Chichester

JUN 22,2016 - JUN 22,2016 (1 DAYS)

United Kingdom

1 DAYS

Citywalk

Chichester:

Main Attractions: Chichester Cathedral, Chichester Cross, Ox Market Centre of Arts, The Butter Market, Chichester Canal Basin, Chichester Canal, Chichester Walls, Priory Park, Bishop's Palace Gardens.

Start & End: Chichester Station.

Weather: I did this short route in a rainy day. Duration: 3/4 day. Distance: 10-11 km.

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Introduction: One of the great well-preserved Georgian cities in the UK, Chichester has played a key role of the affairs of Sussex since at least Roman times. Today, Chichester is the prosperous administrative capital of West Sussex and a great place for shopping, but it's hard to avoid Chichester's links to its illustrious past. Chichester city centre's broad streets are packed with listed buildings, headed by the Chichester Cathedral, now home to a family of peregrine falcons who can be heard as they swoop over the city at dusk. The pedestrianised city centre is neatly enclosed within the ancient city walls and this helps to make Chichester compact and pleasant to explore on foot. There are plenty of good shops in Chichester and the city serves as the main shopping centre for an extensive hinterland which stretches right up towards the north of West Sussex. Chichester lies between two areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty - the South Downs and Chichester Harbour - as well as other nature reserves, stunning beaches and dramatic coastline to the south.

Our Chichester Itinerary:

It is about half a mile from the station to the Cathedral and will take an average of 10 minutes to walk the route. From the station we head east on Station Approach toward Stockbridge Rd, which, quickly, changes to Southgate Rd. Turn left and slight left along Stockbridge Rd/ Southgate for 150 m. Continue onto South St for 160 m. From the distance we see the ancient Cross. Turn left onto Canon Ln and (under two arches and a brown sign "Cathedral Entrance"). walk along this narrow lane for 125 m. You see the Cathedral on your right:

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For 900 years Chichester Cathedral has stood at the heart of Chichester. Its architecture has spanning the centuries; ranging from original Norman features to the magnificent Victorian Spire. The Cathedral is especially famous for its art, both ancient and modern, with medieval carvings alongside world famous 20th Century artworks !

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Opposite the cathedral entrance stands a larger than life-size statue of a cloaked St. Richard (by Philip Jackson) standing on a cubular plinth. The left hand is holding a scourge, a symbol of self-discipline and the outstretched right arm is extending through the opening of the cloak. The right hand depicts the sign of a blessing. St. Richard was the first Bishop of Chichester. On his death, his heart was buried in Dover and his body taken back to Chichester. Three years later he was canonized on 22 January 1262. On 16 June 1276, in the presence of King Edward I, Queen Eleanor, the Archbishop of Canterbury and other bishops, and a great crowd of people, his body was moved to the shrine behind the high altar (see below) where it became a place of pilgrimage and prayer for the people of Sussex:

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The Cathedral is open every day and all year with free entry. The glorious architecture, art, memorials and other treasures here deserve, at least, two hours of one's time. Free guided tours take place Monday to Saturday at 11.15 and 14.30. Many  events like exhibitions, talks, lunchtime and evening concerts, and a superb Cloisters Café and Shop. The Cathedral is in great condition and its grounds and interiors are well maintained. This is a beautifully restored building which is a pleasure to visit. Very splendid and enjoyable place to visit. Lovely, quiet atmosphere with plenty of history. The cathedral volunteers who are greeting you on entering the Cathedral are friendly, welcoming and helpful. They are so knowledgeable and make your visit a wonderful experience. The Chichester Cathedral is a bit different than other churches around Europe and the UK: The exhibits inside are a bit odd for a church a mix of haunting sculptures, even the alter piece is very modern. It is also unusual that such an attraction is free of charge. Being a bit more modern the church offers, as well, concerts, talks and educational events. If you are lucky - you can sample the Cathedral when the choir is practicing. An heavenly music which sends shivers down your spine... It isn't one of the largest, best known or most visited of medieval cathedrals. It is smaller than the Canterbury or York cathedrals. Chichester is also small for a Norman cathedral when compared to Winchester, Ely and Peterborough cathedrals. Open: every day from 7.15 - 18.30 (MON- SAT) and from 7.15 - 17.00 (SUN). Photography and filming can take place in the Cathedral. Chichester Cathedral was founded as a cathedral in 1075, when the seat of the bishop was moved from Selsey. The Cathedral has architecture in both the Norman and the Gothic styles. It has two architectural features that are unique among England's medieval cathedrals - a free-standing medieval bell tower (or campanile) and double aisles:

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20. Entrance & Donations to Cathedral. 1. The Baptistry. 2. The Chapel of
St George.  3. The Chapel of St Clement. 4. The Arundel Screen. 5. The South Transept. 6. Romanesque Sculptures. 7. Piper Tapestry. 9. Site of the Shrine of St Richard.  11. Christ in Judgement. 8. Graham Sutherland Painting. 10. Lady Chapel. 12. Chapel of St John the Baptist. 13. The Marc Chagall Window. 14. The Treasury. 15. The North Transept. 16. Gustav Holst Memorial. 17. Arundel Tomb. 18. Visitors’ Exhibition. 19. The Chapel of St Michael. 21. Cloisters,  Café and Shop.

The Cathedral is 123m in length and 48m in width, its spire is 84.5m in height:

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The Cathedral History: Chichester cathedral's roots lie way back in 681, when Saint Wilfred came charging into Sussex to spread the word about Christianity, establishing a Cathedral in the small community of Selsey, south of Chichester. After the Norman invasion of 1066, it was decreed that cathedrals should be shunted from small communities into the big centres of population, resulting in construction of the current cathedral, starting in 1076. Built in the heart of the former Roman town, the cathedral was completed in 1108, only to suffer a major fire in 1114. Despite being restored and extended westwards by Bishop Luffa, another hefty fire in 1187 completely destroyed the timber roof and caused major damage to the arcade stonework. New naves added during the thirteenth century made Chichester one of the widest English cathedrals, with a fourteenth century extension of the Lady Chapel showing off windows in the 'decorated' style. Bishop John Langton rocked up 1315 and rebuilt the south wall of the south transept, while fifteenth century additions saw the building of cloisters enclosing the south transept, the detached bell-tower - the only one of its kind left in England - and a much-admired spire. The cathedral suffered a right trashing during the Reformation, with brasses removed from memorials, stone figures and carvings defaced and the shrine of St Richard totally destroyed. After years of neglect, Dean George Chandler set about restoring the Cathedral in the 1840s, with his successor, Dean Walter Farquar Hook commissioning a replacement spire (by Sir George Gilbert Scott) after the original collapsed in 1861.

First, we head to the cloisters. The café is situated within the centre of the cathedral cloister (on your left, as you enter) and boasts a beautiful private garden, allowing customers to enjoy a magnificent view of the cathedral. There is also a stunning view of the Cathedral spire from inside through the glass roof. Open: MON - SAT: 09.00 - 17.00, SUN: 10.00 -- 16.00. Accessible toilets are available in the Cloisters Café:

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View of the Cathedral from the Cloister and its Cafe':

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The Baptistry sits under the south-west tower of the Cathedral and is home to the wonderful copper font which is used for baptism. Commissioned by the Dean and Chapter the font is the work of John Skelton:

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St. George Chapel: Saint George is the patron saint of England and on the panel behind the chapel’s altar he is depicted as a knight in armour slaying a dragon. This is a myth. George was a soldier in the Roman army. He converted to christianity and was executed in Nicomedia in modern day Turkey on 23 April 303 AD. The chapel was restored in 1921 as a memorial chapel for the Royal Sussex Regiment. The names of about 8000 soldiers who fell in World War I are inscribed in the encased panels. A further 1,024 names from the Second World War are recorded in the Book of Remembrance by the altar:

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St. George Chapel - stained Glass:

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St. Clement Chapel: Pope Clement I, also known as St. Clement of Rome, was the third pope. He was martyred in about 98. The precise date of the chapel’s construction is unknown:

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The nave was later divided from the choir by an elegant perpendicular screen with three arched openings, called the Arundel Screen, which was removed in the mid 19th century but reinstated in 1961:

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Do not miss the huge Lambert Barnard paintings in the South Transept. Lambert Barnard (1485 - 1567) was an early Tudor painter who created Chichester Cathedral's extraordinary and unique Tudor paintings. Believed to be the largest surviving paintings of their kind, these two huge painted panels are on display in the south transept of the Cathedral. The paintings are a sophisticated piece of political theatre and propaganda, giving us a rare opportunity to imagine how Henry VIII was seen by his ordinary subjects. The paintings, of national importance, are now badly in need of stabilisation and restoration and an appeal has been launched to raise funds - £250,00 - for this important work. They are under restoration from year 2016:

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South Transept's stained glasses:

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In the south transept stands the Antiphoner into a window room. This liturgical service book, one of the largest in the world, was given to the Cathedral by R.J. Campbell (Chancellor 1930-46). Its origin is not known. It is probably from the 15th century. A similar manuscript is in the British Library and a fine illuminated example is in Mexico City. The five-line plainsong stave and the style of decoration suggest a Spanish or South American origin. The book begins with the Te Deum, followed by the antiphons, psalms and hymns for the office of Lauds throughout the year. Its size would enable it to be read by a number of singers at a distance. The initial illuminated page portrays St Francis and St Dominic. The book evidently belonged to an order of Dominican friars, the dedication of whose church (like that of Chichester Cathedral) seems to have been the Holy Trinity. The antiphoner was restored and rebound in Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

The dating of the two Romanesque reliefs at Chichester representing the Raising of Lazarus -

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and Christ in the House of Martha and Mary -

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depends on whether they considered post-Norman-conquest works, or typically Saxon. The approximate date of 1080, suggested by some English historians, has the merit of taking into account the Saxon as well as the French elements in this Norman work. On the other hand, several authorities believe the panels to have been executed as late as the 12th century, while yet others place them as early as the middle Saxon period.

The organ at Chichester Cathedral contains pipework by many famous English builders, including Renatus Harris, George Pike England and the Hill family:

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The Shrine of St Richard, Chichester's local own Saint and a Bishop in the 13th century, was one of the most important for pilgrims to visit in the two following centuries at the height of the medieval period. It was said to be the most popular after the Shrine of St Thomas a Becket in Canterbury and Our Lady in Walsingham. In modern times people still come to the shrine area to pray and light candles. It was decided in 2011 to give more appropriate form to the area, using the backcloth of the Anglo-German Tapestry, which illustrates some of the miracles associated with Richard the saint. The tapestry is complemented by new candle stands and other items made in cast aluminium and designed by Jonathan Clarke. The beautiful Anglo-German tapestry, designed by Ursula Benker-Schirmer took three and a half years from conception to completion and is made using pure linen, silk and cotton. It was designed to harmonise with the architecture and colours of nearby windows in the Cathedral. The centre panel was woven in Germany and the two side panels at West Dean College, near Chichester. Benker-Schirmer assembled the forms as if they were rock crystal fragments. The tapestry was dedicated on 15th June 1985.

Basck side of the tapestry:

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Front side of the tapestry:

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The statue of Christ in Judgement (1968), by sculptor Philip Jackson, is positioned in the Retrochoir above the entrance to the Lady Chapel. The subject of the statue is the final judgement of the world by Jesus. The figure of Christ, clad in his windblown burial shrouds, leans forward from a simple throne. With his right hand he blesses and draws the gentle and good to himself and with his left hand he holds aloft a sword. Christ's hands and feet are marked with the wounds of the cross, and suspended above his head is a crown of thorns:

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At the far eastern side of the cathedral there is a Graham Sutherland (1903 – 1980) painting of Jesus’ plea of ‘Noli Me Tangere’ (literally translated as ‘don’t touch me’). Jesus’ figure hangs upon this construction, his body creating a strong diagonal line pointing upwards but his gaze and gentle, yet firm, gesture downward emphasises the tension between the two figures. The form of Jesus’ raised arm is reminiscent of Michelangelo’s The Creation of Adam: through the most delicate part of the human body, Christ is shown to reconnect us to God:

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The Lady chapel, constructed to the east of the retro-choir, is a long narrow space, with large windows in the Decorated Gothic style of the late 13th century. In the 13th century, the central tower of the cathedral was completed, the Norman apsidal eastern end rebuilt with a Lady chapel and a row of chapels added on each side of the nave, forming double aisles such as are found on many French cathedrals. So, the eastern end of the building is long by comparison with the nave, is square ended and has a projecting Lady chapel:

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The chapel of St. John the Baptist projects eastward from the north aisle and flanks the westernmost bay of the Lady Chapel. Note the decoration (painting of the baptism of Christ) placed above the altar (reredos) in the St. John the Baptist Chapel, which includes religious images. The reredos was made by Patrick Procktor.

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The Marc Chagall Window, 1978 is tucked away in the north-east corner of the cathedral and cannot be seen during regular worship. WOW. Marc Chagall drew his inspiration from Jewish religious life, and especially the mystical' legendary Hassidic tradition that flourished in his home town of Vitebsk. His most famous stained glasses are in the  synagogue of the Hadassah hospital in Jerusalem. The hospital windows and the Cathedral window are the only glass by Chagall which are predominantly red; his preferred colour was blue. To see this window lit by the incoming sun is an unforgettable experience. The window is inspired by Psalm 150, which urges its readers to 'let everything that hath breath praise the Lord':

Praise the LORD.
Praise God in his sanctuary;
praise him in his mighty heavens.
Praise him for his acts of power;
praise him for his surpassing greatness.
Praise him with the sounding of trumpet,
praise him with the harp and lyre,
praise him with tambourine and dancing,
praise him with the strings and flute,
praise him with the clash of cymbals,
praise him with resounding cymbals.

Let everything that has breath praise the LORD.

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The "new" Treasury of Chichester Cathedral is, actually the formerly  Chapel of the Four Virgins (Saints Catherine, Agatha, Margaret and Winifred). In 1976 the vault of the Early English style Chapel of the Four Virgins was secured and the space converted by Stefan Buzas and Alan Irvine into the Treasury in order to display the Cathedral and diocesan church plate:

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The Arundel Tomb in the north aisle of Chichester Cathedral was brought from Lewes Priory after its dissolution in 1537. It is a tomb chest and on top lays the recumbent figures of Richard Fitzalan, earl of Arundel, and his second wife, Eleanor of Lancaster. We now see a double tomb, Richard dressed in the armour of a knight of the period and Eleanor in a gown, veil and wimple. The tomb is best known today through Philip Larkin’s 1955 poem,’ An Arundel Tomb’. The final line is much quoted: ‘What will survive of us is love’:

Side by side, their faces blurred,
The earl and countess lie in stone,
Their proper habits vaguely shown
As jointed armour, stiffened pleat,
And that faint hint of the absurd–
The little dogs under their feet.

Such plainess of the pre-baroque
Hardly involves the eye, until
It meets his left hand gauntlet, still
Clasped empty in the other; and
One sees, with sharp tender shock,
His hand withdrawn, holding her hand.

They would not think to lie so long.
Such faithfulness in effigy
Was just a detail friends could see:
A sculptor’s sweet comissioned grace
Thrown off in helping to prolong
The Latin names around the base.

They would not guess how early in
Their supine stationary voyage
Their air would change to soundless damage,
Turn the old tenantry away;
How soon succeeding eyes begin
To look, not read. Rigidly they

Persisted, linked, through lengths and breadths
Of time. Snow fell, undated. Light
Each summer thronged the grass. A bright
Litter of birdcalls strewed the same
Bone-riddled ground. And up the paths
The endless altered people came,

Washing at their identity.
Now, helpless in the hollow of
An unarmorial age, a trough
Of smoke in slow suspended skeins
Above their scrap of history,
Only an attitude remains:

Time has transfigured them into
Untruth. The stone finality
They hardly meant has come to be
Their final blazon, and to prove
Our almost-instinct almost true:
What will survive of us is love.

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Gustav Holst Memorial in the North Transept: Gustav Holst (21 September 1874 – 25 May 1934) was an English composer, arranger and teacher:

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We exit the catedral with our face to the bells tower and turn right to West St.

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On our left is the Duke & Rye pub. After walking 150 m. eastward along West Street - we arrive to the Chichester Cross. Roman Chichester was built on a grid pattern. The main streets formed a cross, which remains today as North, South, East and West Streets. In the center of the town was the forum, a marketplace lined with shops and public buildings. People in Roman Chichester used cesspits and obtained their water from wells but in the streets there were drains for rainwater. Chichester Cross is an perpendicular market cross in the centre of the city of Chichester,  standing at the intersection of the four principal streets (North, West, South and East streets). According to the inscription upon it, this cross was built by Edward Story, Bishop of Chichester from 1477 to 1503; but little is known for certain and the style and ornaments of the building suggest that it may date from the reign of Edward IV. In 1501 Bishop Storey erected Chichester market cross. It was built to provide a covered marketplace from which Chichester's traders could sell their wares, and as a meeting point - mainly for the poor people. An earlier wooden cross had been erected on the same site by Bishop Rede (1369-1385). The stone cross was repaired during the reign of Charles II, and at the expense of the Duke of Richmond, in 1746 and stands to this day. Until 1746 the clock on the cross was square. It was then replaced by four new clocks. Until the pedestrianisation of Chichester city centre the streets around the Cross used to be a busy highway with the main coastal road edging around the narrow gap between the Market Cross and the city centre shops. Nowadays, apart from a few buses, the centre of Chichester is more or less traffic free:

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I've been in Chichester during the last day before the United Kingdom European Union membership referendum, 2016:

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From the market cross head east along East Street toward Little London, 160 m. Turn left onto Little London, turn left to stay on Little London and, again, turn left to arrive to the Ox Market Centre of Arts. A calm, pleasant, sophisticated gallery, located in an old medieval church, with display areas of exhibits ranging from local groups to specified professional artists. Worth a visit of 20-30 minutes:
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From the Ox Market Gallery head east toward Little London. Turn right onto Little London, turn right to stay on Little London. Turn left onto East St. Turn right onto Baffin's Ln. Turn right onto E Pallant, 160 m. Turn right onto N Pallant. You pass, on your right, the Pallant House Gallery & Bookshop, 9 North Pallant: an eclectic, independent art bookshop housed in a handsome Queen Anne house and a modern extension, working alongside Pallant House Gallery and offering new, remaindered and out of print books on Modern British Art. Inside, you find a wonderful small gallery.  You will find a treasure trove of paintings, sculptures, prints, drawings, and a constantly changing programme of art exhibitions. BUT, the admission price is quite hefty. A visit is strongly recommended. Open: TUE-SAT: 10.00 – 17.00, THU: 10.00 – 20.00, SUN/Bank Holidays: 11.00 – 17.00. Mondays: Closed. Prices: Adults: £10, Children (Up to 16 yrs) Free, Students (with NUS card) Free, Students (with University ID card) £5:
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Head south on North Pallant, 160 m. Turn right onto Theatre Ln, turn left onto South St. In this intersection - you find the The Fat Fig Restaurant, 42 South Street (see Tip below).

Head back north on South St toward Theatre Ln, 320 m. Turn right, turn left and 320 m. further - you see, on your ledt, at 22-23 North Street, The Butter Market. The Market House (Butter Market) in North Street was built in 1808 by John Nash to provide accommodation for small traders who had previously traded at the Market Cross. From that year it was illegal to sell any fresh food except in the Butter Market. A second storey was added in 1900 to provide a technical institute and art school, and at one time housed Chichester Art School. It is now an arcade of shops:

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We trace our steps back and change direction - heading to Chichester Canal. Head south along North Street, 320 m. Pass the Cross. Turn right toward South St, turn left onto South St for 320 m. Continue onto Southgate Street for another 320 m. A brown sign pointing "Chichester canal". Turn left onto Canal Wharf, turn right and you see the Richmond Pub, 9 Stockbridge Road on your right. We are in Chichester Canal Basin. A beautiful, accessible retreat close to the city, sometimes described as the “green lung” of Chichester. The Chichester Canal is a navigable canal in England. It runs 4.5 miles (7.2 km) from the sea at Birdham on Chichester Harbour to Chichester through two locks. Chichester Canal is a Site of Nature Conservation Importance (SNCI). What is known today as the Chichester Canal is in fact part of the former Portsmouth & Arundel Canal. This was opened in 1823 and consisted of a 12-mile canal from Ford on the River Arun to Salterns and a shorter cut from Langstone Harbour to Portsmouth Harbour, connected together by a 13-mile ‘bargeway’ through the natural harbours and channels between them. A 1.5 mile branch led from Hunston on the main line of the canal to a basin in Chichester. This and the short connecting length of the main line from Salterns to Hunston were built to a larger gauge and equipped with iron swingbridges to enable coastal ships of over 100 tons to reach Chichester. This was the only part of the canal that enjoyed even a modest success, bringing in building materials and coal, and taking away manure. It carried trade until 1906, while the rest of the canal had been unused since the 1840s and fallen derelict soon after. Transferred to the City Council in 1892 (who in turn sold it to West Sussex County Council in 1957), the surviving four miles were abandoned in 1928. The entrance lock and a short length at Salterns were retained as yacht moorings prior to the building of Chichester Marina alongside; the lock is still capable of operation and a number of houseboats are moored on this length. The remainder of the route to Chichester was leased to the local angling club and gradually silted up over the following half-century. Two main road bridges were replaced by unnavigable culverts. In the late 1970s the Portsmouth & Arundel Canal Society was formed with the aim of restoring the canal. They changed their name to Chichester Canal Society (and more recently to Chichester Ship Canal Trust) to reflect this. Along the years of volunteering work - it was, at last, in year 2002, getting beyond the capabilities of the volunteers (mainly, due to the presence of water voles). The canal centre is closed until the 1st of February 2017. You can still book boat trips (1 and a half hours trip) online: boxoffice@chichestercanal.com. There are, presently, two boats which ply the two mile section of the canal between the Basin and Donnington; a beautiful stretch with excellent views and prolific wildlife. Both boats can accommodate disabled passengers. We'll make part of this section on foot. The whole Chichester Ship Canal passes through 4 miles of open farmland from the Basin to Chichester Harbour at Birdham. Since its abandonment in 1906 it has been relatively undisturbed and has acquired a rich wildlife associated with its mosaic of open water, marginal vegetation, banks and bordering hedgerows. The towpath is part of the Lipchis Way. Cycling is permitted. The path connects with the Bill Way at Hunston and Salterns Way at Birdham, which are long-distance cycle routes to the sea. There are (non-manned) information boards along the canal and also historical remains of the original navigation, including Poyntz Bridge (see below) near the basin and the Selsey tramway abutment at Hunston. There are also several benches along the towpath to sit and appreciate the peace and quiet of the canal and to watch the wildlife. The canal forms an important aquatic and terrestrial wildlife corridor. It links areas of semi-natural habitat between Chichester Harbour and local gravel pits. One of the most beautiful views on the canal is from Hunston Bridge towards Chichester. This view of the canal against a backdrop of the Cathedral and the Downs was painted by JMW Turner in 1828 as 'Chichester Canal' painting. You can get refreshments at each end of towpath from the Canal Centre at the Basin or the Boathouse at the Marina. Or take a break half way at the Blacksmiths Arms at Donnington or the Spotted Cow at Hunston. The whole route towpath is well signed and there are maps available. We'll make only short off-road section on foot. Even if it is raining - you can walk along the towpath. It does not become muddy. The views along the way are stunning. It's all on the flat so suitable for all ages.

Southgate basin at the Chichester end is a BEAUTIFUL spot. It is dotted with butterflies sculptures. You'll see more sculptures along the canal:

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Now we walk along the Chichester Canal. Spectacular views of Chichester and the surrounding areas:

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180 m. further south of the Canal Basin - we meet the Poyntz Bridge: a single span 1820 cast iron swing bridge, It was named after WS Poyntz of Cowdray who was a prominent shareholder in the canal company:

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If you look backward - you see the mighty Chichester Cathedral spire:

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More pictures of the canal towpath:

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After approx. 800 m. from the canal basin - yo see wooden stairs on your right -

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leading to Chichester Bypass, and, later (westward) to the Stockbridge Roundabout. From the roundabout continue along Stockbridge road to the NORTH (with your back to the canal - to the RIGHT). 500 m. north from the roundabout - you see, on your left the Stockbridge Students Village, the Nando's restaurant and the whole Chichester Gate Leisure Park (Cineworld Multiplex cinema - ten screens, Lakeside Superbowl Ten pin bowling leisure complex, The Live Lounge - Chichester's largest live music and entertainment venue, KFC Drive, Domino's Pizza, Frankie & Benny's New York - Italian Restaurant and Bar, The Gatehouse Lloyds No.1 Bar - Wetherspoon, McDonald's Eat in and drive thru' burger restaurant, Fortune Inn - All you can eat for a fixed price, Premier Travel Inn Hotel, Nuffield Health - Chichester's premier health and fitness club,
Nando's Restaurant, Mucho Burrito. The Stockbridge Street continues northward as Southgate, and, later, as South Street.In case, you want to give up the walls - turn left (west) onto Cannon Ln and walk along this lane until its end in the Bishop's Palace Gardens).

Continue walking northward along South street. Pass, again, the Chichester Cross, continue along the North Street. Walk 500 m. along North Street (Chichester Library is on your left) until you meet the North Walls Road on your left. Turn left onto the N Walls road. On your left you see the Chichester Cathedral spires. On your right are the Chichester Walls. The historic City of Chichester dates from Roman times. The Roman walls and streets define the shape of the town. They date back to the third century AD. Today the Walls we see are medieval but built on the Roman foundations. They still can be walked after nearly two thousand years. It is 1800 years since the walls and gates were first built around the Roman town of Noviomagus Reginorum. There were 3 reasons for building the walls around Chichester: they were to defend the town and control trade but their principle purpose was to demonstrate status. Today they are the most intact circuit of Roman town defences in Southern England. More than 80% of the original structure has withstood the test of time. The wall of Chichester is one of those places that make us travel back in time, the old structure contrasts with the everyday life of the city. The walk around sections of the wall is very nice and interesting, in the late afternoon the view is even more beautiful, yielding beautiful pictures. Different views of Chichester may be attained with some great sunsets:

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

On your left is the extensive Priory Park. Inside you can explore sections of the Roman walls. Great playing area for kids plus a great cafe. In the summer there is cricket being played here.

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

The N Walls road slights left, but, before it slights - turn left onto Tower St, 160 m., turn left toward St Richard's Walk, take the stairs, turn right onto St Richard's Walk (the Cathedral is on our left), turn right onto Canon Ln (we've been here in the start of our daily route). Continuing westward along Cannon Ln - we see opposite us the walled Bishop's Palace Gardens. This is the best place to end your day of walk. A wonderful surprise and well worth a visit. Beautifully tended, lots of flower types, many benches available and some pretty water features. Free to visit. A place of peace and tranquility with wonderful views of the Cathedral:

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

From the Bishop's Palace Garden, 4 Canon Lane - we head back east on Canon Ln toward St Richard's Walk, 160 m. Turn right onto South St, 160 m. Continue onto Southgate for 160 m. Turn right onto Station Approach
and  Chichester Station will be on the left.

Food

The Fat Fig Restaurant, 42 South Street:

7.95 GBP for Pan Fried Salmon + spinach + fried potatoes. Delicious. clean, polite, prompt and attentive service. The cuisine is more tended to a Mediterranean twist. Prices were reasonable and atmosphere is relaxed. Great for a chilled out lunch or breakfast or SAT/SUN brunch.

Food in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Food in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

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