Inns of Court, Fleet Street and Holborn

MAY 07,2013 - MAY 07,2013 (1 DAYS)

United Kingdom

1 DAYS

Citywalk

Inns of Court, Fleet Street, Holborn, Soane's and The Hunterian Museums:

This area of Central London is home to the legal professions. The law is above and inside the Inns of Court, Courts of Justice and many buildings and houses around. Several buildings, like: Middle Temple Hall and Staple Inn - predate even the Great Fire of year 1666. Holborn is a fascinating area, also a hub of the 19th century British legal system. Then and nowadays - lawyers work, eat, study and sleep here - as does the British common law... The Inns of court are open to the public, full with romantic, naive, archaic atmosphere, with charming small gardens.

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Start: Holborn station.

End  : Holborn station.

From Holborn station head south on Kingsway toward Parker St. Turn left onto Remnant St. Turn right onto Lincoln's Inn Fields and the entrance to Lincoln's Inn is on your left. It is on the north side of the Law Courts.  This is the best-preserved of London's Inns of Court. Some buildings go back even to the end of the 15th century.  The bricks of the Inn were laid during the reign of Elizabeth I. Oliver Cromwell was a student living here. It was a playground for the Law students living here, but, also an execution place in Tudor times. Lawyers play tennis here in the summer evenings and it has also become the site for evening suppers for some London's homeless. The Inn is surrounded by a brick wall separating it from the streets. The buildings are used both by barristers and solicitors and other professional bodies. Open: Mon - Fri: 07.00 - 19.00. The Inn's buildings, however, are only open for organised tours, except for the Chapel (which is open Monday to Friday 9.00 to 17.00  - see below). Tours of the Inn, with registered guides, can be arranged through: sema.morris@lincolnsinn.org.uk. Please give at least two weeks notice, preferably longer. Groups will normally comprise a minimum of 15 visitors. The tours, which lasts between 60 minutes and 2 hours, will include, subject to availability, visits to the Old Hall, Great Hall and Chapel. Prices: 5-45 GBP, depending on duration of visit. The tours start in the morning at 10:30 am and in the afternoon at 2:30 pm.

The Great Hall now serves all the normal purposes of a hall in an Inn. During the four dining terms of the year, each 23 days long, it is used for dining, and students of the Inn keep their terms then. In addition, the hall provides lunches for members throughout the year.

The Great Hall exterior:

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The Library is open to all students and barristers of Lincoln's Inn, as well as outside scholars and solicitors by application. It is part of the Great Hall Building (with your face to the building - on the right side).

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Lincoln's Inn of Court Fields:

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Lincoln's Inn of Court Chapel:

The Gothic chapel is from the early years of the 17th century. The current chapel was built between 1620 and 1623 by Inigo Jones, and was extensively rebuilt in 1797 and again in 1883. Open: Mon - Fri: 12.00 - 14.30:

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The Old Hall is the finest building in the Inn and, indeed, is one of the finest buildings in London. It is small but beautifully proportioned and executed. It is very rarely open to the public.

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Exit the Lincoln's Inn fields from the same entrance (the most western one) you've entered (Lincoln's Inn Fields road).

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Here, you can make a detour and visit one or two museums which are adjacent to the Lincoln's Inn premises. Sir John Soan's Museum is at 13 Lincoln's Inn Fields (opposite the north border of LIncoln's Inn) and The Hunterian Museum is in 35-43 Lincoln's Inn Fields (opposite the south border of LIncoln's Inn). From the west exit/entrance of Lincoln's Inn - you have to turn RIGHT to Soan's Museum and turn LEFT to the Hunterian Museum.

In case you want to visit the Sir John Soan's Museum, (and Royal College of Surgeons), 35-43 Lincoln's Inn Fields - turn right and head north on Lincoln's Inn Fields. The museum is opposite the southern part of Lincoln's Inn Fields premises. Otherwise - continue from (1). Opening hours: Tuesday to Saturday 10.00 - 17.00. Last entry 17.30. Closed every Sunday, Monday and bank holiday. Admission is free. The quietest time to visit is when they open at 10.00. The Museum is lit by candlelight on the first Tuesday of each month, from 18.00 until 21.00. This event is extremely popular and many more people arrive. For this reason, at 17.30 the museum issues tickets to the first 200 people who arrive.  Photography, using either a camera, mobile phone or iPad is not permitted in the Museum. Born in 1753, the son of a bricklayer, Sir Soane died in 1837 after a long and distinguished career. He designed 13 Lincoln's Inn Fields as his home and as a setting for his antiquities and works of art. After his wife's death he lived here alone, constantly adding to and rearranging his collections. The house was left by its owner in his will for all people to see. He established the house as a museum by Act of Parliament (1833) requiring that his romantic and poetic interiors be kept as they were at the time of his death. This is something you rarely find. This museum is a great experience. There's so much packed into it. In some places It's dark which makes viewing difficult at times. The picture room with the multiple panels of paintings is quite fantastic. Note: the house might be under refurbishment - but the museum is still open:

File:Soane Museum 1.jpg

File:Soane museum gallery.jpg

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In case you want to visit the The Hunterian Museum and Royal College of Surgeons - turn left along Lincoln's Inn Fields road and The Hunterian Museum and Royal College of Surgeons, 35-43 Lincoln's Inn Fields is opposite the southern part of Lincoln's Inn Fields courts. Otherwise - continue from (1). The Hunterian Museum is open Tuesday to Saturday from 10am to 5pm. Admission is free and the museum is open to all. The Hunterian Museum is located inside The Royal College of Surgeons of England, 35-43 Lincoln's Inn Fields. This is an interesting museum if you are fascinated by anatomy and medical science. I think it should interest every adult. Keep in mind you can fill enjoyable couple of hours spent wandering around a fascinating array of human and animal specimens. True, not for the faint hearted. It is a very weird collection of animals, body parts and even full foetuses hold in jars and on top of that a lot of surgeon history and instruments. You'll learn a lot:

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Two floors of exhibits in the Hunterian Museum:

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A picture of a British gentleman from the 18th century who weighed 335 kg.:

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Sarafix Fixator:

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In case you gave up the Soan's and the Hunteriam Museums detour - continue from here:

(1) Head south on Lincoln's Inn Fields (straight on from the exit you left the Lincoln's Inn) toward Sardinia St. Continue onto Portsmouth St. and at Nos. 11-13 stands the Old Curiosity Shop - believed to be the original for Charles Dickens book of the same name. Probably the oldest shop in London - a 17th century building. It gives a rare impression of London before the Great Fire of 1666:

File:OldCuriosityShop.JPG

Head southeast on Portsmouth St toward Sheffield St. Turn right onto Portugal St. Turn left onto Clare Market. Turn right onto Houghton St. Turn left onto Aldwych. Slight left to stay on Aldwych. The Royal Courts of Justice will be on the left. These are the British main civil courts. Only civil cases are tried: families matters, appeals and liabilities. Criminals are dealt in the Old Bailey. (see later). Closed: public holidays. Open: Mon - Fri: 9.00 - 16.30. Courtrooms are open to the public, but, with stringent security checks. No cameras allowed. The extravagant buildings were completed at 1882 and they contain almost 1000 rooms 5.5 km. of corridors. Try to exit from the south (The Strand) - from the same direction you've entered the complex:

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Opposite the Royal Courts of Justice, on 216 The Strand you find the Twinings Tea Shop And Museum. The shop is narrow and long so that each side from the entrance is racked with different products. You will be astonished to learn of the huge range of items that are available. At the rear of the shop is a relatively small museum charting the history of the firm and it's products. You can spend here easily 20-30 minutes. Sample teas can be tried and greatly add to your experience with tea. A visit is highly recommended. Prepare your wallet:

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You have to walk back one block before (more to west) to see The George on the Strand pub. This place opened first as a coffee house in 1723. Lots of interesting artifacts and pictures. Price range 10 - 16 GBP for a lunch:

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Have a glance at Lloyds TSB Bank PLC, 222 Strand branch - still owning the glorious past atmosphere:

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A few steps later, more eastward along the Strand, outside the Law Courts, stands the Temple Bar Memorial - a monument that dates from 1880 and marks the entrance to the City of London. It is a long-standing tradition for the monarch (The Queen or the King) to stop here and ask the permission of The Lord Mayor to enter the City. The huge archway was designed by Wren:

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Just before the City and Fleets Street start, take the right (south) leg of Fleet Street and 1 minute walk from the Temple Bar Memorial (near the Wildy Legal Bookstore) there is a small alley (on your right) - leading to the Temple Church and Temple Inns of Court. Actually, there are, here TWO inns of court: The Inner Temple (only the grounds are open, Mon - Fri 12.30 - 15.00) and The Middle Temple Hall (open Mon - Fri 10.00 - 11.30 and 15.00 - 16.00. It is closed frequently for formal events). Advancing along this alley - we see, first, on our left the Temple Church (open Wed - Fri hours change frequently. See open hours on the church main door). Entry charge: 4.00 GBP (2.00 senior citizens). Free to 18s and under. The Temple Church was built by the Knights Templar. The Round Church was consecrated in 1185. The Temple Church Choir and the fine  organ can also be heard in concerts, along with two professional ensembles based at the church: The Temple Singers and The Temple Players. Lunchtime Organ Recitals take place on Wednesdays 13.15-13.45. The present organ (currently being restored in Durham) was installed in the church by its builder, Harrison & Harrison Ltd, in 1954.

The name "Temple" derives from the Knights Templar order which protected the pilgrims to the Holy Land. The order was based in this area but its power had been a threat to the British Crown and the knights were forced to leave:

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File:Temple Church, Temple, London EC4.jpeg

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File:Temple Church 01.jpg

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Photo of Queen Elizabeth and her husband (1958) in the Temple Church:

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In the church nave - there are effigies (13th century) of the Knights Templar:

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The column opposite the church indicated the exact place where the Great Fire of 1666 was extinguished.

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The Inner Temple  is the eastern part of the complex and the Middle Temple is the western part. The Temple Church is roughly central to these two inns and is governed by both of them. The Inns each have their own gardens, dining halls, libraries and administrative offices, all located in their part of the Temple. They are separated by the Middle Temple Lane.

File:Middle Temple Lane.jpg

Most of the land is, however, taken up by buildings in which barristers practice from sets of rooms known as chambers. Until the twentieth century, many of the chambers in the Temple were also residential accommodation for barristers. Nowadays, there are very few number of residential limited to the very top floors and to top lawyers only. The whole area suffered much damage due to air bombs in World War II and many of the buildings, especially in the Inner Temple and Middle Temple inns, had to be rebuilt. Temple Church itself was also badly damaged and had to be rebuilt. Rebuilding was completed in 1959, and today the Temple is a flourishing and active Inn of Court, with over 8,000 members.

The Inner Temple sets of chambers are: Crown Office Row, Dr Johnson's Buildings, Farrar's Building, Francis Taylor Building, Harcourt Buildings, Hare Court, King's Bench Walk, Littleton Building, Mitre Court Buildings, Paper Buildings and Temple Gardens. Inner Temple Gardens were laid out around 1601, with a set of decorated railings added in 1618.  The gardens contain various landmarks, including a sundial from 1707, a pair of cisterns dated from 1730 and a lead statute of a blackmoor by John Nost. The gardens were previously noted for their roses, and William Shakespeare claimed that the Wars of the Roses started in the Inner Temple Garden.

File:Inner Temple Garden 2007.jpg

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The Gateway, at the top of Inner Temple Lane on Fleet Street, is thought to have existed in the same location since the founding of the Temples by the Knights Templar. It was rebuilt in 1610 and again rebuilt in 1748. The building above it (which is not owned by the Inn) is reputed to have been the council chambers of Henry Frederick and Charles - Princes of Wales:

File:Cmglee Fleet Street Inner Temple entrance.jpg

Hare Court, within the Inner Temple:

File:Grand Inner Temple.jpg

Middle Temple Hall is at the heart of the Middle Temple Inn, and the Inn's student members are required to attend a minimum of 12 qualifying sessions there - educational elements combined with dinners or receptions with lectures, debates, mooting, or musical performances. Middle Temple Hall is also a popular film location - the cobbled streets, historic buildings and gas lighting give it a unique atmosphere. William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night received its first recorded performance in this place:

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Middle Temple Gardens:

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Middle and Inner Temple Inns of Court from the south (Victoria Embankment direction):

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Exit/Entrance to Middle and Inner Temple Inns of Court from Victoria Embankment:

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We leave the Temple Inns of Courts from the point we entered it and continue walking eastward (right) along Fleet Street. England's first printing press was set up in this street and Fleet Street had been the centre of England publishing industry ever since. In No. 37 stands the C Hoare & Co (private banking company) building which was, in the past, the Old Mitre tavern - patronized by William Shakespeare and Ben Johnson. The house was built 1828-30 and was designed by architect Charles Parker:

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In 1702 was issued the first newspaper from Fleet Street and, during the following centuries, this street  became synonymous with the Press. From the end of the 1980s there were new digital technologies which made it easier to produce papers and the street was abandoned by the Tabloids. Almost all of the newspapers had moved east to Wapping, Canary Wharf and south to Southwark in the 1980s and 1990s. The former offices of The Daily Telegraph, The Daily Express and Reuters are Listed Buildings:

Former Reuters & Press Association Building - 85 Fleet Street (built: 1934-1938):

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The Daily Express Building (120 Fleet Street) is a Grade II* listed building located in Fleet Street in the City of London. It was designed in 1932 by Ellis and Clark to serve as the (past) home of the Daily Express newspaper and is one of the most prominent examples of art-deco architecture in London:

File:Express Building.jpg

Victorian Clock outside the Daily Telegraph Building, 135–41 Fleet Street:

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135–41 Fleet Street, the former Daily Telegraph Building:

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A short detour. On your left, Chancery Lane. Its length 0.5 km and it connects Fleet Street at its southern origin with High Holborn. Historically, the street was associated with the legal profession, an association which continues to the present day; however, consulting firms, ancillary businesses and the Maughan Library also occupy the street. Lincoln's Inn occupies most of the western side of the lane north of Carey Street. I recommend you'll explore this street and walk back to Fleet Street. The Maughan Library and its clock tower is situated on the eastern side of Chancery Lane, opposite the Law Society:

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File:Maughanclocktower.JPG

Several steps later, on Fleet Street, on your left, stands St Dunstan-in-the-Westmore church, 186a Fleet Street. An octagonal-shaped building, it is dedicated to a former Bishop of London and Archbishop of Canterbury. Open Monday-Friday, 09.30 - 17.00. St Dunstan's dates back to the 10th century; it survived the Great Fire of London:

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File:St Dunstans In The West Interior.jpg

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St Dunstan Church clock from 1671. Gog and Magog ringing the bell:

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View from Fleet Street to Ludgate Circus and St. Paul Cathedral:

File:Londres - Fleet Street.JPG

Further along Fleet Street, on your right (a bit off Fleet Street) is St. Bride Church or the Press Church. OPen: Mon - Fri  08.00 -18.30, Sun 10.00 - 13.00, 17.00 - 19.30. Closed: public holidays. One of Wren's best-loved churches. Popular venue for memorial services of departed journalists. World reputed octagonal spire- built in 1703.

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The underneath crypt contains Roman pavement:

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... and fantastic exhibition on WW2 history of the City of London:

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Continue along Fleet Street and cross Fetter lane. Pass Crane Ct and Red Lion Ct, on your left. On the third alley, to your left - turn left onto Johnson's Ct and zig-zag in this alley until you arrive to Dr. Johnson's House -  a former home of the 18th-century English writer and lexicographer Samuel Johnson. Built in 1700 by wool merchant Richard Gough. it is a rare example of a house of its era which survives in the City of London. There are many other houses of this period elsewhere in Greater London, but this is the only one in the City  and the only one of Johnson's 18 residences in the City to survive. It is located at No. 17, Gough Square, a small L-shaped court. Johnson lived and worked in the house from 1748 to 1759, and, there, he compiled his famous A Dictionary of the English Language:

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File:Dr. Johnson's House.jpg

Hodge - The Cat of Dr. Johnson in Gough Square. It is written there:
"When a Man is Tired of London' he is tired of life. For there is London all that life can afford...".

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Offices Buildings in Gough Square:

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Vertical Gardening in these buildings - Gough Square:

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Head south on Gough Square, turn right toward Bolt Ct, turn right onto Bolt Ct, turn left to stay on Bolt Ct. The Starbucks Cofee is on your left and (above the average) McDonald restaurant on your right. Turn LEFT onto Fleet Street.Our next destination is Holborn. So, you can continue along Fleet Street and TURN LEFT ONTO Shoe Ln. Head north on Shoe Ln toward Wine Office Ct. Turn right to stay on Shoe Ln. Turn left onto Shoe Ln. Slight right to stay on Shoe Ln. On your right the Garden of St Andrew's Holborn Church (5 St. Andrews Street):

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Turn right toward Holborn Viaduct and turn left onto Holborn Viaduct (its northern leg). Walk in Holborn Viaduct (westward) until Waterhouse Square. Skip to (2).

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In case you want to see Ludgate Circus and/or the Old Bailey - follow this detour instructions:

Continue eastward along Fleet Street and 5 minutes walk further - you are in Ludgate Circus (in the background: St. Paul Cathedral). Here, in this bustling junction, starts Ludgate Hill which rises up to St. Paul's Cathedral (more to the east):

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St. Martin Ludgate Church + St. Paul Cathedral:

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Detour to the Old Bailey:  Head east on Ludgate Hill toward Farringdon St. Slight right to stay on Ludgate Hill. Turn left onto Old Bailey and the famous court is on your left. The Central Criminal Court deals with major criminal cases from Greater London and, in exceptional cases, from other parts of England and Wales. Trials at the Old Bailey, as at other courts, are open to the public, albeit subject to stringent security procedures. Part of the present building stands on the site of the medieval road which follows the line of London's fortified wall (or bailey), which runs from Ludgate Hill to the junction of Newgate Street and Holborn Viaduct. The public galleries are open for viewing of trials in session.No admission for children under 14. No cameras, video equipment, mobile phones, bags, food or drink allowed in the building. There are no facilities for the safekeeping of such items available at the entrance to the public galleries. You leave your valuables at the estate agents across the road for £1 per item as all electronic devices are prohibited in the court. Just to the right of Hoborn Viaduct, two or three shops down, it is the Scott’s sales and letting office. At Scott’s, you will be charged £1.00p for every item that you leave and they will issue you with a ticket, that you present on your return. Then walk back down to the Old Bailey and once past the famous arches, turn left into Warwick Passageway, where you queue for the Public Gallery. As we said the doors do not open until 10.00. They give you bags to deposit any food or drink, which is also not allowed within the building. Then, through detectors and checks. At last, you are free to visit courts 1 - 12, if they are in session. Be sure to engage with Court Clerks, as they will be paramount in helping you spend your time wisely (not always polite and patient). They will advise on what stage the cases are at, what is expected that day and how extreme or sensitive some cases may be, dependant upon your own personality.

Opening Times: The public galleries are open Monday - Friday 10.00 to 13.00 and 14.00 - 17.00. Visitors must be over 14. Proof of age may be requested by security. Note: you are never admitted before 10.00 and the whole security process will consume significant time. Children or youngsters, sometimes, are not allowed to enter murder trials:

File:Oldbaileylondon-900.jpg

File:Old Bailey entrance.JPG

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After visiting the Old bailey - continue along Old Bailey road northward until its end and turn LEFT to Holborn Viaduct (Newgate Street on your right). Walk until Holborn Viaduct end and continue in the same direction (north-west) when it changes to Holborn. Continue in Holborn (the northern leg) westward until Waterhouse Square.

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(2) We are now in Waterhouse Squre. Waterhouse Square is a large Gothic building of red brick at 138-142 Holborn in the London, owned by Prupim, part of the Prudential group. Do not miss the spectacular courtyard in Prudential building known for its architecture (preservation prize of year 1993). Waterhouse Square is part of the historic Alfred Waterhouse Holborn Bars Prudential offices development on High Holborn. The scheme was substantially redeveloped in 1991 to provide modern office accommodation and is comprehensively refurbished. Originally, the Holborn Bars building was built 1879–1901:

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Behind the Prudential Building lies the Anglo-Catholic church of St Alban the Martyr. Originally built in 1863 by architect William Butterfield it was gutted during the Blitz but later reconstructed, retaining Butterfield's west front. It is a building of two lives, as the exterior is a classic Victorian Anglo Catholicism design, the interior is actually a very modern minimalist design:

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Opposite the Prudential Building, a bit to the right (east) you see the Staple Inn. A Tudor building that has been used by actuaries since 1887 when the Institute of Actuaries was first based here. Over its history it has been as an Inn of Chancery for younger members of the legal profession and then a principal office for the Actuarial Profession, and continues to be a meeting venue for actuaries. Many actuaries around the world consider it their "home". This half timbered Inn gives an impression of High Holborn before the great fire and redevelopment in seventeenth century when it would have been lined with many similar buildings. The house is not open to the public, although you can have a look around the courtyard:
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2stapleinn2009

Walk BACK in High Holborn (eastward) toward Leather Ln. Turn left onto Leather Ln. Turn right onto Greville St. Turn left onto Hatton Garden. Hatton Garden, the centre of the diamond trade, was leased to a favourite of Queen Elizabeth I, Sir Christopher Hatton at the insistence of the Queen to provide him with an income. It is most famous for being London’s jewellery quarter and centre of the UK diamond trade, but the area is also now home to a diverse range of media and creative businesses. Over 50 shops represent the largest cluster of jewellery retailers in the UK. The largest of these companies is De Beers, the international family of companies that dominate the international diamond trade. De Beers has its headquarters in a complex of offices and warehouses just behind the main Hatton Garden shopping street. Appreciate the fine stone carvings of Treasure House at numbers 19-21. Then, look out for the narrow alley of Mitre Court where the Mitre Tavern was first built by the Bishop of Ely in 1546 for his servants. The latter is still contains a piece of the cherry tree around which Elizabeth 1 was said to have danced the maypole.

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File:Hatton.garden.london.arp.jpg

Our last destination is the Gray's Inn Garden the last Inn Court for today. It is 10 minutes walk from the north end of Hatton Garden to the Gary's Inn Gardens. Turn left to Greville Street. Turn right to Leather Ln. Turn left to Baldwin's Gardens. Cross Gray's Inn Road and continue along Gray's Inn Square.The Gray's Inn Square is on your right:

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Turn right toward Jockey's Fields. Turn right at Warwick Ct and Sharp left onto Jockey's Fields. Gray's Inn, is one of the four Inns of Court (professional associations for barristers and judges) in London. Only the grounds are open - Mon - Fri 12.00 - 14.30. The buildings may be visited only by prior arrangement. This ancient legal centre goes back to the 14th century. It was badly damaged in WW2 but much of it has been rebuilt. A Comedy of Errors by Shakespeare was first performed in Gray's Inn Hall in 1594. Charles Dickens was employed here in 1827-8:

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

It is 5 minutes walk to the tube station. We trace back. Head north on Jockey's Fields. Sharp right onto Warwick Ct. Turn left onto High Holborn and walk 2 minutes to Chancery Lane tube station.

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