Cambridge

MAY 05,2017 - MAY 05,2017 (1 DAYS)

United Kingdom

1 DAYS

Citywalk

Cambridge:

Main Attractions: Cambridge University Botanic Garden, , Fitzwilliam Museum, Corpus Christi College, Corpus Clock, King's College, Great St Mary's Church, Senate House, Market Square, Christ College, Emmanuel College, Sidney Sussex College, The Round Church, St. John College, River Cam Quayside, Pepys Library, Magdalene College, Trinity College, Trinity Bridge, the Mathematical Bridge, Peterhouse Chapel and College.

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Public Transport: There are frequent trains from London King’s Cross & London Liverpool Street to Cambridge. During weekdays - there is a service every 10-15 minutes from Liverpool Street station. The ride takes 1.10 - 1.25 hrs. The train ride is quite expensive. Buy "Advance" tickets. Even if the times of your ride are fixed in advance - you can "round the corner" and catch any train without detected or fined by the the conductors. Duration: 1 day. Weather: ONLY good weather. Walking along Cambridge canals deserves a bright day. Distance: 10 km.

Start & End: Cambridge Railway Station. Orientation: Whether you’re visiting Cambridge on a day trip from London, or you’ve decided to spend a few days in one of England’s finest historic university towns, the best thing to do is to step off the crowded streets of Trumpington and King’s Parade, and into college grounds. These places feel like a sanctuary from the outside world. It’s easy to get transported into another time, with ivy-covered towers built hundreds of years ago, porters manning the gates, green lawns that are not to be crossed, and students stepping out in their black academic gowns for formal dinners.

Spending half-an-hour in Liverpool Street before taking your train to Cambridge: Walk 300 m. west to Liverpool Street to Broadgate Circle and spend lovely 20-30 minutes in the charming Urban Eden site. From Liverpool Street Station head west toward Sun St Passage. Turn left onto Sun St Passage. Turn right toward Appold St, then left. Continue onto Sun St and turn left and right onto Broadgate Circle. This brilliant, modern and mainly-pedestrianized development is located beside (west to) and above the railway approaches into Liverpool Street station. In the winter months Broadgate circle used to host Broadgate Ice; London's only turn up and skate rink (not sure, but think there is another skate rink in Canary Wharf). In November 2017, Broadgate installed their first Christmas market. Broadgate Circle is one of London’s latest dining hubs, with a diverse collection of restaurants, bars, cafes and ‘street food traders. With a collection of no less than 18 separate buildings grouped around several open areas, the site acts more like a small town than an office environment. Broadgate Circle has a unique, modern amphitheatre setting and offers international cuisine all year round – from breakfast to supper. There's a lot of dramatic and intriguing architecture in this area. This open space is one of the most memorable features and has been dramatically filled with an amphitheatre. An upper level walkway, level with surrounding squares, fills the outer parts of the circle and lets on to steps down to a shopping arcade and Liverpool Street Station beyond. The bottom layer of the circle is home to shops. Above this is the walkway with views through to the middle, then above that a circular layer of raised bars for those that want a drink

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Its main asset during the spring and summer months is a collection of Urban Eden gardens. Urban Eden forms part of an ongoing initiative at Broadgate, which forms the site as a green space:

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Deliciously Ella pop-up garden:

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If you have five minutes more, hurry-up to the main entrance of Liverpool street. You find myself in front of a modern statue in bright bronze of a collection of five children. This is the Kindertransport. In 1938 and 1939, ten thousand unaccompanied Jewish children were transported to Britain to escape persecution in their hometowns in Germany and Austria. These children arrived at Liverpool Street station to be taken in by British families and foster homes. Only a few were reunited with their families after World War II. Terrifying and, still, noble chapter in the history of modern Europe:

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Our daily Cambridge itinerary: we start at the Cambridge Railway Station and walk westward along the Station Road. 350 m. east of the station resides the Cambridge University Botanic Garden (CUBG). We enter the garden through Station Road Gate which is located behind the War Memorial at the junction of Hills Road and Station Road. Opening hours: JAN, NOV + DEC: 10.00 - 16.00, FEB-MAR, OCT: 10.00 – 17.00, APR – SEP: 10.00 - 18.00. Prices: Adult  £6.00, over 65s and students with a recognised identification card £5.50, children 0-16 inclusive FREE. Impossible to deposit luggage at the tickets office. The garden is highly rated by gardening enthusiasts. It holds a plant collection of over 8000 plant species from all over the world to facilitate teaching and research. The garden was created for the University of Cambridge in 1831 by Professor John Stevens Henslow (Charles Darwin's mentor) and was opened to the public in 1846. It is an amazing, sublime  garden. A peaceful haven. You can spend here hours or, even, half a day. Lots of areas such as the Stream garden, the Bog Garden, the Dry garden, the Rock garden, The Scented Garden, The Chronological Bed etc. A vast variety of plants, trees and flowers. From the outside you would have no idea how spacious and beautiful the gardens are. Very well laid out and superb planting. Eexplanatory panels guide you through the different species. Take your time and make the most of this wonderful garden. You can see, in these gardens, also birds, reptiles, invertebrates, mammals and amphibians that live in these ecosystems:

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Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

To continue with our route - please exit the gardens from the same entrance (Station Street entrance, the eastern entrance). Walk north along Regent Street (most of the roads, in this area, have no signs), and, immediately turn west (left) to Bateman Street.

Someone tried scratching off the "E":

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We take this road westward until its end (the Botanic Garden on our left) and turn RIGHT (north) to Trumpington Street. Walking approx. 500 m. north along Trumpington will bring us to  The Fitzwilliam Museum. The sole public transport to this museum is the U bus from Madingley Road Park & Ride, Cambridge Station (weekdays ONLY). Opening hours: TUE - SAT: 10.00 - 17.00, SUN and Bank Holiday Mondays: 12.00 - 17.00. CLOSED: Mondays, Good Friday, 24-26 & 31 December and 1 January. FREE Admission. No large bags and backpacks) or animals are accepted inside. There are coin operated lockers at the South Entrance for coats and personal items. Photography allowed but NO flash.

The grand façade of the neoclassical building of Fitzwilliam Museum:

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Henry Moore, Reclining Figure, 1951 (stands in one of the inner courts, outside the museum):

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The Fitzwilliam Museum’s collection of paintings comprises nearly 1700 works, ranging from the 13th to the 21st century. In addition to the regular galleries (over 30) there are alwaysn special  temporary (sometimes, extraordinary) exhibitions on. Among the highlights are paintings by Italian artists, especially those of the Venetian school, with masterpieces by Titian, Veronese, Bellotto and Canaletto; a superb collection of landscapes of all schools, including a notable group of atmospheric outdoor oil sketches by Corot, Turner and Constable; a distinguished group of portraits and portrait miniatures by British artists from the 17th to the 20th century, and a remarkable range of works by French Impressionist painters. There are significant holdings of Dutch and Flemish paintings, among which are distinguished works by Ruisdael, Hobbema, Hals and Rubens. The collection of French paintings has grown significantly in recent years with the gift, bequest and purchase of paintings by Poussin, Delacroix, Géricault, Courbet and Monet among others. A particular strength are works by late-19th and 20th-century British and French artists, with outstanding groups of paintings by Vuillard, Bonnard, Sickert, Augustus John, Stanley Spencer and Matisse. You can then relax in the café where they serve really nice scones.

Rubens, The Death of Hippolytus:

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The Last of England, by Ford Madox Brown:

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Cordelia's Portion , by Ford Madox Brown:

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Renoir, La Place Clichy (1880):

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Alfred Sisley - A Street in Port Marley (1875-7):

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Walter Sickert, Mornington Crescent Nude, 1907:

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Jean Leon Jerome, Portarait of Claud-Armand Jerome (1848):

Stanley Spencer, Self-portrait Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip with Patricia Preece:

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We leave the FitzWilliam Museum - continuing north along Trumpington Street. We pass: Little St.Mary's Lane, Mill Lane, Silver Street and we see Corpus Christi College on our right. It is notable as the only college founded by Cambridge townspeople.  it was established in 1352 by the Guild of Corpus Christi and the Guild of the Blessed Virgin Mary. It is the sixth-oldest college in Cambridge. With around 250 undergraduates and 200 postgraduates, it also has the second smallest student body of the traditional colleges of the Cambridge University. One of the wealthiest colleges in Cambridge and very high-ranking in academic achievements of its undergraduates in the UK. Entrance price: £2.50. Architectural and historical grandeur at its best. Very special atmosphere.

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The main entrance - the new court (looking east):

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Looking north-east:

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Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

The old court:

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The College Chapel:

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Parker library:

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Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

DO NOT MISS the Corpus Clock or Chronograph which stands at the north-west corner of the college, on the outside of the Taylor Library, at the junction of Bene't Street and Trumpington Street, looking out over King's Parade. It was conceived and funded by John C. Taylor, an old member of the college. It was officially unveiled to the public ONLY on 19 September 2008 by Cambridge physicist Stephen Hawking !

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Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

From the intersection of Benet Street and Kings Parade (where the Corpus Clock resides) you continue several steps forward more northward - to see the King's College premises on your left (west). The most famous college in Cambridge. King's college lies east to the River Cam and faces out onto (west to) King's Parade in the centre of Cambridge city centre. King's College was founded in 1441 by Henry VI, soon after he had founded its sister college in Eton. However, the King's plans for the college were disrupted by the Wars of the Roses and resultant scarcity of funds, and his eventual deposition. Little progress was made on the project until in 1508 Henry VII began to take an interest in the college, most likely as a political move to legitimize his new position. The building of the college's chapel, begun in 1446, was finally finished in 1544 during the reign of Henry VIII. King's College Chapel is regarded as one of the greatest examples of late Gothic English architecture. One of the largest undergraduate and graduate colleges in Cambridge.

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Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

The Front Courtyard:

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Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

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Founder's fountain:

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It has the world's largest fan-vault,

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and the chapel's stained-glass windows and wooden chancel screen are considered some of the finest from their era.

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The chapel's choir, composed of male students at King's and choristers from the nearby King's College School, is one of the most renowned in the world. Every year on Christmas Eve the Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols  is broadcasted from the chapel to millions of listeners worldwide. SO, we may say that the two most attractive highlights of the visit in King's College would be: the chapel and the choir. Make sure you line up at 16.45 for the 17.30 evensong. Queue up early. If you get there late you might not sit near the choir. The chapel is truly magnificent.  It is quite stunningly beautiful.

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Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

The picture of the Adoration of the Magi over the altar is world famous and it certainly deserves to be:

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Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Opening Hours: Term Dates: 16 January - 16 March 2018, 24 April - 15 June 2018, 2 October - 30 November 2018: MON - FRI 9.30 - 15.30, SAT 9.30 - 13.15, SUN 13.15 - 14.30. Other periods of the year (non-term dates): everyday 9.30 - 16.30 (except during December and January when the Chapel closes at 15.30). Prices: adult £9.00 or concessions (children and students) £6.00. Photography allowed but without flash and tripod. You buy tickets for entering King's College from the King's College shop on the opposite side of King's parade (the continuation of Trumpington Street). The shop is with books, cards, pictures, clothes, etc associated with King's College. A tip: most of the interesting buildings can already be seen from outside. Attend the service, where you can access the chapel for free and can also listen to the choir. After the service you are free to shortly walk around in the college.

200 m. more northward along King's Parade (north end) will bring us (on our right, east) to Great St Mary's Church, The University Church, Senate House Hill:

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it is the university church for the University of Cambridge. The church  houses the University Organ and the University Clock. The latter chimes the "Cambridge Chimes" which were later used by the clock tower of the "Big Ben" in London. The first church on the site of the current one was built in 1205, but this was mostly destroyed by fire 9 July 1290 and then rebuilt. During its early years, the church was the property of the crown, but on 15 July 1342, the land was passed to King's Hall. Ownership then passed to Trinity College, where it has rested since. In the Middle Ages it became an official gathering place for meetings and debates for Cambridge University, but this ceased in 1730 when the University's Senate House was built across the street. The present building was constructed between 1478 and 1519. The church was restored by James Essex in 1766. In 1850–51 a restoration was carried out by George Gilbert Scott, followed by further work by Anthony Salvin in 1857. The south porch was rebuilt in 1888. There has been some more restoration work during the 20th century. FREE, but if you want climb the tower you have to pay around 3 pound. Fantastic, amazing views. Not so many stairs (125), but, the stairs are circular and a bit narrow though. On the way up, you go past the bells and can see them as well:

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Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

The Senate House viewed from the Great St Mary's tower:

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The Senate House is west to Great St Mary Church. It resides in the northern  end of the King's Parade road. The Senate House of the University of Cambridge is now used mainly for degree ceremonies. It was formerly also used for meetings of the Council of the Senate. The building was designed and built in 1722–1730 by architect James Gibbs in a neo-classical style. Graduates are presented in the Senate House college by college, in order of foundation or recognition by the university.  In the end of King's Parade we turn right (east) to St. Mary Street and, immediately, right to the Market Hill - just to stroll around the busy market stalls. Cambridge Market is centered around the Market Square.  This market is one of the landmarks of the city. It is a nice, little, diverse and cosmopolitan  market place with local produce and interesting food selection from all over the world - as broad as the selection of countries represented in Cambridge's student population. Many stalls do really good looking "street food". Most of the stalls close at 15.00. Several are open until 17.00:

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Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

The next college (Christ College) is 300 m. from the Market Square. Head south on Market Hill toward St Mary's Passage, 70 m. Turn right toward Petty Cury, 17 m. Trn left onto Petty Cury, 130 m. Turn right onto Sidney St, 30 m.  Sharp left onto St Andrew's St, 22 m. Turn right and after 15 m. you see the Christ College on your right. The Christ College was founded by William Byngham in 1437. In 1505, the college was granted a new royal charter and changed its name to Christ's College, becoming the twelfth of the Cambridge colleges to be founded in its current form. Within Cambridge, Christ's has a reputation for strong academic performance and tutorial support. It has averaged 1st place on the annual ranking, that lists the Colleges of the University of Cambridge in order of their undergraduate students' performances, from 1980–2006 and third place from 2006 to 2013. One of the wealthiest colleges in Cambridge. Christ College is open to visitors ONLY in terms dates except during the Christmas close down and during the Quiet Period (exams and holidays periods), as follows: College Grounds 09.00 - 16.00 7 Days a week, Fellows' Garden 09.00 - 16.00 Monday to Friday only.

The Great Gate on St Andrew's Street:

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The First Court:

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The Chapel in the First Court:

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The Second Court:

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The New Court:

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Young Darwin Statue by Anthony Smith, in Darwin gardens adjacent to the New Court, Christ's College:

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After exiting Christ College we change direction, for a short (optional) detour, and continue walking along Hobson Street and St. Andrews Street with our back to the north (Christ College) and our face to the south. After passing Emmanuel Street on our left (north-east) and arriving to Downing Street (on our right) we see Emmanuel College on our left. One of the top-ranking and wealthiest colleges in Cambridge. In every year from 1998, Emmanuel has been among the top six colleges in the table, which ranks colleges according to end-of-year examination results. Its mean score places it as the second highest ranking college. Emmanuel is the fourth wealthiest of the colleges at Cambridge. Like all of the older Cambridge Colleges, Emmanuel originally took only male students. It first admitted female students in 1979. The college was founded in 1584 by Sir Walter Mildmay, Chancellor of the Exchequer to Elizabeth I. Mildmay's foundation made use of the existing buildings. The College had been occupied, before,  by a Dominican friary until the Dissolution of the Monasteries, between 1536 and 1541 by by King Henry VIII. Emmanuel Collegeis found to be quite a pleasant place with a real sense of community. Not big and scary but not too small and gossipy. It Is also a beautiful college, located right near to the new Grand Arcade shopping centre. It's one of the most competitive colleges to get a place at:

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Emmanuel College Chapel designed by Christopher Wren:

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Dining hall of Emmanuel College:

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We retrace our steps and walk back along St. Andrews Street, with our face to the north, until e meet the intersection with Petty Cury. We continue directly north along Sidney Street. We pass the Green Street on our left, and, immediately further, on our right is the Sidney Sussex College. The college was founded in 1596 under the terms of the will of Frances Sidney, Countess of Sussex (1531–1589) and named after its foundress. In her will, Lady Sussex left the sum of £5,000 together with some plate to found a new college at Cambridge University "to be called the Lady Frances Sidney Sussex College". It was from its inception an Protestant foundation.  Sir John Harington and Henry Grey, 6th Earl of Kent, supervised by Archbishop John Whitgift, founded the college seven years after her death. Oliver Cromwell studied here. Cromwell was born in the nearby town of Huntingdon and came up to Cambridge to study in 1616. Cromwell's skull was buried in the college ante-chapel in 1960. Sidney Sussex is recognized as one of the smaller, more classical Cambridge colleges. Its current student body consists of roughly 350 undergraduate students and 190 graduates. Academically, Sidney Sussex has tended towards a mid-table position in the unofficial Cambridge University Colleges Table, Surprisingly elegant, peaceful grounds. Open: everyday 09.00 - 15.00. The Chapel Court:

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View of the college from Sidney Street:

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North face of Hall Court:

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Impressive Chapel inside Sidney Sussex College - an unexpectedly long and beautiful place of worship. Before the founding of the college the site was occupied by Franciscan friars, so it's no surprise to find a fine wood-carvings. A beautiful chapel, and empty of tourists...:

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Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

We continue walking northward, entering, now, the Bridge Street and passing, on our right, the Jesus Lane. On our right is the Round Church. One of the most enjoyable small churches in East Anglia. The round shape was believed to represent resurrection, since Constantine's church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem (regarded as one of the most holy sites in Christendom) was though to stand over the site where Jesus was buried, and where he subsequently rose from the dead. Given this symbolic meaning, only four medieval round churches survive; The Round Church in Cambridge, Temple Church in London, St John's in Little Maplestead, Essex, and Holy Sepulchre in Northampton. The round bit, the older part was constructed in 1130 by a religious guild of local merchants. Sometime before the mid-13th century this Holy Sepulchre church became a 'proper' parish church, served by Augustinian monks from the Hospital of St John. It is the marvelous circular nave and ambulatory, with the wonderful medieval carvings, that make this such an enjoyable church to visit. a real gem. Opening hours: MON 14.00 - 17.00, TUE - SAT 10.00 - 17.00, SUN 13.30 - 17.00. Prices:  adult £3, child - £1.50. Bill Gates, the Dalai Lama and Queen Victoria have all visited the Round Church!

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Opposite the Round Church (left or west to the intersection of Bridge Street and the Round Church Road or St. John Street) stands the St. John College. Opening hours: 1 MAR - 31 OCT: 10.00 - 17.00, Other dates (off-season): 10.00 - 15.30. The College is closed from 25 December - 2 January. Prices: Adult: £10, Children (12-17), senior citizens & students: £5.00, Children under 12: FREE. The tourist route is accessible by all visitors; however the main route enters the Chapel via steps. The college was founded by Lady Margaret Beaufort (mother of King Henry VII) in 1511. She had begun the process of transforming the ancient hospital of St John the Evangelist, Cambridge (founded c. 1200), into a college for students in the liberal arts and theology. The college's alumni include the winners of ten Nobel Prizes, seven prime ministers and twelve archbishops of various countries. The Romantic poet William Wordsworth studied at the college, as did William Wilberforce and Thomas Clarkson, the two who led the movement that brought slavery to an end in the British Empire. Prince William was affiliated with St John's while undertaking a university-run course in estate management in 2014. St John's College is also well known for its choir, its members' success in a wide variety of inter-collegiate sporting competitions and its annual May Ball. In 2011, the college celebrated its 500 years anniversary, an event marked by a visit of HM Queen Elizabeth II and HRH Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.

The main entrance is from St. John Street. The gatehouse is crenelated and adorned with the arms of the founder Lady Margaret Beaufort. Above these are displayed her ensigns, the Red Rose of Lancaster and Portcullis. The college arms are flanked by curious creatures known as yales, mythical beasts with elephants' tails, antelopes' bodies, goats' heads, and swiveling horns:

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First Court is the oldest part of the college, built in the years 1511-20 to contain all the necessary buildings of a residential college, including living quarters, kitchen, library, and hall. First Court is entered via the Great Gate, and is highly architecturally varied. First Court was converted from the hospital on the foundation of the college, and constructed between 1511 and 1520. Though it has since been gradually changed, the front (east) range is still much as it appeared when first erected in the 16th century. Parts of First Court were used as a prison in 1643 during the English Civil War. In April 2011, Queen Elizabeth II visited St John's college to inaugurate a new pathway in First Court, which passes close to the ruins of the Old Chapel.

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The Chapel, designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott and built during the 1860s, includes in its interior some pieces saved from the original chapel. It is the tallest building in Cambridge:

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The Chapel Roof:

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Second Court:

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St. John's Third Court, Old Library on the Right:

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We continue walking north-west along Bridge Street. We pass Portugal Place,on our right, with its white-washed low houses. The next road to the right is Thompson Lane (with a closed Synagogue). At last we arrive to the River Cam. We turn RIGHT and walk with our face to the north-east along the river and along the River Cam Quayside: (note: we shall return back along this section afteer having glance at the bridge, the lock and the pier):

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Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

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Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

punting can be quite tricky if you do it for the first time, be prepared to collide with others boats and having to control at all first half an hour:

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

The Lock and the Bridge on River Cam:

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Jesus Common (on your right, east) from the Bridge on River Cam:

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Return along the eastern bank of River Cam - back to the bridge which connects Bridge Street (the east bank of Rivar Cam) and Magdalene Street on the west bank of River Cam. After passing Prezzo restaurant and the bridge over the river (our face to the west) - we see Pepys Library on our right (east) (second court of Magdalene College). Part of Magdalene College, but should be admired in its own right. This is the personal library collected by Samuel Pepys which he bequeathed to the college following his death in 1703. Regarded as the jewel in the crown of Magdalene College, the Pepys Library is a rare example of a 17th-century private library. The Library is open to members of the public and visiting scholars. Pepys was a lifelong bibliophile and carefully nurtured his large collection of books, manuscripts, and prints. At his death, there were more than 3,000 volumes, including the diary, all carefully catalogued and indexed; they form one of the most important surviving 17th-century private libraries. Pepys made detailed provisions in his will for the preservation of his book collection; and, when his nephew and heir, John Jackson, died, in 1723, it was transferred, intact, to Magdalene College (in the Second Court). The library houses Samuel Pepys’s original diaries and remains one of the most significant collections of books, manuscripts, documents and prints acquired by any private individual. Pepys Library is open to visitors during Cambridge University Full Term and for a period over the summer. Booking in advance is not required. Entrance to the Pepys Library is FREE for individuals. Opening hours: 05.01.18 – 25.03.18: MON - SAT: 14.00 - 16.00, 17.04.18 – 08.09.18 MON - FRI: 14.00 - 16.00, SAT: 11.30 - 12.30, 13.30 - 14.30, 09.09.18 - 30.09.18 Closed. The Library is housed on the first floor of the building. FREE entrance (and from here you can continue to other premises of Magdalene College). The gardens around are very pretty and calming too. You cannot take any bags, cameras or phones into the library. NO photography of any sort is allowed inside. Unbelievable piece of history !!! The old books and manuscripts are wonderful to see:

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Follow the signs or walk more to the west and you are facing the other buildings of Magdalene College. Remember: entrance is FREE compared to over charged other colleges in Cambridge. One of the small and more delighted colleges in Cambridge. Wonderful architecture and stunning setting on the river. Walk into the First Court and see the delightful houses around:

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Step into the second courtyard and enter the fellows dining hall (no electricity here it all by candlelight). All very Harry Potter like:

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Walk into the Fellows Hall and see the wooden panels, the long benches and the pulpit:

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From Magdalene College we head southwest. We turn right toward Magdalene St and turn left o(south) onto Magdalene St. We continue south-east onto Bridge St, go through 1 roundabout and turn right (west) onto the pretty All Saints Passage:

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We turn LEFT (south) onto Trinity street. The second turn to the right is Trinity Lane:

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On the middle of Trinity Lane, on your right (north) is the main entrance (Great Gate) to Trinity College. The Great Court and the Chapel are open daily, 10.00 - 16.30. Tickets, priced at £3 for adults, may be purchased from the visitors’ booth inside Great Gate. Alternatively, Great Court may be viewed from beneath Queen’s Gate, on Trinity Lane, every day, free of charge. Photography is allowed (no tripods) except of the Wren Library section in the back side of the campus. Trinity was founded by Henry VIII in 1546, when he combined two existing colleges and seven hostels. Trinity College is now a home to around 600 undergraduates, 300 graduates, and over 180 Fellows. The most expensive and most reputable College in Cambridge. Members of Trinity have won 32 Nobel Prizes out of the 91 won by members of Cambridge University, the highest number of any college at either Oxford or Cambridge. Isaac Newton discovered gravity here, in this college. Unfortunately, the Wren Library was closed during our visit. We were told it has a very unique atmosphere and very rare documents and books. Walk in the footsteps of the greats: texts by Newton, including his annotated Principia Mathematica, documents of Galileo, and Copernicus, an original copy of the Canterbury Tales, the First Folio of Shakespeare, A.A Milne's hand-written manuscript of Winnie the Pooh as well as Milton's manuscripts are there. The Library is only accessible for two hours, during the day, and only allows access to 15 persons at a time. Only half of the Library's central space is open for visitors. Do not miss the Chapel with the sculptures of, amongst others, Newton and Tennyson.

Great Court of Trinity College:

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Great Gate (left side of the photo):

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The statue of the college's founder Henry VIII over the Great Gate:

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

The Clock Tower at the Trinity College:

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

The Dining Hall:

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Head west on Trinity Lane and turn left to stay on Trinity Lane. Turn right onto Garret Hostel Lane and you face, in front the Trinity Bridge over River Cam. It was built in 1765 to the designs of James Essex to replace an earlier bridge built in 1651:

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

To the left of the bridge (south) is Jerwood Library.

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

We continue walking SOUTHWARD along the River Cam. We see the Clare College  (and a narrow water canal) on our left. It is 800 m. walk southward until this path ends (at Queens College and the Mathematical Bridge).  We pass through the back entrance of Kings College (no entrance to the public). When the path ends - we see the Mathematical Bridge. The Mathematical Bridge bridges the River Cam northwest of Silver Street Bridge and connects two parts of Queens' College. Its official name is simply the Wooden Bridge. The bridge was designed by William Etheridge, and built by James Essex in 1749. It has been rebuilt on two occasions, in 1866 and in 1905, but has kept the same overall design. Although it appears to be an arch, it is composed entirely of straight timbers built to an unusually sophisticated engineering design, hence the name. The original "mathematical bridge" was another bridge of the same design, also commissioned by James Essex, crossing the Cam between Trinity and Trinity Hall colleges, where Garret Hostel Bridge now stands.

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

We turn LEFT (east) to Silver Street. At the intersection of Silver Street and Trumpington Street - we see this church:

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We turn RIGHT (south) to Trumpington Street. After walking 320 m. south along Trumpington Street - we see Peterhouse Chapel and College on our right. It is the oldest college of the university, having been founded in 1284 by Hugo de Balsham, Bishop of Ely, and granted its charter by King Edward I. Today, Peterhouse is one of the wealthiest colleges in Cambridge. The college has very small student population. Peterhouse is one of the few colleges that still insists that its members attend communal dinners, known as "Hall". Hall takes place in two sittings, with the second known as "Formal Hall", which consists of a three-course candlelit meal and which must be attended wearing gowns. At Formal Hall, the students rise as the fellows proceed in, a gong is rung, and two Latin graces are read.

Citywalk in , United Kingdom, visiting things to do in United Kingdom, Travel Blog, Share my Trip

From Peterhouse - we have a 2 km.walk to Cambridge Railway Station. Head southeast on Trumpington St toward Fitzwilliam St, 320 m. Slight left to stay on Trumpington St. At the roundabout, take the 1st exit onto Lensfield Rd. Continue to followLensfield Road, 480 m. Turn right onto Hills Rd, 480 m. Turn left onto Station Rd, 480 m.

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