptiste Claude Lambert of Thorigny who was president of the second chamber of petitions of the Parliament of Paris from 1713 to 1727. No. 1 is home to the hotel Libéral Bruant , a time transformed into a museum of locksmithing and, today, a center of exhibitions of modern art. Just a stone's throw away is the entrance to the Picasso Museum and the Musée Cognacq-Jay. Musée Picasso is immediately in Rue Thorigny. We ignore the Picasso Museum, at the moment, and turn north-west onto Rue de la Perle. On the first turn - we turn LEFT (South-west) to Rue Vieille-du-Temple. on our right, at #87 we see the Archives Nationales - Hôtel de Rohan. The Hotel de Rohan , built by the architect Pierre - Alexis Delamair , is from 1705 for the Rohan family . It now houses, with the adjacent hotel de Soubise , part of the National Archives . This monument has been classified as a historical monument since November 27 , 1924. In Hotel de Subise - Maximilien François Marie Isidore de Robespierre spent the night of 27-28 July 1794:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

We continue walking south-west along Rue Vieille-du-Temple and, on the 2nd intersection with Rue des Francs Bourgeois (we already walked via this road...) - we see this house:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Rue des Francs Bourgeois continues north-west as Rue Rambuteau. Named after the Count de Rambuteau who started the widening of the road prior to Haussmann's renovation of Paris. Philosopher Henri Lefebvre lived on the street and observed from his window the rhythms of everyday life at the intersection located behind the Centre Georges Pompidou. Rue Rambuteau is a street in central Paris that connects the neighborhood of Les Halles, in the 1st arrondissement, to the Marais district in the 4th arrondissement. It fronts the Forum of Les Halles and the north side of Centre Georges Pompidou, and marks the boundary between the 3rd and 4th arrondissements. When Rue Rambuteau crosses Rue du Temple - we see, on our right, the Musée d'art et d'histoire du Judaïsme. We are in the heart of the Marais.

At # 18 we see HURE - createur de Plaisir:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Approximately, 280-300 m. from the intersection with Rue du Temple, along Rue Rambuteau - we arrive to Centre Georges Pompidou, 31 Rue Beaubourg. The Centre Pompidou, designed by Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers, is a 20th-century architectural marvel, immediately recognizable by its exterior escalators and enormous coloured tubing. It is home to the National Museum of Modern Art and is internationally renowned for its 20th and 21st century art collections. The works of iconic artists are displayed chronologically over two sections: the modern period, from 1905 to 1960 (Matisse, Picasso, Dubuffet, etc.), and the contemporary period, from 1960 to the present day (Andy Warhol, Niki de Saint Phalle, Anish Kapoor, etc.). In addition to its permanent collections, internationally renowned exhibitions are organized every year on the top floor, where visitors can enjoy a breathtaking view of Paris and its rooftops. Everything you might need to spend a pleasant half-day, or indeed a day in the museum is available: eat at Le Georges, learn more at the public information library, and take a break browsing the shelves of the museum gift shop. At the foot of the Centre, the Atelier Brancusi presents a unique collection of works by this artist who played a major role in the history of modern sculpture. Rivals Musee d'Orsay. Exceptional museum. Note: the National Museum of Modern Art  is at the 5th level. The views of Paris from the top of the Centre are fantastic. Allow at least 3 hours to see everything inside. Plan a entire day if you are a true modern art appreciator. Amazing rooftop restaurant. Expensive. Public Transport: Metro: Rambuteau (line 11), Hôtel de Ville (lines 1 and 11), Châtelet (lines 1, 4, 7, 11 and 14), RER: Châtelet-les Halles (lines A, B and D), Buses: 29, 38, 47, 75.  Opening hours: Everyday from 11.00. to 22.00  (exhibition areas close at 21.00.) except Tuesdays and 1st of May. Thursdays until 23.00. (only exhibitions on level 6). Ticket offices shut one hour before closing time. Brancusi's Studio: Every day from 14.00-18.00 except Tuesdays and 1st of May. Prices: “Museum and exhibitions” ticket: adult - €14 , concessions:€11. View of Paris” ticket (does not give admission to the museum or exhibitions): €5.  “Show and concert” ticket: adult - c10 -  €18, concessions: €5 - €9 (price according to show). Paris Museum Pass: Pass valid for 60 museums and monuments in Paris and the Ile-de-France area, including the Museum of the Centre Pompidou. 2 days: €48, 4 days: €62, 6 days: €74. FREE for the 1st Sunday of every month:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Not less interesting is the Quartier de l'Horloge or the Clock district which is a group of buildings in the 3rd arrondissement of Paris located next to the Georges-Pompidou Center, between Saint-Martin (west), Rambuteau (south), Grenier-Saint-Lazare (north) and Beaubourg (east) streets. It was built by architect Jean-Claude Bernard in the 1970s. The district takes its name from an animated clock inaugurated on one of the facades of the district in 1979: The Defender of Time , created by the sculptor Jacques Monestier. The ensemble is built on the site of the unhealthy islet No. 1 of which only the facades of the rue Saint-Martin and four buildings of the rue Beaubourg dating from the beginning of the twentieth century have been preserved. It was inaugurated in November 1979:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

 Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

At the intersection of Rue Rambuteau and Rue Brantôme is a work by Max Ernst , The Grand Assistant:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

From Pompidou Centre return and turn right onto Rue Rambuteau, 600 m. Turn right onto Allée André Breton, 40 m. Turn left onto Rue Montmartre, 75 m, turn left onto Impasse Saint-Eustache, 40 m. to arrive to Église Saint-Eustache, 2 Impasse Saint-Eustache. The present building was built between 1532 and 1632. It resides near the site of Paris' medieval marketplace (Les Halles) and rue Montorgueil. The origins of Saint Eustache date back to the 13th century. A far smallert chapel was built in 1213, dedicated to Sainte-Agnès, a Roman martyr. The small chapel was funded by Jean Alais, a merchant at Les Halles who collected a tax on the sale of fish baskets as repayment of a loan to King Philippe-Auguste. The church became the parish church of the Les Halles area in 1223 and was renamed Saint-Eustache in 1303. The name of the church refers to Saint Eustace, a Roman general of the second century AD who was burned, along with his family, for converting to Christianity. The church was renamed for Saint Eustache after receiving relics related to the Roman martyr as donations from the Abbey of Saint Denis. Construction of the current church began in 1532 and continued until 1632, and in 1637. Some of the architects associated with the church's construction include Pierre Lemercier, his son Nicolas Lemercier, and Nicolas' son-in-law Charles David. The addition of two chapels in 1655 severely compromised the structural integrity of the church, necessitating the demolition of the facade, which was rebuilt in 1754 under the direction of the architect Jean Mansart de Jouy. During the French Revolution, the church was, like most churches in Paris, desecrated and looted. It was closed to Catholic worship in 1793 and used for a time as a barn; it was re-opened in 1795 with significant damage to the building and its furniture. The building was further damaged by a fire in 1844. Architect Victor Baltard directed a complete restoration of the building from 1846-1854, including the construction of the organ case, pulpit, and high altar and the repair of the church's paintings. The church was set afire during the rule of the Paris Commune in 1871, necessitating repairs to the attic, buttresses, and south facade. The facade was revised from 1928-1929. Les Halles became a shopping center and hub for regional transportation, and the Church of St. Eustache remains a landmark of the area and a functioning church. The church is an example of a Gothic structure clothed in Renaissance and classical detail. At the main façade, the left tower has been completed in Renaissance style, while the right tower remains a stump. The front and rear aspects provide a remarkable contrast between the comparatively sober classical front and the exuberant rear, which integrates Gothic forms and organization with Classical details. The whole area around is very vibrant during the evenings and quite quiet and relaxed during the mornings and the afternoons. One of the liveliest neighborhoods in Paris. 

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Esplanade St. Eustache and cafe' La-Pointe with wall paintings:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

We found the Saint Eustache Church interiors to be majestic and very tranquile. Not many tourists visit this charming church. Every Sunday at 5:30, there's a free organ recital (30 minutes). Impressive stained glass windows, paintings and memorials. Very memorable church and visit:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Pope Alexander II:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

The Chapel of the Virgin:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

As a special added attraction the sculpture "L'ecoute" ( The listener by Henri de Miller) is in the plaza next to the church:

Citywalk in , France, visiting things to do in France, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

From Église Saint-Eustache we catch the Metro. Head northeast on Impasse Saint-Eustache toward Rue Montmartre, 40 m. Turn right onto Rue Montmartre, 70 m. Turn right onto Allée André Breton, 130 m. Turn right, 60 m. and you've arrived to Les Halles Metro station.

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